play guitar – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 19:44:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://micgillette.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-2021-08-02T161817.082-150x150.png play guitar – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ 32 32 Heart’s Nancy Wilson teaches you how to play the notoriously difficult opener to “Crazy On You” https://micgillette.com/hearts-nancy-wilson-teaches-you-how-to-play-the-notoriously-difficult-opener-to-crazy-on-you/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 12:00:27 +0000 https://micgillette.com/hearts-nancy-wilson-teaches-you-how-to-play-the-notoriously-difficult-opener-to-crazy-on-you/ You can slip, pull, and pound like a beast, but be warned. You’re unlikely to be able to keep up with Heart’s Nancy Wilson, as she demonstrates how to play the intro to 1975’s “Crazy On You,” one of the greatest and most iconic opening guitar solos. trickiest in rock history. “I really wanted people […]]]>

You can slip, pull, and pound like a beast, but be warned. You’re unlikely to be able to keep up with Heart’s Nancy Wilson, as she demonstrates how to play the intro to 1975’s “Crazy On You,” one of the greatest and most iconic opening guitar solos. trickiest in rock history.

“I really wanted people to know from the start what I could do,” Wilson revealed in a 1999 interview with Acoustic guitar:

It was the same as sitting in the Bandwagon music store and playing (Paul Simon) Anji. It was like, “Look at me, I know stuff.”

As hard rock musicians in the 70s and 80s, Wilson and her partner/sister, lead singer and songwriter, Ann found themselves constantly having to prove themselves.

As Ann recently explained to The Guardian:

At the time, especially in the 70s, there was no filter on how women were sexualized – hyper-sexualized – to sell their images. Now, at least, it seems women are in control of their own filters. At the time, they didn’t. It was just like, “Hey, here’s a hot chick. We know how we can sell it.

Let’s all observe Women’s History Month by emphasizing that every bonehead who’s ever dismissed these trailblazing women as a “girl band” is paying close attention to Nancy’s complex “hybrid picking.”

“Crazy On You” finds her picking out a beat on the A string while using her bare fingers to pull notes off the B and G strings.

And by her own admission, she tends to never play it the same way twice. (“which makes it really easy, right? »)

While we’re at it, how about celebrating Heart’s 50th anniversary by introducing the next generation to “Crazy On You”?

Times have changed significantly, but the emotions that inspired the song will hit close to home for many young people, according to Ann’s description on the rock teacher’s YouTube channel:

I wrote the words about the state of the world and the stressful effect it had on me. At the time, we thought the world was really screwed up, right? Because the Vietnam War was on and we chose to do this, but staying out of our own country…we were homesick. Crime was increasing, gasoline was expensive, gasoline shortages, all those horrible things. We had no idea what was going to happen in the next few years, so it seemed like at that point, you know, the world was ending. It’s close to the apocalypse. It’s very, very stressful when you’re in your twenties and you don’t see a bright future.

If you’re committed to learning Nancy Wilson’s guitar intro to “Crazy On You,” we recommend Shutup & Play’s video tutorial and tabs.

via laughing squid

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Ayun Halliday is the chief primatologist of East Village Inky zine and author, most recently, of Creative, Not Famous: The Little Potato Manifesto. Am here @AyunHalliday.

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Moxai, young group from North Devon, want to do a gig https://micgillette.com/moxai-young-group-from-north-devon-want-to-do-a-gig/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/moxai-young-group-from-north-devon-want-to-do-a-gig/ Published: 00:00 7 March 2022 North Devon music news with Andy McAuley: Here’s another rising band I had the pleasure of meeting and getting the scoop on their new single ‘Feeling’ worth checking out… Hello Moxai, I hope you are doing well. If you want to introduce yourself and what you play in the band […]]]>

Published:
00:00 7 March 2022



North Devon music news with Andy McAuley:

Here’s another rising band I had the pleasure of meeting and getting the scoop on their new single ‘Feeling’ worth checking out…

Hello Moxai, I hope you are doing well. If you want to introduce yourself and what you play in the band

LG: Hi, my name is Lily Graver and I play drums.

LHP: Hi, I’m Lily Hanlon-Penny and I play bass.

C: Hello, I’m Cerys Hemmings and I sing and write the songs.

N: Hi, I’m Noah Houghton and I play guitar in the band but I play bass as a daily job.

Where and how did you all come together?

LG: I studied music at A level before starting the course where I met Cerys and Lily – and Ben! Cerys messaged me afterwards and we chatted. I tagged Cerys in a TikTok from a function band playing at a wedding, Lily saw this tag and we decided to start a band.

LHP: The TikTok video showed the feature band playing “Life Is A Highway” and we thought it was hilarious and thought it would be great to start a band after seeing how much fun it was.

C: Yes, we struggled for so long to find a guitarist but luckily we found Noah who was very close because he and I are together!

What are your musical or non-musical inspirations?

LHP: I feel like one of my biggest inspirations is Nothing but Thieves, me and Cerys were lucky enough to see them live.

LG: The punk genre inspires me a lot, especially the Riot Grrrl subgenre. I’m inspired by bands such as The Wood Burning Savages, Touts and Cherym. My music teachers and tutors encouraged and inspired me to look into music. I only started playing the drums three years ago!

C: I did my first solo in the choir when I was three and it really took off from there. I dabbled in musical theater and opera for a decade, then got into heavy alternative indie music, which helped me move away from my musical theater tone – but I’ll be forever grateful to my experience as a performer and my classical training. I like to take inspiration from soul singers like Ella Fitzgerald.

N: I’ve been playing bass for nine years, the Red Hot Chili Peppers were a huge thing for me when I started on bass so it’s only natural that I take inspiration from them now that I play guitar. There’s something about John Frusciante’s game that speaks to me. A lot of my inspiration comes from jazz, funk and soul, I just wish I could play guitar properly!

You just released your first single ‘Fleeing’, how was it and where did you record it?

C: “Fleeing” is a very special song for us. We thought it would create a community for those who have struggled with creepy individuals following them or those who have felt uncomfortable around people.

LG: As we are a relatively new band, we decided to do everything ourselves. Guitar, bass and vocals were recorded in Noah’s bedroom. He sent me the project to which I added drums and mixed and mastered. Distrokid helped me distribute “Fleeing” on Spotify, Apple Music, Soundcloud and YouTube. Fortunately, the timing worked out and we were able to release it on February 3. We’re going to release an EP this year, which will be a full studio recording.

What are your passions or hobbies outside of music?

LG: I’m a long-time supporter of Derby County Football Club – you’ll no doubt see me wearing a football top behind the drums! Otherwise, my interests are strongly rooted in music, whether it’s playing drums, bass or guitar, performing live, recording sessions, producing, journalism or break down !

LHP: I do a lot of different art styles and will help create eventual album covers, merchandise and anything art-based for the band.

C: I am an avid crystal collector, I have over 200 different types of crystals in all colors, shapes and sizes and I love all things spiritual.


Moxai at the Palladium Club
– Credit: Stuart McConnell

I saw that you had a few gigs under your belt, how did it go and what was the funniest or weirdest moment for the band?

LG: At our first gig, I rocked too hard and cut my finger. I had such an adrenaline rush that I didn’t even notice until afterwards. Things went well. Just hitting things up and hoping for the best.

LHP: I think at most I yell at others saying I don’t know what I’m doing!

C: Yeah, I remember bursting out laughing because Lily said she didn’t know what she was doing and Stuart from The Palladium took a picture of that moment on our Instagram.

What do you think of the music industry as a young band?

LG: Competition for bands doing it themselves has increased due to the rise of TikTok and other social media platforms; we use the DIY punk approach to our advantage. Our ages range from 16-19, so we know what appeals to people our age and post engaging content on our Instagram, TikTok and Facebook @MoxaiBand

LHP: I feel like since Covid there has been an increase in younger groups and we need to find ways to stand out from the rest

When and where will you play next?

LHP: We haven’t booked any concerts yet, but we hope to participate as soon as possible!

LG: We are now concentrating on writing new songs for our EP. Remember the name – it’s pronounced mok see

Keep rocking, rockers!

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Best Guitar Chords Easy at Best https://micgillette.com/best-guitar-chords-easy-at-best/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 17:00:26 +0000 https://micgillette.com/best-guitar-chords-easy-at-best/ Source: lessons.com From beach house to beethoven, chord progressions determine how a piece of music unfolds over time. How to read the beginner’s guide to guitarhobbi guitar chords from guitarhobbi.com also the animals didn’t exactly stick to the shape of the song and […] This guitar tutorial includes the. The […]]]>




















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The neurosurgeon who came to North Platte https://micgillette.com/the-neurosurgeon-who-came-to-north-platte/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 02:01:31 +0000 https://micgillette.com/the-neurosurgeon-who-came-to-north-platte/ North Platte neurosurgeon Lee Warren has served his time, practicing his profession under the toughest conditions. Warren was a combat surgeon in Iraq, enduring some of the most extreme physical and emotional challenges possible. Her journey of life, faith and war brought Warren to North Platte in May 2020, bringing an unprecedented level of expertise […]]]>

North Platte neurosurgeon Lee Warren has served his time, practicing his profession under the toughest conditions.

Warren was a combat surgeon in Iraq, enduring some of the most extreme physical and emotional challenges possible.

Her journey of life, faith and war brought Warren to North Platte in May 2020, bringing an unprecedented level of expertise in her field to Great Plains Health.

Not only did North Platte find a neurosurgeon, Warren found a home.

dr. Lee Warren

Warren grew up on a dirt road, coincidentally near another town named Broken Bow. This one was in Oklahoma. His grandfather was a cattle rancher, so in many ways Nebraska feels like home.
Coincidentally, he is now building a house on a dirt road outside of North Platte.

He moved here from Casper, Wyo., where the hospital was about to be purchased by a large medical system. He was not happy with the change of direction. He didn’t want to work in a big system, so it seemed like a good time to look around, he said.

He listed his availability in medical publications and he was contacted by a recruitment company seeking a neurosurgeon for Great Plains Health. He was certainly interested. He saw it as an opportunity to bring neurosurgery to a place that had never had it before.

“It seemed like a noble thing to do,” he said.

Warren and his wife Lisa are builders. Along with their new home, they’re almost ready to move into renovated offices and rooms at Great Plains Health’s Brain and Spine Clinic, designed by Lisa. The clinic is now in the Health Pavilion, but will be moving to the old 1975 hospital building, which is immediately east of the 2015-built hospital tower. The interior has been completely remodeled.

Lisa is an integral part not only of his life, but also of his profession, he said.

A lot of people know Warren because he’s not just a surgeon, he’s an author.

Warren has two published autobiographical books, which can be found at A to Z Books in North Platte. His third book is about to be published.

The books are award-winning and praised by best-selling writers who cover similar topics of how to keep your sanity and how to grow spiritually in the face of life’s most pressing challenges.

Max Lucado, who has written nearly 100 books with 130 million copies in print, wrote that “we can greatly benefit from his (Warren’s) wisdom”.

Spiritual writer Philip Yancey said that Warren “has a rarefied point of view, as he makes his living by penetrating into the most secluded – and sacred – part of a person – the human brain”.

Iraq

Warren’s first book, No place to hidetalks about his time in Iraq, where he treated wounded in a combat hospital made out of tents.

Warren takes the reader with him as he treats friends and foes alike, writing about the wounds he healed, the techniques he used, and his struggle to serve in the faith as the mortars exploded and vital supplies could not be counted. He wondered how God could allow war and why American surgeons should treat wounded terrorists, which everyone else did, along with coalition soldiers.

Regarding this last question, he was told that the medical profession in the United States, even in times of war, sustains life. And, he was assured that terrorists were sent to prison when they were well enough.

As for the first question, he faced the deadly challenge of accepting that he was not in control, and all he could do was do his best and let God do the rest, which is not an easy thing for us humans to accept.
Within a day, he saw someone die for lack of blood, heard the screams of badly burned men, and his phone call home went to voicemail.

He found himself angry with God, but also found solace in others at a church service in the tents, where he was politely but firmly recruited to be minister of music because he knew how to play the guitar.

His emotions ran the gamut of extremes. He did not control the events around him.

“I felt sculpted, sculpted,” he wrote. “Pieces of who I thought I was and how I thought about my life were being chipped away. I wondered what would be left after The Sculptor was finished.

Warren has the ability to write in detail, and he is also able to step back and look at his experiences. He wrote detailed emails home, capturing the details. His emails were so informative and captivating that they were distributed to tens, then hundreds and thousands of people across the United States, as readers shared them with friends and family.

He also writes about his uplifting experiences in Iraq, including helping a 13-year-old Iraqi girl who suffered from seizures. The family had no place to turn but the United States, and Warren was there.

Her emails led to a regular blog, which turned into her first book. By then, tens of thousands of people knew about Warren. His desire to communicate turned into Dr. Lee Warren’s podcast, which is now heard weekly in over 70 countries.

Back home

After five hair-raising, trying and introspective months in Iraq, Warren returned to the United States, where he continued to practice neurosurgery in calmer environments.

His second book, I saw the end of you, was released around the time it moved to North Platte. It was around this time in his life when conditions were more comfortable but dilemmas persisted. On the one hand, he had his faith in God and in the eternal life of the spirit, and on the other hand, his extensive knowledge of medicine made him fully aware of the limits of the human brain.

Sometimes knowledge can be too much for mere mortals, but we crave it, and our human spirit cries out for ways to make emotional sense of cold, hard facts.

In both books, he openly and emotionally describes the challenges he faces. The book is for people who want to see their faith awakened.

“Would you like to hear the thoughts of a brilliant surgeon?” If you answered yes, you are holding the right book. Enjoy,” Lucado wrote on the back cover.

Not only did Warren and his wife Lisa move to North Platte, but they also brought about 10 people with him – the core of his surgical team and staff.

Warren loves North Platte and plans to make it his permanent home. He feels “blessed to have this opportunity”, he told the Newsletter.

His desire to stay here speaks to the inherent appeal of North Platte, the growth of Great Plains Health, and the resources coming to west-central Nebraska.

This is good news for patients and good news for anyone who wants to share a journey of faith and learn more about this talented, down-to-earth, open and honest neurosurgeon. Much of his life is an open book or two, and continues through three.

For more information, see wleewarrenmd.com.

This report was first published in the January 26 print edition of the Bulletin.


© 2022 The North Platte Bulletin. All rights reserved.

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Get to know Julien Earle and his new project r3flection https://micgillette.com/get-to-know-julien-earle-and-his-new-project-r3flection/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 23:08:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/get-to-know-julien-earle-and-his-new-project-r3flection/ Julien Earle has spent years on the scene producing quality tracks and has now embarked on the next chapter of his story as r3flection. Since first appearing on the scene years ago, Julian Earle traveled through a number of different genre realms while creating immersive tunes. Beginning his journey in left field, he discovered a […]]]>


Julien Earle has spent years on the scene producing quality tracks and has now embarked on the next chapter of his story as r3flection.


Since first appearing on the scene years ago, Julian Earle traveled through a number of different genre realms while creating immersive tunes. Beginning his journey in left field, he discovered a passion for electronic beats after delving deeper into lo-fi sounds. This helped push him further into the underground as his exploration of techno began, leading to releases on top labels such as 1605, Kraftekand Respect.

After rising through the ranks for years, Julien Earle has also made it his goal to help others on their journey. This led to the creation of its YouTube page which is littered with tutorials for anyone keen to get into production. Whether it’s creating lo-fi beats and hard techno, answering questions, or replicating the styles of other notable producers on the scene, it’s a wealth of information for any producer in grass.

Today, at the start of 2022, Julien Earle has set his sights on the next stage of his career with the launch of his new pseudonym, reflection. The first sounds of this project were heard just a few weeks ago with the release of “fix my H3art“, a breathtaking track that will surely captivate all who listen to it. In addition, r3flection will also serve as a label for Julien to release more tracks as well as those of other artists.

Seeking to better understand the mind of Julien Earle, we caught up with him after the release of “Fix My H3art” to discuss the project and his plans for the future. Give her exclusive guest mix a spin and read on for the full conversation!

Stream EDMID Guest Mix 310 || Julien Earle / reflection on SoundCloud:


Hello Julien, thank you very much for taking the time to chat with us today. Let’s start by diving into your own roots as an artist! Who were your early influences and favorite artists on the dance music scene?

At first, I really dove into more left-wing stuff, not so much House or Techno. I really connected to Burial early on and loved Night Slugs, Tessella, R&S, that kind of stuff. It was also a different time from now when now 4×4 music is much bigger (it was early 2010s).

Honestly, all that super textural stuff from back in the day, even moving on to more electronics like Flying Lotus, James Blake, it all really appealed to me. I’m from rock, I play guitar, Emo house shows all of that so it really left-the field explorations of what could be done with the dance music model was the hook that caught me .

What made you start DJing and producing house and techno? Was there a certain “spark” that happened one day or was it a natural progression?

Lo-fi House around 2016-2017 really put me back in the game a bit. I think that’s when 4×4 started to get interesting again and people’s attention got really focused on the underground in terms of what was to come. I took the foundation that I had already built from doing all these other styles of music and really hammered it into trying to do the best stuff I could. A few years later, I’m still trying hard to do my best stuff every day, but I’ve come a long way and made my project a little bigger!

You have previously released music under your own name, Julien Earle, but have since started releasing new material under the name r3flection. What prompted this change and what can fans expect to hear under this alias?

This project represents everything I learned, all my influences, everything I want to do. It’s a “reflection” of everything I’ve ever consumed or wanted to do artistically. It’s also to separate my new and different ideas from videos and techno and keep them under one umbrella where you know it’s me Julien, but it’s also a different guy if that makes sense. I’m Julien, but my buddy r3flection. You really have to meet him.

The release of “Fix My H3art” marked the beginning of this new journey. Can you share what the production process was like behind this track?

This track is the first entry in the project, and it’s a new style for me. The genus is called 808 House. If you know you know. For me, creating a whole new genre from scratch isn’t very interesting, but it’s more interesting to take what’s going on, develop it, and hopefully take it to places no one else knows. no one else thought. This is house 808.

You can play it alongside all the Tech House and Piano House or even the Techno that people love, but when “Fix My H3art” comes along, you know it’s r3flection and you can’t mistake it for someone. another. So I could talk all day about the production techniques I’ve used, but that’s really just one tool I’ve used here to achieve the goals I’ve detailed above.

Not only is r3fection your new alias, but it also shares the name of your newly created fingerprint. What led you to create this new imprint and do you intend to include the work of other artists?

The goal of the label is simple: I want to do things that other labels just don’t care about, but I know there’s an audience for it. The principle I live by is that if you like something, there are at least 1,000 other people on the internet who will like it too. Even if it’s not as well produced as the bigger labels or something like that.

That being said, don’t get me wrong. r3flection’s standard of quality is as hard to match as any of the biggest labels, but we’ll take the chance and use the same promotional resources as those big labels to make sure the world hears it if they deserve it. . and it is quality. More artists will be released soon, we are having remix contests and I will open demos before the end of the year.

Julien Earle / reflection

In addition to your own work, you’ve helped develop other artists’ production abilities with your videos on YouTube. When did you decide to use this platform as a way to teach others and are there any specific videos you recommend we watch?

For me, it all really comes down to the Lo-fi house. I spent a few years being a big fan of YouTube, literally watching it all day while producing, and I really understood how it worked. I realized that there were almost no Lofi House tutorials, so that was my calling. I ended up expanding into other genres and here we are. It’s really about making the videos that I wish I had seen when I started.

In 2013 I WISHED someone would do a Burial tutorial, or a Flying Lotus tutorial, or a Tessella tutorial – and five years later, when those things still didn’t exist, I realized I had to to be the one to research these leads and do my best job of explaining what i learn from them so everyone can have those videos i was dying for at the time and eventually the production can be an easier process to learn and the overall quality of the track can be improved. Check out my first video on how to make Lofi House for a nice pre-crazy throwback trip Julien. [Laughs]

Finally, now that your new alias and label are known to the world, what goals do you hope to achieve in 2022 and beyond?

First of all, I’m going to keep working on these tracks, both on my own techno releases and on r3flection, and keep showing the world. I won’t stop until r3flection earns the space it deserves in this game. I’m also going to keep making videos every day so it doesn’t stop anytime soon. Also working on a secret project but the world will find out very soon. Thank you for!


Follow Julien Earle on social networks:

Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Instagram (r3flection) | SoundCloud | YouTube | Tic

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Gear Review: Orange Learn Adds Graded Rock Guitar Books https://micgillette.com/gear-review-orange-learn-adds-graded-rock-guitar-books/ Sat, 05 Feb 2022 19:53:53 +0000 https://micgillette.com/gear-review-orange-learn-adds-graded-rock-guitar-books/ Orange Amplification have been a pioneering force in guitar and bass amplification since the late 60s. Known for decades as the UK’s manufacturer of guitar amplifiers, their equipment can be found on stages and studios around the world. , inspiring some of the world’s greatest rock icons, including Jimmy Page, Stevie Wonder, James Brown, Fleetwood […]]]>

Orange Amplification have been a pioneering force in guitar and bass amplification since the late 60s. Known for decades as the UK’s manufacturer of guitar amplifiers, their equipment can be found on stages and studios around the world. , inspiring some of the world’s greatest rock icons, including Jimmy Page, Stevie Wonder, James Brown, Fleetwood Mac, Oasis and Madonna. But Orange Amps offers its customers much more than hardware. Their notable educational component, Orange Learn, offers many innovative learning tools, including a new series of graded rock guitar books for students looking for an alternative and enjoyable way to learn to play rock guitar.

The new graded books from Orange Learn have been written to work with and be supported by Orange’s online guitar lessons. Along with a wealth of musical information to guide students at different levels, the new books provide everything a student will need to take accredited rock guitar exams with global digital music exam provider, Online Music. Examinations (OME).

From Beginner to Grade 8, Orange Learn courses help students study on their own, with a teacher, or a combination of both. Each scorebook includes six songs; three to teach students how to play guitar solo and solo to a song, as well as three performance pieces. Throughout the series you’ll find classic tracks you’ll know from the Beatles, AC/DC, Nirvana, Metallica, Deep Purple, Oasis as well as the latest hit tracks from Arctic Monkeys, Greta Van Fleet, My Chemical Romance and Bullet for My Valentine. The most advanced notes, seven and eight, contain songs by Opeth, Joe Satriani and Rush. Each book comes with downloadable backing tracks that are easy to find in the Free Resources section of the Orange Learn website.

Part of an expanded Orange Learn curriculum, the website materials provide students with multiple complementary approaches to learning rock guitar, with materials covering scales, chords, hearing tests, melodic recall, sight reading and music theory. Orange Learn courses are designed to be flexible, fun and easy to follow, and are built by expert music teachers, allowing students to study and progress at their own pace.

Check out the new graded rock guitar review books or their discounted digital version HERE.

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The moment Steve Vai thought he would never play again https://micgillette.com/the-moment-steve-vai-thought-he-would-never-play-again/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 13:09:22 +0000 https://micgillette.com/the-moment-steve-vai-thought-he-would-never-play-again/ Steve Vai said he briefly believed he would never play guitar again while recovering from recent shoulder surgery. He had previously undergone back surgery, but then required a second operation which forced him to reschedule their 2022 tour plans at the fall. In a new interview with FaceCulture (video below), he revealed that there was […]]]>

Steve Vai said he briefly believed he would never play guitar again while recovering from recent shoulder surgery.

He had previously undergone back surgery, but then required a second operation which forced him to reschedule their 2022 tour plans at the fall. In a new interview with FaceCulture (video below), he revealed that there was a time when he thought things were much worse.

“The shoulder started years ago and it was something I was going through when I was training,” said Vai, who released the latest album Inviolate on Jan. 28. weren’t going to work and they had to go in and fix it. And they did, and they did a great job. And it healed. And I did Inviolate. Unfortunately, over the summer I tore another tendon, and that’s why we had to move the US leg of the tour to the fall, because I had to have another surgery.

He added that he hadn’t been worried about the development, but continued: “[T]There was a point after removing the sling where I started trying to play and there was nothing. I couldn’t choose, I couldn’t scratch. And I thought, ‘Okay, that’s the end of the day for a musician.’ And for about 10 seconds, that thought – ‘This is it; I’m done’ – it was in my head. And I can honestly tell you that with that thought, there was no fear. But there was a disappointment, of course.

Vai explained that he “wasn’t devastated” because he knew he could continue to express himself using other outlets if the guitar was no longer available to him. “I don’t define myself as just a guitarist,” he said. “Music is not my life – music is something I do for a living. Life is much bigger than what you do in it. So I never felt limited in expressing creative musical ideas, even though I didn’t have a guitar, and I always knew it was going to be there no matter what.

“But then another little voice came in, the voice of my higher self – it usually comes to the rescue – and it said, ‘Shut the fuck up and start playing. You know you have this. And I said, ‘Okay. Yes sir!’ And I just started, and it came back.

Watch Steve Vai talk to FaceCulture

Top 100 Classic Rock Artists

Click to find out how they rank, as we count down the top 100 classic rock artists.

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Guitar Chords from Best Part Jennie to Best https://micgillette.com/guitar-chords-from-best-part-jennie-to-best/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 11:07:10 +0000 https://micgillette.com/guitar-chords-from-best-part-jennie-to-best/ Best Part Jennie Guitar Chords. So this chord is basically an F major chord that already contains an A note (which is the 2nd fret of the G string) and. Here is the main riff: Celromance Please Let Me Let Me Get What I Want Chords from celromance.blogspot.com Use a mixing console in pro version. […]]]>

Best Part Jennie Guitar Chords. So this chord is basically an F major chord that already contains an A note (which is the 2nd fret of the G string) and. Here is the main riff:

Celromance Please Let Me Let Me Get What I Want Chords from celromance.blogspot.com

Use a mixing console in pro version. 262,507 views, favorited 7,003 times. Chords of the best part of Daniel Caesar for guitar, ukulele and piano!!

Celromance Please Let Me Let Me Get What I Want Chords

Chordify is your #1 platform for chords. Chordify is your #1 platform for chords. [intro:h.e.r.] d am bm gm oh, ey [verse1:h.e.r.] d you don’t know baby i’m when you hold me bm and kiss me slowly gm that’s the sweetest thing d and it doesn’t change her]oh, hey [verse 1:






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Community Music School Announces Spring Programs and New Principal https://micgillette.com/community-music-school-announces-spring-programs-and-new-principal/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 13:53:40 +0000 https://micgillette.com/community-music-school-announces-spring-programs-and-new-principal/ Appalachian Community Orchestra Appalachian State University’s Community Music School (CMS) is beginning another semester of exciting music programs in Boone and Hudson this spring under new Principal Lisl Doughton. Activities are available for a variety of ages and experience levels. Registration is now open at music.appstate.edu/cms. Most programs begin the week of January 31. CMS […]]]>
Appalachian Community Orchestra

Appalachian State University’s Community Music School (CMS) is beginning another semester of exciting music programs in Boone and Hudson this spring under new Principal Lisl Doughton. Activities are available for a variety of ages and experience levels.

Registration is now open at music.appstate.edu/cms. Most programs begin the week of January 31. CMS offers “Pay What You Can” options for group classes.

Programs in Boone – Youth and Adults

In Community Drumming, Dr. Shawn Roberts will lead participants ages 4 and up in rhythms from around the world on drums from the Hayes School of Music. Families are invited to register together and make music

In the Appalachian Community Orchestra, musicians ranging from middle schoolers to professors play great orchestral music side by side. Will Selle and Taryn Wooten, band and orchestra directors at Watauga High School, lead the orchestra, which is open to ages 12 through adults. Advanced musicians can also audition for the Orchester symphonique des Appalaches, conducted by Dr. Régulo Stabilito.

Community members have long been essential to the Appalachian Choir, now led by Dr. Meg Stohlmann. No audition is required and any singer capable of playing their part in four-part harmony is welcome. The Appalachian Chorale will perform Will Todd’s “Mass in Blue,” an innovative jazz-style mass, and Zoom with the composer this spring.

Private lessons are now available in person at the Broyhill Music Center and online. App State students, faculty, and alumni are among the many private course instructors offering courses through CMS. Tuition assistance may be available for CMS courses.

Boone Programs – Youth

The Appalachian Youth Chorale (AYC), CMS’s longest running group program, invites students ages 7-14 to discover their voices in a singing community led by Dr. Meg Stohlmann and supported by voice students from the Hayes School of Music. Watauga High School Choir Director (and Teacher of the Year) Brandon Winbush is the ensemble’s collaborating pianist. This spring, AYC will perform songs inspired by Star Wars, The Wizard of Oz, Disney and Dr. Seuss.

App Rocks! is a rock band program for ages 10-14 led by Dr. Katy Strand. Students learn to sing on a microphone, play electric guitar and bass, and play keyboard and drums, spending time on each instrument as they learn and perform hit songs.

Let’s play the piano! offers two levels of class in the Piano Lab at Broyhill Music Center, led by Jenna Kyber and Julie Goforth. A fun and supportive environment builds students’ skills and enthusiasm for the piano.

Let’s play the ukulele! and play the guitar! are taught by Tanner McAteer, a graduate student in classical guitar performance. Students explore starting techniques on these versatile instruments and develop a musical avenue for self-expression.

Lisl Doughton becomes Head of Community Music School

Lisl Doughton

Lisl Kuutti Doughton became the new director of the Community Music School (CMS) at Appalachian State University in December 2021. Cellist and App State graduate, Doughton brings a lifelong love for music to her work as management of CMS.

“As part of the Hayes School of Music and the App State, CMS is uniquely positioned to make music education affordable for everyone while maintaining music as a profession,” says Doughton. “CMS employs twenty App State students, thirteen faculty and staff, and ten alumni in addition to excellent local teachers. We take a long-term view of the entire musician’s life cycle.

From 2019-2021, Doughton served as Program Manager for the Community Music School, managing enrollment and aspects of policies, advertising, budgets and payroll. During this time, under the leadership of Dr. Nicole Sonbert, CMS has grown into a vibrant music community offering private lessons and group programs for all ages.


About Community Music School

In conjunction with Appalachian State University’s Hayes School of Music, Community Music School (CMS) offers music lessons, ensembles, and private lessons for all ages and skill levels. CMS’s mission is to connect, create, engage and empower through music, fostering a vibrant community where diversity is valued and everyone is included in music creation. To increase access to music education for all, CMS offers Pay What You Can options for group programs and tuition assistance for private lessons. music.appstate.edu/cms

About Hayes School of Music

The Hayes School of Music prepares young musicians for professional life as performers, composers, music teachers, music therapists, conductors and music industry professionals, ensuring the next generation of musical leadership for the state, region and nation. Noted for the quality teaching provided by nationally and internationally recognized faculty musicians, the school offers four undergraduate degree programs and three graduate degree programs. Learn more at https://music.appstate.edu.

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Nvidia falls flat as Arm deal flounders https://micgillette.com/nvidia-falls-flat-as-arm-deal-flounders/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 18:55:45 +0000 https://micgillette.com/nvidia-falls-flat-as-arm-deal-flounders/ This article is an on-site version of our #techFT newsletter. Sign up here to receive the full newsletter straight to your inbox every weekday Nvidia shares fell 10% on Monday before ending the day flat on the Nasdaq roller coaster, but are down more than 5% today on company-specific news that the chip designer Arm’s […]]]>

This article is an on-site version of our #techFT newsletter. Sign up here to receive the full newsletter straight to your inbox every weekday

Nvidia shares fell 10% on Monday before ending the day flat on the Nasdaq roller coaster, but are down more than 5% today on company-specific news that the chip designer Arm’s deal could be dead.

Bloomberg reports that Nvidia is “quietly preparing to give up
its purchase of Arm Ltd. to SoftBank Group Corp. after making little or no progress in gaining approval”.

Regulators in the US, UK, Europe and China are expected to give the go-ahead, but there has been growing opposition to the cash and share deal initially valued at $40 billion in September 2020.

Last month, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission filed a lawsuit to block the deal to “prevent a chip conglomerate from choking off the innovation pipeline for next-generation technologies.” The UK launched an investigation into the deal on national security grounds in November after its Competition and Markets Authority expressed “serious competition concerns” over the summer. The European Union launched an investigation in October saying Nvidia ownership “could lead to restricted or degraded access to Arm’s IP.”

There were major doubts from the start that this deal would ever be done. Arm is the Switzerland of the semiconductor world, providing the core chip designs that everyone in the industry depends on to use and adapt. The prospect of a single chip company controlling it raised a massive red flag with regulators and created a firestorm of criticism from Nvidia’s rivals.

Failing the deal would hurt both Nvidia and Arm owner SoftBank. Nvidia would lose its “deposit” of a $1.25 billion severance fee and $750 million license consideration paid to SoftBank, while the Japanese company would have missed the stock price in full rise of Nvidia doubling the value of the transaction to more than 80 billion dollars.

SoftBank’s plan B is expected to be an IPO for Arm. This could still represent a good return on his investment. It paid £24 billion ($32 billion) for Arm in 2016, but the company’s value has been bolstered by semi-shortages over the past two years. They underscored the critical importance to nations and multiple industries of chips, and those who design their beating hearts.

The Internet of (five) things

1. Google changes course on cookies
Google is ditching the Floc technology it was building to replace advertising cookies and will instead use a method of tracking user interests known as Topics, to allay industry concerns. On Tuesday, Google acknowledged that Floc may not be doing enough to protect the identity of individuals online and not making it easy enough for people to understand or control how their data is used.

2. Technical reset is uneven
The big rout in tech stocks is proving uneven, says Lex. Cryptocurrency platform Coinbase is down 45%, following the trajectory of bitcoin’s decline, but tech giants such as Alphabet have lost around a tenth of their market value. The latter is a safer bet with rising free cash flow and strong net cash.

3. Department of Justice Antitrust Warning
Jonathan Kanter, in one of his first speeches as head of the US Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division, warned that he would seek to block more anti-competitive deals. The FT View is that Microsoft has taken on a juicy challenge with its deal to buy Activision Blizzard. Things get tough for Big Tech on Capitol Hill, too.

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#techFT brings you news, commentary and analysis on the big companies, technologies and issues shaping this industry’s fastest movement from specialists based around the world. Click here to get #techFT in your inbox.

4. China is launching a campaign to “purify” the web
China has launched a month-long campaign to clean up online content during next week’s Lunar New Year festival, as part of its latest push to reshape behavior on the internet. China’s Cyberspace Administration, the country’s top internet regulator, has ordered officials to sweep up ‘illegal content and information’ and target celebrity fan groups, online abuse, money worship , influential kids and media site homepages.

5. Muzmatch by naming tiff with Match
Over the past year, the Muslim marriage app, with 5 million users worldwide, has fought a future-threatening lawsuit brought by dating giant Match Group. which owns much larger services including Match.com, OkCupid, Tinder, and Hinge. The UK Intellectual Property Court is expected to rule on the matter in the coming weeks.

Tech Tools — Music From Scratch with Mictic

Mictic wristbands allow you to rock out, without having to set up loud drums and a guitar in your living room, writes Cristina Criddle. The Swiss start-up has created a pair of wearable devices that, with an app, let you play different invisible instruments while locking yourself to a backing track, using the movement of your hands to change notes and speeds.

The wristbands use Bluetooth to connect to your smartphone and have sensors to detect movement and gestures. Depending on the instrument, users will have different movements to play with. Each option comes with a short video tutorial, but it takes some practice to master. Currently, users can choose from Hip Hop, Trap, Latin, and EDM genres for backing music, and choose to play guitar, drums, cello, piano, or theremin.
The product launched in November and attracted investment from musician Moby. He hopes to add new genres, tracks and instruments to his app this year.

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