rock roll – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 19:43:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://micgillette.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-2021-08-02T161817.082-150x150.png rock roll – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ 32 32 A musician honors his gift from God https://micgillette.com/a-musician-honors-his-gift-from-god/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 10:15:10 +0000 https://micgillette.com/a-musician-honors-his-gift-from-god/ When Sean Kelly isn’t on stage rocking his guitar in front of thousands of fans, he can be found in a classroom with his students or at home with his wife and two young sons. Lead guitarist for award-winning Canadian singer Nelly Furtado, Kelly is the founder of Toronto rock band Crash Kelly and has […]]]>

When Sean Kelly isn’t on stage rocking his guitar in front of thousands of fans, he can be found in a classroom with his students or at home with his wife and two young sons.

Lead guitarist for award-winning Canadian singer Nelly Furtado, Kelly is the founder of Toronto rock band Crash Kelly and has toured with such legendary artists as Alice Cooper. But he is also a music teacher at both St. Timothy’s Catholic School and Canadian Martyrs Catholic School in Toronto, where he teaches instrumental and vocal music to grades 7 and 8 from kindergarten to 6th year. While it may seem like a double life to some, for Kelly it’s all part of who he is.

“I think I’m honoring a gift,” Kelly said. ” I believe him. I think music is a gift from God and I feel I have to honor it in the best way possible.

He’s been in love with the sound of rock and roll music since growing up in North Bay in the 1980s. With a pawnshop guitar and an old amplifier given to him at Christmas in 1984, he began to trying to emulate his favorite artists such as Van Halen, Def Leppard and Mötley Crüe. Growing up, he found solace in music in many forms, from performing in his church choir to practicing rock and roll with his friends. Like many teenagers, he struggled with insecurities and through music found a sense of belonging among others who shared his passion.

The call to teach snuck up on him. He studied music at the University of Toronto and started playing with bands, landed record deals and started touring. He decided to take a break from touring to go to teachers’ college. His plan was to be a substitute teacher to supplement his music career, but he ended up “falling in love with it”. He started teaching in 2000 and for the past 22 years he’s been in the classroom, making time for gigs touring here and there. He also spent time teaching the music business to high school students on First Nations reserves and mentoring young artists.

As an educator, Kelly ultimately tries to show her students that music is a universal language with the power to create a sense of community and belonging for all, regardless of superficial differences used to divide people. Throughout history, he teaches, music has been a tool of unity. From racial segregation in North America and beyond, music has brought people together and helped show that inside all human beings are essentially the same.

“I think ultimately I’m called to be a teacher based on my experiences,” Kelly said. “I have seen many things in my life. It’s funny, I’ve talked (to my students) about African-Canadian and African-American musicians and artists. I tell them how jazz music has been one of the main sources of unity in bringing together black musicians and white musicians. What a vehicle for social justice it was and how many barriers have come down where politicians have failed and society has failed. I find that music is a way to speak to our greater humanity and is a great common thread.

Balancing his life as a teacher, husband, father, and rock musician has been a synergistic dance over the years. Keeping his family first has been the key that has kept him grounded. These days, raising his seven- and 10-year-old sons holds him back as much as possible. A family affair, his wife and children are also music lovers and his children take piano lessons.

More than a profession, Kelly says music is still her favorite pastime. He’s amassed an impressive collection of guitars over the years and after a long day, tinkering with the guitar is still his favorite way to unwind. It’s a time to reflect on the experiences throughout the day and let the energy of the music reverberate through your fingers. Since childhood, music has always been synonymous with camaraderie, friendship and spiritual connection.

“In church, music is a form of prayer,” Kelly said. “I wonder if it’s always been that way (for me). If you’re still trying to honor the gift God has given you, maybe that’s a form of prayer. Interesting thought.

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Early Access Battle Bands Impressions – For Those About To Rock https://micgillette.com/early-access-battle-bands-impressions-for-those-about-to-rock/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 15:00:45 +0000 https://micgillette.com/early-access-battle-bands-impressions-for-those-about-to-rock/ In recent years, cartoon deck building games have been very popular. Most games stick pretty closely to the kill the arrow formula, but I don’t think I’ve seen one that tried to change things as drastically as battle bands. The premise is simple: you play as the sole member of a four-person rock band against […]]]>

In recent years, cartoon deck building games have been very popular. Most games stick pretty closely to the kill the arrow formula, but I don’t think I’ve seen one that tried to change things as drastically as battle bands. The premise is simple: you play as the sole member of a four-person rock band against another rock band. It takes one of two forms. The first is a random mode where you create a party and fight AI boss type enemies. And the other has you in a series of matches against other human players.

Once you’ve started, battle bands introduces you to the tutorial. You are put in a pre-made band as a guitarist. The bottom line is that both groups must compete for one of them to emerge victorious. Your group must reach 100 hype. To gain Hype, a band must have an active Song Section card. There are four members in each band, consisting of a guitarist, bassist, drummer, and keyboardist. Each of the four has instrument-specific song sections that they can set up, or common song sections that can be in anyone’s deck.

Once a song section is defined, a number of performance cards can be played. Party members have a certain amount of energy, which allows them to play cards in their deck. Each performance card increases the hype of a group. You can also play certain cards that reduce the hype of the opposing group or have other effects. If a party member runs out of cards but still has energy, they can choose to give that energy to another member. It’s an interesting setup that makes some sense, given the premise.

Prints Battle Strips 2

rock and reign

When you start a campaign, you can create a new group or join an existing one. This mode allows you to join three other players or just play with bots. You can even tell the bots what to do via battle bands‘ chat functionality. The campaign puts you in a van and has you choose places to go on a map. These tend to provide opportunities for new maps or enemy warbands to face. Opposed groups often have fewer members, but they are thematic. One is the Goo Fighters, which is a group made up of slimes. Another has you scrambling on a trailer on the open road as the background scrolls by. There is a fair amount of creativity involved.

The thing is, whether or not battle bands worth picking up at launch is based purely on playerbase size. I like the concepts and the systems are interesting. But this game is not so fun in single player. You can really only play a few cards here and there before spending a few minutes waiting until you can get going again.

It would certainly be different with seven other people in a session, but finding that many people might be difficult at launch. The game will need a lot of people for anyone to find matches. That’s a pretty big risk and there’s not even a full comments page in the general discussions on the game’s Steam forum. Of course, word of mouth could definitely grow. battle bands, as it just entered Early Access. It might also be worth it for people playing through the campaign with three friends, but the focus is obviously on the larger multiplayer. One thing’s for sure, though: it’s a long way to the top, if you want to rock ‘n roll.

Prints Battle Strips 3

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The biggest bands on the planet https://micgillette.com/the-biggest-bands-on-the-planet/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 23:00:35 +0000 https://micgillette.com/the-biggest-bands-on-the-planet/ Tim Van Schmidt | New SCENE Over the years, many people have entrusted me with their record collection. They’re usually downsizing, moving, or just getting rid of stuff – and I find loads of old stuff interesting. Recently, I was finally able to listen to an unusual record I received in such a pile – […]]]>

Tim Van Schmidt | New SCENE

Over the years, many people have entrusted me with their record collection. They’re usually downsizing, moving, or just getting rid of stuff – and I find loads of old stuff interesting.

Recently, I was finally able to listen to an unusual record I received in such a pile – a five-track mini-LP recorded by the Fort Collins High School Symphonic Band of 1963-64. Under the direction of conductor Curtis Johnson, the disc is an example of the success of school music programs.

My high school marching band circa 1973

Forget that description – “school music programs” – for a moment. When I listened to this disc, containing compositions by DeNardis, Bach, Nelson, Reed and Seitz, I was struck by the success of these MUSICIANS. The sounds they made made me listen and enjoy what they were doing. They weren’t just students, they were artists.

What did I like? Through the twists in the music, the changes in dynamics, and the blending of a lot of instrumental vocals, I think this band really knew the music. I could hear a real attachment to that.

It is not enough to learn to play an instrument at school. It is not enough to play the right notes on the sheet music. What it takes is a group vision to create something good and the FCHS Symphonic Band of 1963-64 had that.

1963-64 FCHS Symphonic Band record released

My early experiences with music in schools, in my hometown of Illinois, were not so fruitful.

The day came when beginning music teachers first asked us to choose an instrument – in addition to the “flute-o-phone”, that is. I had just watched Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass on TV and wanted to play marimba. But the school only had one marimba and they gave it to another student.

Then I asked to play the drums, but, as you’d expect, a lot of other little boys (and girls) at my school wanted to play the drums, so I didn’t make that list either. .

Interestingly enough, several years later when I was visiting my grandmother, the next door neighbor came to visit and it turned out that the girl who got the marimba for me was her granddaughter. She informed me that her granddaughter had become “state champion” with her instrument.

I guess the school made the right choice.

I had to move to Phoenix, Arizona to get back into music at school. One day I found myself going to school with a paper clip in my hand and was placed in the beginner group. From then on, I played in the orchestras of all the schools I attended.

In elementary school in Phoenix, I played in bands “B” and “A” and got my first taste of the scene. In high school in California, I joined the marching band, which was also a concert band in the spring. This was also the case when I graduated from high school in Washington State.

These experiences were just awesome. It was an extra social scene for us, we got out of PE, we got to travel, and we got to play music together. There was a special bond between the band members that made it exciting – and at times the music really rocked.

Once I graduated from high school, I put down the trombone and kind of got lost in guitars and rock and roll

My interest in school music programs was reignited when my daughter attended Lincoln Junior High here in Fort Collins. She was in the beginner group and I attended one of their programs.

I was shocked when they successfully played Holst’s composition, “Mars.” I was impressed enough to write to the band manager to congratulate him and the band for attempting such a dynamic piece. Much to my daughter’s chagrin, the director read the letter aloud to the group.

Plus, I’ve loved hearing and seeing the CSU Ram Band perform at over a decade of football games, emphasizing that school music programs don’t just end with high school. Time and time again, I watched the Ram Band stir people up in the stands, then completely take over the pitch at halftime for high-profile entertainment.

CSU Ram Band helps launch the new stadium 2017 (photo by Tim Van Schmidt)

One of the greatest days of all was Band Day, when CSU hosted groups of high school students from across the region in a large rally. On one occasion I watched the whole football field full of bands, and wondered if I could see the biggest band in the world at that time – I estimated there were around 500 musicians on the field playing together.

Here’s the thing – these are all great bands; really, the biggest bands in the world in terms of really giving kids the opportunity to enjoy success with music.

Of course, today’s music programs have much more to offer. At FCHS today, for example, the music program includes orchestras, bands and choirs. But more than that, they also offer courses in “Unified Music, Music Technology, AP and Beginner Music Theory, Beginner and Advanced Guitar and Piano, and Rock and Pop History.” Fantastic!

Finding this FCHS file from so long ago was such a powerful reminder of an important part of my life. It also sounded very good.

It’s a recording that has reached out to me for 59 years with a message: support school music programs.

Tim Van Schmidt is a Fort Collins-based writer and photographer. Check out his YouTube channel on “Time Capsules by Tim Van Schmidt”.

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‘Flapping fists, jumping feet’ | Winter Jam 22 performs an “energetic” concert at Penn State’s BJC | Way of life https://micgillette.com/flapping-fists-jumping-feet-winter-jam-22-performs-an-energetic-concert-at-penn-states-bjc-way-of-life/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 17:17:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/flapping-fists-jumping-feet-winter-jam-22-performs-an-energetic-concert-at-penn-states-bjc-way-of-life/ From sparklers and flamethrowers to thousands of heads bowed in prayer, Winter Jam 22 welcomed members of the community to listen to various Christian musicians perform. The free concert took place at the Bryce Jordan Center on Friday, although attendees were encouraged to donate $10 upon admission. Acts included Skillet, Tauren Wells, KB, Colton Dixon, […]]]>

From sparklers and flamethrowers to thousands of heads bowed in prayer, Winter Jam 22 welcomed members of the community to listen to various Christian musicians perform.

The free concert took place at the Bryce Jordan Center on Friday, although attendees were encouraged to donate $10 upon admission.

Acts included Skillet, Tauren Wells, KB, Colton Dixon, I Am They, NewSong, Shane Pruitt, Abby Robertson and Bayside Worship, according to the tour’s website.

Additionally, actor Kevin Quinn – with notable roles in Disney Channel’s “Bunk’d” and the movie “A Week Away” – sang his latest single, “It’s About Time.”

During the PreJam, Bayside Worship performed, followed by Abby Robertson and Megan Duke.

“Let it go for God,” Duke said.

Abby Robertson sang her new single ‘Without Your Love’ before a Liberty University spokesperson spoke to the audience.

I Am They kicked off the show with their song “Faithful God.”

“Look at you all beautiful humans,” said Matthew Hein of I Am They.

The band went on to play four more songs before DJ GBaby took the stage for his intro.

NewSong followed the promotion of CONQER MUSIC – a minority-owned music and video platform “based on biblical principles”, the CONQER website said.

The band NewSong added a bit of country to the night of worship.

“External vocals only,” said a NewSong member.

Colton Dixon joined NewSong on stage for a combined performance of “Arise my Love.”

A spokesperson for Who’s Your One asked the public if they know “anyone who doesn’t know God”.

“We have something that Amazon cannot offer – the love of Jesus Christ,” the spokesperson said.

When KB entered the scene, the BJC bumps.

KB began rapping his hits like “Not Today Satan” and finished with the much-loved “Church Clap.”

During his set, KB asked the audience if he had been the victim of “generational criticism” on social media and in real life.






Christain Hip Hop artist KB preforms his set at Winter Jam, the self-proclaimed “Greatest Christian Music Tour” on Friday, March 4, 2022, at the Bryce Jordan Center in University Park, Pennsylvania.




Often, says KB, the faith of the younger generation is challenged by older generations.

“Let’s go pump your fists and jump your feet,” KB said. “We are right here.”

During “Church Clap”, KB asked the audience to create a “historic ride”, “lose [their] spirits” and “shake the building”.

KB ended their performance with the song “100” along with a short rap.

“My happy wife, Jesus loves me,” KB said. “I have nothing left to conform to.”

Another Liberty University spokesperson spoke about the university and said he knows “the one thing that can bring generations together.”

“It’s ‘Fireflies’ from Owl City,” he said during the song’s opening notes.

After “Fireflies,” evangelism speaker Shane Pruitt discussed the idea of ​​having a purpose in life.

Pruitt said “the word of God is Jesus” and asked the audience to “repent [their] sins” with them.

“Jesus is a better savior than we are sinners,” Pruitt said.

Tauren Wells danced on stage alongside his Christian pop songs.

After performing “Hills and Valleys,” Wells said “Thank You, Jesus” as he gazed up at the ceiling.

Another spokesperson for Compassion International, a humanitarian aid organization, shared his story with the adoption and sponsorship of a child in Kenya.

Compassion International volunteers distributed flyers to interested members of the public.

For those who made the first month’s deposit to sponsor a child, they were able to attend a special post-event “outing” with John Cooper, lead singer of Skillet.

During intermission, 14-year-old Ella Whyssler said her group of high school kids from Mount Union, Pennsylvania attended the concert together.

“Everything is so lively and energetic,” Whyssler said. “It’s like being with my second family.”

To begin the second half of the performance, Colton Dixon once again took the stage to perform, followed by Abby Robertson.







Dixon Winter Jam

Singer-songwriter Colton Dixon performs at Winter Jam, the self-proclaimed “greatest tour in Christian music,” Friday, March 4, 2022, at the Bryce Jordan Center in University Park, Pennsylvania.




NewSong’s Russ Lee shared the tour story – and mentioned that the band’s next location will be in Cleveland, Ohio.

“How many of you know that the people of Ohio need Jesus? Lee said. “Don’t hate them, pray for them.”

For the finale, Skillet brought energy to BJC as everyone stood up as the members entered the stage.

“Looks like you guys are ready to rock and roll,” Cooper said.

As the guitarists’ platforms rose and fell, fire erupted from the machines behind Cooper and the drummer.

During Skillet’s performance of his latest album “Dominion”, Cooper had fog machines strapped to his wrists.

“A lot of people have asked us why we named our album ‘Dominion,'” Cooper told the audience. “Because it looks sick.”

As the rest of Skillet’s band members left the stage, Cooper stayed onstage to discuss social media issues forcing young children to “deny” their spiritual “truths.”

“Parents, your children are being molested seven days a week,” Cooper said. “God is the only one who should make the rules.”

Cooper continued to discuss the “false ideologies” presented to young audiences on social media.

After Skillet’s performance, the hosts ended the concert with a prayer.

“It’s not just a concert,” Lee said. “It’s a spiritual movement.”

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Mike Campbell Leads The Dirty Knobs To External Combustion https://micgillette.com/mike-campbell-leads-the-dirty-knobs-to-external-combustion/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 15:31:43 +0000 https://micgillette.com/mike-campbell-leads-the-dirty-knobs-to-external-combustion/ Even after more than fifty years in the music industry, where he achieved legendary status through his work with Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers, guitarist Mike Campbell hasn’t grown jaded at the thought of releasing new works around the world, as he will on March 4 when his band, Mike Campbell & the Dirty Knobs, […]]]>

Even after more than fifty years in the music industry, where he achieved legendary status through his work with Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers, guitarist Mike Campbell hasn’t grown jaded at the thought of releasing new works around the world, as he will on March 4 when his band, Mike Campbell & the Dirty Knobs, release their second album, External combustion. “We’re excited as hell! I love the record and can’t wait to put it out,” Campbell told American Songwriter, calling from his home in Los Angeles.

External combustion follows the beginnings of the group, Wreckless abandonment, which came out in 2020 – but The Dirty Knobs go back much further than that: Campbell reckons he formed this band around 20 years ago as a side project he could do between Heartbreakers tours, ” so we know each other really well, and there’s an organic chemistry there that’s very comfortable for me,” he says. The lineup consists of Campbell, guitarist Jason Sinay, bassist Lance Morrison and drummer Matt Laug. For External combustionthey also brought in notable guest musicians: Margo Price, Ian Hunter, and Campbell’s former Heartbreakers teammate, keyboardist Benmont Tench.

With the end of the Heartbreakers following the death of Tom Petty in 2017, Campbell realized he still wanted to remain part of a band, so he decided to make The Dirty Knobs his main focus. “My mindset is to be part of the band – I never wanted to be a solo artist,” he says. “I just feel comfortable with a gang around me. That’s how I grew up, and that’s what I like to do now. It’s the most fun when you have your friends with you and can make music together.

This joyful energy is found in External combustion eleven songs – and even in the title of the album itself, which Campbell says is “a phrase that just popped into my head. I thought, ‘internal combustion’, then I thought, ‘No, it’s more like a external type of band combustion.’”

On this record, says Campbell, “about half of the songs are new songs. I went through my entire vault of analog tapes and found a few songs from maybe even twenty years ago that I had forgotten about that were pretty good, so I included them on the album. I found parts and sketches that I had completely forgotten: “Wow, I almost missed that; I have to finish this one.

While he’s happy to resurrect older tracks, Campbell says he never has a problem writing new songs either. “There are so many things to draw inspiration from,” he says. “Most of my inspiration came from the 60s when I was learning guitar. There were so many great bands and guitarists back then. These are the sources from which I drew. He is still motivated by these artists to this day: “I go back and listen to old music that inspires me – an old Stones album, or the Beatles or the Beach Boys, and I hear something there -inside: “It’s a chord I don’t do. never use. I’ll learn it and then try to work from it.

Regarding his songwriting methods, Campbell says, “My routine isn’t timed, but I’ve settled into a thing where I tend to write more in the morning. I wake up, have a coffee, then spend about an hour working on the idea that comes to me. But throughout the day, I could watch TV or play with the dogs or drive the car, and something would come to mind. I just try to catch the ideas when they come. He says he finds it useful to save snippets of songs to his phone. “Before, you had to stop the car and write it down. But now, with my phone, I can just press a button and start squirting my ideas and listening to them when I get home.

Although Campbell co-wrote many hits with Tom Petty, including songs that became classics (such as “You Got Lucky”, “Refugee”, “Here Comes My Girl” and “Runnin’ Down a Dream” , among many others), he admits he still can’t offer infallible songwriting advice. “We were lucky, Tom and I and the Heartbreakers, to have quite a few songs that touched people,” he says. “but it is a very mysterious thing. It’s like I almost hate talking about it because it’s like magic – I don’t want to jinx him!”

Still, he’s ready to offer insight into how to improve the odds of creating something that has the potential to connect strongly with listeners. “Originally, you write for yourself. You try to impress and please yourself. You feel like there’s something about it that’s really catchy or special. It’s inspired. It really surprises you. Maybe you’re writing something, and then a few of the pieces come together and you’re like, “Wow, this is way better than I expected.

“I love writing songs and I can talk about them all day – it’s fascinating,” Campbell continues. “It’s almost like you’re trying to write a song, you have this blank canvas in front of you and you’re waiting for something to happen – and then it’s like someone flips a switch and you see it,” Oh, that’s it,” and you just write what you see. It’s kind of my process. I start with nothing and hope the light comes on.

Campbell recalls the moment he realized he wanted to be a musician as a fifteen-year-old growing up in Florida: “Like a lot of kids my age, I watched The Ed Sullivan Show, and I watched the Beatles there. They played guitar and they seemed to have it all together, writing their own songs and playing their own music. That’s when I had the idea: ‘I would like to have a guitar’. I would like to be like that.

However, following this dream proved difficult. “I couldn’t afford a guitar because we weren’t so well off,” says Campbell. His mom bought him a $15 pawnshop guitar that he says is “unplayable.” He laughs at the suggestion that this might have been a blessing in disguise, as it forced him to become a more inventive player early on. “It’s possible, except that I didn’t really like bleeding fingers. Then I went to a friend’s house one day and he had a Gibson and I picked this up and said, ‘Oh my God, this is so easy.’ Then a little light came on: “I have to buy a better guitar. It took time. My first Stratocaster that I had was [because] a friend loaned me the money, $200 at the time. These guitars are worth fifty thousand now.

Even then, however, “I never sat down [and say], ‘Okay, I’m going to be a professional musician and try to make a living.’ It kind of happened over time,” says Campbell. “I taught myself guitar, met some friends, we started a band, we played in some really shitty bars and had fun. Once we had a demo and sparked a little interest from the record companies, it became more of a profession. Until then, it was like flying by the seat of our pants.

Campbell was originally in the band Mudcrutch with Tom Petty and Benmont Tench. They became popular in their native Florida, but fame eluded them and they went their separate ways after releasing just one album. In 1976, after moving to LA, they formed the band Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers, which went on to be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2002. did. I think I was very lucky, in many ways, but I also worked really hard,” says Campbell.

Looking back on his career, Campbell gives Tom Petty a lot of credit for helping him learn how to become a successful songwriter. “The first song I wrote with Tom [Petty] was called “Rockin’ Around (With You)” – it was on our first album [Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers, 1976]”, says Campbell. “Before that, I only had sketches. I don’t think I have finished songs. Tom was really good at finishing things and putting words to music, so he helped me a lot.

Campbell also credits Petty with teaching him how to be a good conductor. “I used to support his lead or his direction, and I learned a lot about how to do that,” he says. “Then I started my own band and just applied those skills to them. I found that I really liked it, being in front of the band and leading the guys.

Now firmly in the lead role, Campbell will take The Dirty Knobs on tour in support External combustion. He tells fans that “they can expect to hear songs from both [Dirty Knobs] albums, and some surprises. Maybe a few Heartbreakers songs here and there. We just want to hang out and have fun and distract people for a little while.

As he contemplates his career – both with The Dirty Knobs and the Heartbreakers – Campbell seems content. “You can tell people who are in it for the money, and I’m not,” he says. “Fortunately, I made enough money to live comfortably. I don’t need to go out and tour. I no longer need to make records. But I really like doing it and I want to improve. This is what keeps me going. You too want to keep having fun. It is so Amusing play in a band. There is no such thing. It’s the best job in the world. I would play music even if I couldn’t, just because that’s how much I love it.

See the next concerts of Mike Campbell and The Dirty Knobs HERE.

Photo by Chris Phelps/Sacks & Co

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Delta High School recognizes the importance of Black History Month https://micgillette.com/delta-high-school-recognizes-the-importance-of-black-history-month/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/delta-high-school-recognizes-the-importance-of-black-history-month/ Through the efforts of staff and administration, students at Ladner High School learn about the month-long tribute and recognition in the classroom and beyond. Black History Month is front and center at Delta Secondary. Through the efforts of staff and administration, students at Ladner High School learn about the month-long tribute and recognition in the […]]]>

Through the efforts of staff and administration, students at Ladner High School learn about the month-long tribute and recognition in the classroom and beyond.

Black History Month is front and center at Delta Secondary.

Through the efforts of staff and administration, students at Ladner High School learn about the month-long tribute and recognition in the classroom and beyond.

This includes in the common learning area where teacher-librarian Ms. Loiselle used her impressive monthly banners to recognize prominent and influential people as well as the rich history of the black community in the province, including Hogan’s Alley in Vancouver.

Students can use their phone to scan the QR code on the banners to learn more about each individual or topic featured.

“At Delta Secondary, we do our best to raise awareness and educate about important topics such as Black History Month in a variety of ways,” explained DSS Director John Pavao. “Our Learning Commons exhibition is an example of how we are actively working towards our Vision 2030 mission statement: an innovative and inclusive community where all learners belong, and everyone soars. As a school, we value diversity and inclusion and strive to ensure that all school activities are inclusive, accessible and equitable for students. »

Pavao also noted how the staff takes the opportunity to raise awareness and educate their students through a curricular lens.

He understands:

-Mrs. Kates and DSS Anti-Racism Committee Black Excellence Day – awareness and promotion by the school anti-racism team (in conjunction with the district anti-racism committee).

-Mrs. Huff’s English Class 12 examines the Black experience in Canada through the lens of Desmond Cole’s documentary The skin I’m in and through various episodes of the CBC series Being Black in Canadagiving students a first understanding of the history of Black Canadians as well as their modern experiences and contributions to Canadian culture and society, as well as ongoing efforts for social justice.

-Guitar teacher M. Dobrovolny teaches several lessons around the history and impact of black musicians (music) – history and origins, impact on musical genres (rock and roll, blues, gospel) and how these musicians have influenced the music of today.

“Teachers and staff bring students and classes to our library to view our Black History Month exhibit and the many books and resources available for individuals to learn about the stories associated with this topic,” Pavao continued. “Our learning space is a dynamic and interactive space where classes come to supplement or enrich their learning – learn research and inquiry skills, access written and digital resources, student presentations and view monthly postings created by Mrs. Loiselle.”

Other banners she has created each year include: Remembrance Day, LGBTQ+, Truth and Reconciliation, Freedom to Read, Diverse Voices – Read Around the World, DSS Festival of Dangerous Ideas, DSS FUNctional Math Festival, DSS Criminolgy 12 Murder Mystery, DSS ComicCon and various genres.

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Slash – The Return Of The Guitar Hero: behind the scenes of the new issue of Total Guitar https://micgillette.com/slash-the-return-of-the-guitar-hero-behind-the-scenes-of-the-new-issue-of-total-guitar/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 11:48:27 +0000 https://micgillette.com/slash-the-return-of-the-guitar-hero-behind-the-scenes-of-the-new-issue-of-total-guitar/ The new issue of Total Guitar is on sale now! Click here to buy your copy Cover: Return of the Guitar Hero TG talks to Guns N’ Roses legend ahead of new Conspirators release ‘4’ as he talks about writing and recording, using less gain in his tone, his love of the Gibson Flying V […]]]>

The new issue of Total Guitar is on sale now! Click here to buy your copy

Cover: Return of the Guitar Hero

TG talks to Guns N’ Roses legend ahead of new Conspirators release ‘4’ as he talks about writing and recording, using less gain in his tone, his love of the Gibson Flying V , and why he’d rather “keep it rock ‘n’ roll” than stick to what’s popular. We uncover some of the lesser-known highlights of Slash’s $2 million guitar collection and walk you through some techniques We’ve even produced three great GN’R video lessons for you.


Interviews

Court Act

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THE STRING REVOLUTION PAYS TRIBUTE TO RANDY RHOADS WITH THE RELEASE OF “CRAZY TRAIN” https://micgillette.com/the-string-revolution-pays-tribute-to-randy-rhoads-with-the-release-of-crazy-train/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 23:08:14 +0000 https://micgillette.com/the-string-revolution-pays-tribute-to-randy-rhoads-with-the-release-of-crazy-train/ Los Angeles-based label Tallest Man Records have released a stunning flamenco-tinged cover of the band’s iconic rock anthem “Crazy Train.” String Revolution with Steve Stevens. This collaboration came to pay tribute to the legendary guitarist Randy Rhoads and in particular to his love for the classical guitar. Steve Stevens has always been an admirer of […]]]>

Los Angeles-based label Tallest Man Records have released a stunning flamenco-tinged cover of the band’s iconic rock anthem “Crazy Train.” String Revolution with Steve Stevens. This collaboration came to pay tribute to the legendary guitarist Randy Rhoads and in particular to his love for the classical guitar. Steve Stevens has always been an admirer of Rhoads, and The String Revolution, directed by Janet Robin, has a special connection with Rhoads. Robin was her only guitar student when she was 9 years old. “When I was told Randy Rhoads was going to be inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, I was thrilled,” Stevens says. In my mind, I had one requirement, that it be in no way similar to the iconic original version. Hearing the track, two things immediately struck me, it works so well as a Spanish guitar track, and one that Randy would have loved. It is well known that Randy was a fine classical guitarist, even continuing lessons throughout his Ozzy days. I hope we made it, proud buddy.

The String Revolution are four virtuoso professional guitarists who create distinctive sounds with their guitars: mimicking percussion, special effects, melodic grooves, basslines, and more. They share a passion for many different musical styles and guitar techniques, which has given The String Revolution a unique sound. This is evident in their studio recordings and live shows. A clear dedication and hard work ethic for the project brought The String Revolution together. In addition to Janet Robin (who was named to Guitar Player Magazine’s “Top 50 Acoustic Guitarists Bonus List” 2017), who is also an acclaimed touring guitarist with artists like Lindsey Buckingham, Meredith Brooks, Air Supply , and many others, The String Revolution is made up of Austrian nylon-string guitarist Markus Illko, Swiss producer, songwriter and guitarist Daniel Schwarz, and underground Los Angeles artist and indie guitarist Art Zavala Jr. Train” with The String Revolution, we really tried to keep the energy and vibe of the original, but we wanted to put our own stamp on it,” says Robin “as my guitar teacher Randy Rhoads used to tell me – “don’t Try to play like me, play like you. I really took that to heart and I think TSR agreed with the same kind of thinking – Be true to the original but give it a new original twist, and that’s what I think we got do.

Steve Stevens was one of the most original guitarists on the ’80s rock scene, best known for his 41-year partnership with Billy Idol, his work on Michael Jackson’s “Dirty Diana,” his Grammy-winning performance on ” Top Gun Anthem” and his work with Vince Neil on “Exposed”. Stevens has also lent his unmistakable sound and style to many hit records including Pink “Try This”, Diana Ross “Eaten Alive”, Joni Mitchell “Chalk mark in a Rainstorm”, Robert Palmer “Don’t Explain”, The Thompson Twins “Here Come Future Days”, Ric Ocasek “This Side of Heaven”, Peter Criss “Let Me Rock You”, Juno Reactor “Shango”, “Hokata” and “Pistolero”, Kyosuke Himuro “Beat Haze Odyssey”, Steve Lukather “Lukather” and on his solo releases with Steve Stevens Atomic Playboys “Atomic Playboys”, Bozzio Levin Stevens “Black Light Syndrome” and “Situation Dangerous” and the critically acclaimed solo releases “Flamenco A Go Go” and ” Memory Crash”. Steven’s catalog of hit songs he co-wrote and performed alongside Idol include “Rebel Yell”, “Eyes Without A Face” and “Flesh for Fantasy”. They sound as fresh and relevant today as the day they were released, as evidenced by their recent cover by artists as varied as Miley Cyrus, Green Day, Queens of the Stone Age, Him, Black Veil Brides, Children of Bodom, Dope, Daughtry, Sum 41, Blink 182, Drowning Pool, Murderdolls, Deathstars, and The Donnas. Steven co-wrote the most recent Idol EP Roadside, produced by Butch Walker with collaborations with hit songwriters Sam Hollander, Tommy English, Joe Janiak and Grant Michaels. Stevens is currently working on new music with Idol and will hit the road with Idol this spring on their US Journey tour, then Europe where they will play major festivals in addition to dates where Idol will be supported by Go Go’s, then Rock n’ Rio alongside Green Day.

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Ahead of his show in Dallas, Martin Barre talks about his aversion to most music https://micgillette.com/ahead-of-his-show-in-dallas-martin-barre-talks-about-his-aversion-to-most-music/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/ahead-of-his-show-in-dallas-martin-barre-talks-about-his-aversion-to-most-music/ Of the nearly 55 years that Jethro Tull has existed as a rock ‘n’ roll ambassador of English flute-based folk music, 45 of those years have been carried by the muscular guitar drumming of Martin Barre. With a breath of fresh air into his own career and the relationship with the band that made him […]]]>

Of the nearly 55 years that Jethro Tull has existed as a rock ‘n’ roll ambassador of English flute-based folk music, 45 of those years have been carried by the muscular guitar drumming of Martin Barre. With a breath of fresh air into his own career and the relationship with the band that made him famous, the former Jethro Tull guitarist is set to bring his solo band to Arlington Music Hall.

At 8 p.m. on Thursday, January 27, Barre et co. celebrate the 50th anniversary of Tull’s historic album Scuba diving suit featuring a special guest appearance from former Jethro Tull drummer Clive Bunker and a performance of the iconic album in its entirety as well as other Tull favorites and selections from Barre’s recent solo triumphs.

Barre and Jethro Tull parted ways in 2012, when Ian Anderson, the band’s jester-like flautist frontman, decided to reconfigure the band as a solo effort. Over the next decade, Barre focused on songwriting and composing, something he had little opportunity to do in Jethro Tull.

“There was no availability because Ian was so prolific,” Barre said on the phone before a show in snowy Michigan. “Now I have a lot of space to do that. I’m always up for the challenge and very determined to become a better songwriter, arranger and music producer. I always try to improve what I have, as opposed to everyone’s “conclusions.” Everyone draws “conclusions” about music and what’s right and wrong, but I prefer mine for better or worse.

Surprisingly, despite the varied styles he’s covered with and without Jethro Tull, Barre says his own appetite for outside music is rather specific.

“Ninety-nine percent of the music I hear I don’t like,” he says. “I don’t like other guitarists, I don’t like the saxophone. If there’s one music I love, it’s classical music. I’ve always liked that, that’s what I listen to for fun.

Barre has said in the past that he avoids listening to other guitarists to preserve his own style of playing.

“I’ve been listening to great players for 50 years, and I admire what they do, but I don’t relate to it,” he says, “I don’t hear a guitarist and I think ‘I wish I could do that’ ‘, because I’m happy with what I can do. I’m not interested. I’m just trying to be a better music writer. In terms of acting, I think I’ve found my niche and I have no intention of leaving soon.

Whether this method of “conservation” is more or less effective than others, Barre says each person should have their own methods.

“I think you’re coming to the same place,” he said. “You can learn guitar by taking lessons or watching YouTube videos or by doing it yourself, but you end up in the same place.”

That being said, the remaining 1% that Barre enjoys is somewhat surprising.

“I love virtuoso bluegrass,” he says. “The banjo and mandolin music is fabulous. Folk music too, Scottish and Irish folk music. A tiny bit of blues. But classical music gives me everything I want. It contains all these genres, you just have to find them.

Since fully committing to his solo work, Barre has released four albums over the past decade and has more material on the way, a creative explosion from someone whose first songwriting credit (the song 1975 title Minstrel in the gallery, a credit shared with Anderson) entered six years into his tenure with the band and whose first credited single track came three years later (“Quatrain” from Tull’s live album To burst).

“I’ve done it more in the last few years because I had the motivation to do it,” Barre says. “I love writing music as a beginner. There’s a lot of room for improvement. If I have any aspirations in my career, it’s to be a better music writer.

Barre says he has no qualms that his new found love for songwriting may be overshadowed by the towering legacy of his life’s work.

“I use one to feed the other,” he says. “If I play Jethro Tull’s music to 5,000 people and I can play four of my own songs, that’s great. I’m happy to do that. I have no pretensions about why I’m here and why my audience is here, but deep down my music will always be more important to me. It will always be there under the surface. Writing a song that everyone knows, or bringing in a band and saying, “We’re playing one of your songs on stage,” would be the best thing that could happen to me. The rest is bread and butter.

As to whether he feels like his recent burst of creativity may lead to artistic burnout, Barre says he’s confident that won’t happen soon.

“I haven’t found it harder yet, but I know a lot of people whose songwriting has deteriorated,” he laughs. “I just hope it doesn’t happen to me for a long time and when it does, I’ll stop writing. It’s very hard to be honest with yourself, and it’s very hard to let go of something you’ve done all your life, but I’m very critical of what I do. I hope it stays that way.”

Barre says the postponement of live performances for the past two years has given her a break and allowed her to recharge creatively.

“I had a great two years at home because I was writing music, playing a lot of guitar, playing the flute, kind of catching up with life,” he says. “It didn’t bother me – financially it was a pig, but mentally it was quite refreshing. It’s a good thing to do at my age, just stop and take stock of everything. I’m fine The band is back, the four of us played in Florida for a few weeks, and now we have the girls and Clive with us, so it’s really great.

“I don’t hear a guitar player and I think ‘I wish I could do that’, because I’m happy with what I can do.” – Martin Barre

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Barre’s current band includes vocalist/guitarist Dan Crisp, bassist Alan Thompson, drummer Darby Todd, and vocalists Alex Hart and Becca Langsford providing vocals and additional instrumental backing.

“I’m just trying to give the audience what they paid to come see and hear,” Barre says. “If someone said to me, ‘I really like the way you do Tull’s stuff, but I’m not sure about your stuff’, I wouldn’t mind the least bit. I have no expectations of the If for 10 people who say there’s one person who says they’d like to know more about me, then that’s a great balance.

Although the past decade has been Barre’s first as a solo performer and writer, it’s not the first time he’s made music outside of Jethro Tull. He played guitar on a number of records over the years, including notable turns on solo albums by Ten Years After keyboardist Chick Churchill in 1973 and King Crimson bassist (and then-future Asian singer) John Wetton in 1980.

“I like working with other people,” Barre says. “Especially people I know nothing about, because it puts you in a very open position where you have to work hard and find something that works for them rather than for yourself. I think musicians who don’t get involved not in a challenge like this miss what music is.

Luckily for Barre, this creative mission and a bit of snow in the Midwest seem to be her only challenges in life at the moment. He greatly appreciates the camaraderie of his new group, and life on the road is something he’s been used to all his life.

“I make my home wherever I am,” he says. “I’ve done this all my life. It’s not particularly ideal, but wherever I lay my head, I call home. It is part of the nomadic way of life. For 50 years, I got used to it. It gets a bit sad, but basically it works for me. I love my things – my guitars, my car, my garden, my collection of steam engines – but other than that, I don’t miss them at all. They mean next to nothing, which is a healthy contrast. Nothing should matter so much from a materialistic point of view, so I can live without them.

Despite her inner peace without material possessions, Barre appreciates the presence of a kettle on the road. “With real milk,” he laughs.

Barre says he’s learned to appreciate the little things in life at this point – the privacy, the company of his family and bandmates, and the ability to stop and smell the roses once in a while. on the road. Every day, he runs for an hour in the city where he is.

“You see things other people don’t see when they’re just sitting in a hotel room; it’s the last thing I want to do,” Barre said. “I want to walk around and see what a place is. Most of the places I’ve been to so I know them, but I’m interested in where I am.

The nature of life on the road taught Barre a lot about life.

“People always say, ‘You’ve traveled everywhere,’ but not really, I just worked in lots of different places,” Barre explains. “We’ve played in India before, but I can’t really say I’ve ‘been’ to India. I’ve only been to the Sheraton in Mumbai, and that’s not India. It’s just America in India So I’m not a real traveler, but I do my best with what I have.

“Either you fight your situation or you accept it and enjoy it. We stop for a nice homemade breakfast if we can find a family restaurant. These are the things that make life easier, and they become more important than they normally would.”

As Barre is called in for what is sure to be a chilling soundcheck, he ends the conversation on a high note.

“I’m just happy with what I have,” he says. “Music keeps me busy. It’s my life, it doesn’t own me, but I certainly own it.

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Mulberry launches collaboration with Nicholas Daley https://micgillette.com/mulberry-launches-collaboration-with-nicholas-daley/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 11:07:20 +0000 https://micgillette.com/mulberry-launches-collaboration-with-nicholas-daley/ Mulberry has unveiled the latest iteration of its designer collaboration series Mulberry Editions featuring emerging London designer Nicholas Daley, who has designed a capsule of music-inspired bags and accessories. Daley, known for exploring his dual Jamaican and Scottish heritage and music, reinterpreted Mulberry’s classic unisex “Antony” satchel for the collaboration, as well as Mulberry’s first […]]]>

Mulberry has unveiled the latest iteration of its designer collaboration series Mulberry Editions featuring emerging London designer Nicholas Daley, who has designed a capsule of music-inspired bags and accessories.

Daley, known for exploring his dual Jamaican and Scottish heritage and music, reinterpreted Mulberry’s classic unisex “Antony” satchel for the collaboration, as well as Mulberry’s first foray into music accessories, complete with a guitar strap, a saxophone strap and a plectrum case.

For the capsule, Daley evoked the defining sound movements of the 1960s and 1970s era, the heyday of jazz, reggae and rock ‘n’ roll, updating the “Antony” with whipstitches, fringes and braided patterns in a nod to the outfits and accessories worn by Miles Davis, Roy Ayers and Jimi Hendrix on stage.

Image: Mulberry; Mulberry x Nicholas Daley

The bags come in five size options, including a new oversized iteration, and Daley has also updated Mulberry’s signature hardware, flipping his Postman’s Lock so the twist runs north-south and frames it. with fine embroidery.

The capsule’s tonal palette includes navy, ocher and oak, with contrasting panels of suede, grained leather and cotton canvas to echo the rich play of textures from the ready-to-wear collections. wear from Daley.

Mulberry x Nicholas Daley presents musical accessories for the first time

The collaboration also sees Daley bring his love of music to the forefront, with a series of luxury music accessories, a first for Mulberry, which have been created specifically with Daley’s close community of performing musicians in mind. .

Musical accessories include fringed guitar and saxophone straps, crafted in complementary suede tones, plus a plectrum case and bucket hat with embroidery techniques that echo handcrafted leatherwork found in South Africa. North and the Caribbean.

Image: Mulberry; Mulberry x Nicholas Daley

Commenting on the collection, Daley said in a statement: “This range was created with the musicians I’ve worked with in mind – almost like a wardrobe of accessories to wear on stage.

“Collaborating with Mulberry has been such a privilege. I’ve always felt a strong sense of alignment with the brand’s support of British craftsmanship, as well as its stance on sustainability. The team was so open and supportive in bringing new ideas to life, I’m thrilled that people are resonating with the pieces, loving them and wearing them for years to come.

Image: Mulberry; Mulberry x Nicholas Daley

The Mulberry x Nicholas Daley collection also highlights the British brand’s sustainable business practices, combining Mulberry’s ‘Made to Last’ philosophy with Daley’s community-based approach to design. Both the regular and oversized Antony models have been made in Mulberry’s carbon-neutral factories in Somerset, and all leathers and suedes used are accredited by the Leather Working Group, the world’s leading certification for responsible leather manufacturing.

Thierry Andretta, Managing Director of Mulberry, added: “We are proud to reveal Nicholas Daley’s chapter in Mulberry Editions. Daley’s vision for modern British craftsmanship, his passion for musical culture, together with his commitment to sustainable craftsmanship that shares our Made to Last philosophy, make him a truly exciting creative partner for Mulberry.

Image: Mulberry; Mulberry x Nicholas Daley

To mark the launch, Daley and Mulberry produced a film featuring the bags during a live jazz session, with a specially written composition by Sons of Kemet frontman Shabaka Hutchings, accompanied by Grammy-nominated artist Lianne Havana. The film also spotlights other artists from Daley’s “creative community” including Daisy George, Jasmine Kayser and Shirley Tettah, as well as a horn section featuring Grifton Forbes-Amos, Elijah Clarke and David Laleye- Thomas.

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The Mulberry x Nicholas Daley collection will launch in stores and on Mulberry.com on January 13. Prices range from £150 for the pick pouch to £1,795 for the oversized Antony.

Image: Mulberry; Mulberry x Nicholas Daley
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