lot people – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 19:42:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://micgillette.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-2021-08-02T161817.082-150x150.png lot people – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ 32 32 Early Access Battle Bands Impressions – For Those About To Rock https://micgillette.com/early-access-battle-bands-impressions-for-those-about-to-rock/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 15:00:45 +0000 https://micgillette.com/early-access-battle-bands-impressions-for-those-about-to-rock/ In recent years, cartoon deck building games have been very popular. Most games stick pretty closely to the kill the arrow formula, but I don’t think I’ve seen one that tried to change things as drastically as battle bands. The premise is simple: you play as the sole member of a four-person rock band against […]]]>

In recent years, cartoon deck building games have been very popular. Most games stick pretty closely to the kill the arrow formula, but I don’t think I’ve seen one that tried to change things as drastically as battle bands. The premise is simple: you play as the sole member of a four-person rock band against another rock band. It takes one of two forms. The first is a random mode where you create a party and fight AI boss type enemies. And the other has you in a series of matches against other human players.

Once you’ve started, battle bands introduces you to the tutorial. You are put in a pre-made band as a guitarist. The bottom line is that both groups must compete for one of them to emerge victorious. Your group must reach 100 hype. To gain Hype, a band must have an active Song Section card. There are four members in each band, consisting of a guitarist, bassist, drummer, and keyboardist. Each of the four has instrument-specific song sections that they can set up, or common song sections that can be in anyone’s deck.

Once a song section is defined, a number of performance cards can be played. Party members have a certain amount of energy, which allows them to play cards in their deck. Each performance card increases the hype of a group. You can also play certain cards that reduce the hype of the opposing group or have other effects. If a party member runs out of cards but still has energy, they can choose to give that energy to another member. It’s an interesting setup that makes some sense, given the premise.

Prints Battle Strips 2

rock and reign

When you start a campaign, you can create a new group or join an existing one. This mode allows you to join three other players or just play with bots. You can even tell the bots what to do via battle bands‘ chat functionality. The campaign puts you in a van and has you choose places to go on a map. These tend to provide opportunities for new maps or enemy warbands to face. Opposed groups often have fewer members, but they are thematic. One is the Goo Fighters, which is a group made up of slimes. Another has you scrambling on a trailer on the open road as the background scrolls by. There is a fair amount of creativity involved.

The thing is, whether or not battle bands worth picking up at launch is based purely on playerbase size. I like the concepts and the systems are interesting. But this game is not so fun in single player. You can really only play a few cards here and there before spending a few minutes waiting until you can get going again.

It would certainly be different with seven other people in a session, but finding that many people might be difficult at launch. The game will need a lot of people for anyone to find matches. That’s a pretty big risk and there’s not even a full comments page in the general discussions on the game’s Steam forum. Of course, word of mouth could definitely grow. battle bands, as it just entered Early Access. It might also be worth it for people playing through the campaign with three friends, but the focus is obviously on the larger multiplayer. One thing’s for sure, though: it’s a long way to the top, if you want to rock ‘n roll.

Prints Battle Strips 3

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Keith Richards and The X-Pensive Winos: the singer joins the group after 3 decades https://micgillette.com/keith-richards-and-the-x-pensive-winos-the-singer-joins-the-group-after-3-decades/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 23:51:13 +0000 https://micgillette.com/keith-richards-and-the-x-pensive-winos-the-singer-joins-the-group-after-3-decades/ Keith Richards and X-Pensive Winos once again performed on stage for the first time in nearly 30 years. Fans of New York’s Beacon Theater attended his highly anticipated solo band reunion at the annual charity concert, Love Rocks NYC. Richards met three of the four surviving members of X-Pensive Winos at the event – ​​drummer […]]]>

Keith Richards and X-Pensive Winos once again performed on stage for the first time in nearly 30 years.

Fans of New York’s Beacon Theater attended his highly anticipated solo band reunion at the annual charity concert, Love Rocks NYC.

Richards met three of the four surviving members of X-Pensive Winos at the event – ​​drummer Steve Jordan, guitarist Waddy Wachtel and Ivan Neville. The band’s lead singer, Sarah Dash, died in September 2021, while bassist Charley Drayton is currently part of Bob Dylan’s “Rough and Rowdy Ways” tour.

the Rolling Stones guitarist expressed how much he missed playing with them. When Laurence Fishburne introduced the two acts, Richards took the time to talk about his love for the blues and how his band introduced it to several notable musicians like Little Walter, John Lee Hooker and Muddy Waters, among others. .

“It really connected me to something,” he said. “This blues music, it really is everybody’s music. Everybody’s got the blues, man. Everybody. There’s a lot of people in the world that are hurting. We’re gonna kick it.”

Richards and the X-Pensive Winos started their performance with “999” from the 1992 LP, “Main Offender”, followed by “You Got the Silver”, “Let It Bleed” and “Some Girls”.

Although their Love Rocks reunion was their first performance in 30 years, they previously performed together at the Apollo Theater’s Great Night in Harlem Benefit in 2015.

Keith Richards, The X-Pensive Winos a perfect combination

Before standing on a stage again, Richards spoke candidly about the group and applauded the limbs to be incredibly versatile.

“I could change or they would change themselves – only Waddy and I would stay with guitars, everyone would say ‘Okay, I’ll play bass, you play drums’…and fix it I was amazed by the versatility of these men,” he said. Gold mine.

READ ALSO: Phil Collins Health Issues: Drummer’s Shocking Problems Explained

Richards also told the outlet that The X-Pensive Winos became the best band he’s ever played with on a solo tour. According to the musician, he enjoyed his work with the Winos so much before showering the members with heartfelt compliments.

For example, he called Drayton an incredible bassist and drummer. She also agreed that Dash had incredible range despite having a cold the night before recording something.

His decades-long career led him to earn a nickname from Rolling Stone, calling him the “maker of rock’s greatest body of riffs” on guitar. He also ranked fourth on his list of Top 100 best guitarists.

READ MORE: Billy Joel Biopic receives disapproval from the musician himself? The truth

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Why Korn’s Jonathan Davis doesn’t scat more often https://micgillette.com/why-korns-jonathan-davis-doesnt-scat-more-often/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 15:48:37 +0000 https://micgillette.com/why-korns-jonathan-davis-doesnt-scat-more-often/ Korn are without a doubt one of the most distinctive bands in heavy music history, and much of their uniqueness is the result of frontman Jonathan Davis’ many talents. The singer admitted that he doesn’t scat or play bagpipes much anymore, and explained why in an interview with the daily beast. Funny enough, “scat singing” […]]]>

Korn are without a doubt one of the most distinctive bands in heavy music history, and much of their uniqueness is the result of frontman Jonathan Davis’ many talents. The singer admitted that he doesn’t scat or play bagpipes much anymore, and explained why in an interview with the daily beast.

Funny enough, “scat singing” actually originated in the jazz genre, according to the jazz academy. Jazz icons such as Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald were known for their ability to create “wordless syllables and sounds” as a means of vocal improvisation.

Davis has used his signature scatting on many previous Korn albums, but not so much on more recent ones. He also occasionally takes out the bagpipes when the band performs live, but only occasionally.

“I could do this shit for hours. I don’t do a lot of bagpipes and I don’t do a lot of fucking scat because everyone wants me to, and if I do too much it’s gonna burn out “, said the singer. Explain. “When I do it, it’s special. I do it on every record, it’s just one song and not everything.”

Fans of another act won’t see Davis or Korn involved much more playing their 1994 debut album in full, which they did on their 2014 tour to celebrate the record’s 20th anniversary. The frontman recalled that he revisited much of his childhood trauma when the band wrote the album, and the final product was quite grim as a result.

“It was taboo back then to talk about that shit. But whatever. I had to put it out. It helped a lot of people. It was a crazy time, and when I think about that record…it’s a such a fucking dark record,” he acknowledged. “We played it in its entirety in 2014, for its 20th anniversary, and we all walked off stage and looked at each other and said, ‘God, this record is dark’. We didn’t have it played in its entirety for ages. And I don’t want to play that record again. Damn no.

Korn’s tour with Chevelle and Code Orange continues tonight (March 11) in Greensboro, NC. Check out the dates here, and maybe you’ll get a chance to catch the lucky show where Davis brings back some of his abilities.

Jonathan Davis of Korn Live

Top 50 Nu-Metal Albums of All Time

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The RMEF joins the fight against the Center for Biological Diversity https://micgillette.com/the-rmef-joins-the-fight-against-the-center-for-biological-diversity/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 22:29:38 +0000 https://micgillette.com/the-rmef-joins-the-fight-against-the-center-for-biological-diversity/ The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, headquartered in Missoula, announced this week that it is joining several other organizations in a lawsuit against The Center for Biological Diversity on access to public land. RMEF spokesman Mark Holyoak spoke to KGVO News on Wednesday. “We have a lot of people we agree with, but we’ve only partnered […]]]>

The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, headquartered in Missoula, announced this week that it is joining several other organizations in a lawsuit against The Center for Biological Diversity on access to public land.

RMEF spokesman Mark Holyoak spoke to KGVO News on Wednesday.

“We have a lot of people we agree with, but we’ve only partnered with a few of them regarding a lawsuit brought by an environmental organization, the Center for Biological Diversity,” said Holyoak. “They seek to prevent public access to much of our National Wildlife Refuge land, worth more than 2.3 million acres.”

Holyoak explained why the RMEF is joining the lawsuit.

“We’re just letting people know that’s just not the way things should be,” he said. “These are public lands. They must be open to hunting and fishing. Hunting and fishing play a key role in wildlife management and help biologists track wildlife numbers, and so we throw our hats in the ring and say this is a bad decision, and we want just letting people know we are involved and more importantly speaking on behalf of our members to make this happen.

Holyoak said the Center for Biological Diversity is “in the business of legal action” and explained RMEF’s position.

“Well, I guess two fronts. The first is that it’s just kind of what they do. They are in the business of litigation. That’s how they roll. And the other is that they throw out some obscure species and say that hunting and fishing would wipe them out across the country generally, but that’s just not how it works.

Holyoak named the organizations the RMEF has partnered with in the lawsuit.

“The others were the Safari Club, the International Sportsman’s Alliance and the National Rifle Association,” he said. “A lot of these groups are deeply hunter-based and involve hunters. So on this issue, we definitely agree with them and others and so it was just kind of a joint effort that we’re all saying, hey, you know what? Fish and Wildlife Service, we’re behind you, and our members are behind you. We are for regulated hunting and public access.

The Center for Biological Diversity wants to thwart access to hunting and fishing on 2.3 million acres of public land spread across 106 national wildlife refuges and hatcheries.

WATCH: John Dutton’s Yellowstone Ranch is real and here are 12 photos

10 Facts About “Yellowstone” You Probably Didn’t Know

How big is a fan Yellowstone are you? These 10 facts about the Paramount Network show are sure to surprise even the most devoted viewers. They relate to almost all actors and their real passions and roles. John’s children? Beth’s accent? Rainwater’s guitar playing? Tate spoilers? It’s all part of this list of 10 facts you probably didn’t know about Yellowstone.

Every restaurant in Montana that’s been featured on Food Network

It’s always great to see something from your hometown or state on TV. When Food Network comes to town, Montananese are ready. These restaurants were featured.

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‘Flapping fists, jumping feet’ | Winter Jam 22 performs an “energetic” concert at Penn State’s BJC | Way of life https://micgillette.com/flapping-fists-jumping-feet-winter-jam-22-performs-an-energetic-concert-at-penn-states-bjc-way-of-life/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 17:17:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/flapping-fists-jumping-feet-winter-jam-22-performs-an-energetic-concert-at-penn-states-bjc-way-of-life/ From sparklers and flamethrowers to thousands of heads bowed in prayer, Winter Jam 22 welcomed members of the community to listen to various Christian musicians perform. The free concert took place at the Bryce Jordan Center on Friday, although attendees were encouraged to donate $10 upon admission. Acts included Skillet, Tauren Wells, KB, Colton Dixon, […]]]>

From sparklers and flamethrowers to thousands of heads bowed in prayer, Winter Jam 22 welcomed members of the community to listen to various Christian musicians perform.

The free concert took place at the Bryce Jordan Center on Friday, although attendees were encouraged to donate $10 upon admission.

Acts included Skillet, Tauren Wells, KB, Colton Dixon, I Am They, NewSong, Shane Pruitt, Abby Robertson and Bayside Worship, according to the tour’s website.

Additionally, actor Kevin Quinn – with notable roles in Disney Channel’s “Bunk’d” and the movie “A Week Away” – sang his latest single, “It’s About Time.”

During the PreJam, Bayside Worship performed, followed by Abby Robertson and Megan Duke.

“Let it go for God,” Duke said.

Abby Robertson sang her new single ‘Without Your Love’ before a Liberty University spokesperson spoke to the audience.

I Am They kicked off the show with their song “Faithful God.”

“Look at you all beautiful humans,” said Matthew Hein of I Am They.

The band went on to play four more songs before DJ GBaby took the stage for his intro.

NewSong followed the promotion of CONQER MUSIC – a minority-owned music and video platform “based on biblical principles”, the CONQER website said.

The band NewSong added a bit of country to the night of worship.

“External vocals only,” said a NewSong member.

Colton Dixon joined NewSong on stage for a combined performance of “Arise my Love.”

A spokesperson for Who’s Your One asked the public if they know “anyone who doesn’t know God”.

“We have something that Amazon cannot offer – the love of Jesus Christ,” the spokesperson said.

When KB entered the scene, the BJC bumps.

KB began rapping his hits like “Not Today Satan” and finished with the much-loved “Church Clap.”

During his set, KB asked the audience if he had been the victim of “generational criticism” on social media and in real life.






Christain Hip Hop artist KB preforms his set at Winter Jam, the self-proclaimed “Greatest Christian Music Tour” on Friday, March 4, 2022, at the Bryce Jordan Center in University Park, Pennsylvania.




Often, says KB, the faith of the younger generation is challenged by older generations.

“Let’s go pump your fists and jump your feet,” KB said. “We are right here.”

During “Church Clap”, KB asked the audience to create a “historic ride”, “lose [their] spirits” and “shake the building”.

KB ended their performance with the song “100” along with a short rap.

“My happy wife, Jesus loves me,” KB said. “I have nothing left to conform to.”

Another Liberty University spokesperson spoke about the university and said he knows “the one thing that can bring generations together.”

“It’s ‘Fireflies’ from Owl City,” he said during the song’s opening notes.

After “Fireflies,” evangelism speaker Shane Pruitt discussed the idea of ​​having a purpose in life.

Pruitt said “the word of God is Jesus” and asked the audience to “repent [their] sins” with them.

“Jesus is a better savior than we are sinners,” Pruitt said.

Tauren Wells danced on stage alongside his Christian pop songs.

After performing “Hills and Valleys,” Wells said “Thank You, Jesus” as he gazed up at the ceiling.

Another spokesperson for Compassion International, a humanitarian aid organization, shared his story with the adoption and sponsorship of a child in Kenya.

Compassion International volunteers distributed flyers to interested members of the public.

For those who made the first month’s deposit to sponsor a child, they were able to attend a special post-event “outing” with John Cooper, lead singer of Skillet.

During intermission, 14-year-old Ella Whyssler said her group of high school kids from Mount Union, Pennsylvania attended the concert together.

“Everything is so lively and energetic,” Whyssler said. “It’s like being with my second family.”

To begin the second half of the performance, Colton Dixon once again took the stage to perform, followed by Abby Robertson.







Dixon Winter Jam

Singer-songwriter Colton Dixon performs at Winter Jam, the self-proclaimed “greatest tour in Christian music,” Friday, March 4, 2022, at the Bryce Jordan Center in University Park, Pennsylvania.




NewSong’s Russ Lee shared the tour story – and mentioned that the band’s next location will be in Cleveland, Ohio.

“How many of you know that the people of Ohio need Jesus? Lee said. “Don’t hate them, pray for them.”

For the finale, Skillet brought energy to BJC as everyone stood up as the members entered the stage.

“Looks like you guys are ready to rock and roll,” Cooper said.

As the guitarists’ platforms rose and fell, fire erupted from the machines behind Cooper and the drummer.

During Skillet’s performance of his latest album “Dominion”, Cooper had fog machines strapped to his wrists.

“A lot of people have asked us why we named our album ‘Dominion,'” Cooper told the audience. “Because it looks sick.”

As the rest of Skillet’s band members left the stage, Cooper stayed onstage to discuss social media issues forcing young children to “deny” their spiritual “truths.”

“Parents, your children are being molested seven days a week,” Cooper said. “God is the only one who should make the rules.”

Cooper continued to discuss the “false ideologies” presented to young audiences on social media.

After Skillet’s performance, the hosts ended the concert with a prayer.

“It’s not just a concert,” Lee said. “It’s a spiritual movement.”

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The neurosurgeon who came to North Platte https://micgillette.com/the-neurosurgeon-who-came-to-north-platte/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 02:01:31 +0000 https://micgillette.com/the-neurosurgeon-who-came-to-north-platte/ North Platte neurosurgeon Lee Warren has served his time, practicing his profession under the toughest conditions. Warren was a combat surgeon in Iraq, enduring some of the most extreme physical and emotional challenges possible. Her journey of life, faith and war brought Warren to North Platte in May 2020, bringing an unprecedented level of expertise […]]]>

North Platte neurosurgeon Lee Warren has served his time, practicing his profession under the toughest conditions.

Warren was a combat surgeon in Iraq, enduring some of the most extreme physical and emotional challenges possible.

Her journey of life, faith and war brought Warren to North Platte in May 2020, bringing an unprecedented level of expertise in her field to Great Plains Health.

Not only did North Platte find a neurosurgeon, Warren found a home.

dr. Lee Warren

Warren grew up on a dirt road, coincidentally near another town named Broken Bow. This one was in Oklahoma. His grandfather was a cattle rancher, so in many ways Nebraska feels like home.
Coincidentally, he is now building a house on a dirt road outside of North Platte.

He moved here from Casper, Wyo., where the hospital was about to be purchased by a large medical system. He was not happy with the change of direction. He didn’t want to work in a big system, so it seemed like a good time to look around, he said.

He listed his availability in medical publications and he was contacted by a recruitment company seeking a neurosurgeon for Great Plains Health. He was certainly interested. He saw it as an opportunity to bring neurosurgery to a place that had never had it before.

“It seemed like a noble thing to do,” he said.

Warren and his wife Lisa are builders. Along with their new home, they’re almost ready to move into renovated offices and rooms at Great Plains Health’s Brain and Spine Clinic, designed by Lisa. The clinic is now in the Health Pavilion, but will be moving to the old 1975 hospital building, which is immediately east of the 2015-built hospital tower. The interior has been completely remodeled.

Lisa is an integral part not only of his life, but also of his profession, he said.

A lot of people know Warren because he’s not just a surgeon, he’s an author.

Warren has two published autobiographical books, which can be found at A to Z Books in North Platte. His third book is about to be published.

The books are award-winning and praised by best-selling writers who cover similar topics of how to keep your sanity and how to grow spiritually in the face of life’s most pressing challenges.

Max Lucado, who has written nearly 100 books with 130 million copies in print, wrote that “we can greatly benefit from his (Warren’s) wisdom”.

Spiritual writer Philip Yancey said that Warren “has a rarefied point of view, as he makes his living by penetrating into the most secluded – and sacred – part of a person – the human brain”.

Iraq

Warren’s first book, No place to hidetalks about his time in Iraq, where he treated wounded in a combat hospital made out of tents.

Warren takes the reader with him as he treats friends and foes alike, writing about the wounds he healed, the techniques he used, and his struggle to serve in the faith as the mortars exploded and vital supplies could not be counted. He wondered how God could allow war and why American surgeons should treat wounded terrorists, which everyone else did, along with coalition soldiers.

Regarding this last question, he was told that the medical profession in the United States, even in times of war, sustains life. And, he was assured that terrorists were sent to prison when they were well enough.

As for the first question, he faced the deadly challenge of accepting that he was not in control, and all he could do was do his best and let God do the rest, which is not an easy thing for us humans to accept.
Within a day, he saw someone die for lack of blood, heard the screams of badly burned men, and his phone call home went to voicemail.

He found himself angry with God, but also found solace in others at a church service in the tents, where he was politely but firmly recruited to be minister of music because he knew how to play the guitar.

His emotions ran the gamut of extremes. He did not control the events around him.

“I felt sculpted, sculpted,” he wrote. “Pieces of who I thought I was and how I thought about my life were being chipped away. I wondered what would be left after The Sculptor was finished.

Warren has the ability to write in detail, and he is also able to step back and look at his experiences. He wrote detailed emails home, capturing the details. His emails were so informative and captivating that they were distributed to tens, then hundreds and thousands of people across the United States, as readers shared them with friends and family.

He also writes about his uplifting experiences in Iraq, including helping a 13-year-old Iraqi girl who suffered from seizures. The family had no place to turn but the United States, and Warren was there.

Her emails led to a regular blog, which turned into her first book. By then, tens of thousands of people knew about Warren. His desire to communicate turned into Dr. Lee Warren’s podcast, which is now heard weekly in over 70 countries.

Back home

After five hair-raising, trying and introspective months in Iraq, Warren returned to the United States, where he continued to practice neurosurgery in calmer environments.

His second book, I saw the end of you, was released around the time it moved to North Platte. It was around this time in his life when conditions were more comfortable but dilemmas persisted. On the one hand, he had his faith in God and in the eternal life of the spirit, and on the other hand, his extensive knowledge of medicine made him fully aware of the limits of the human brain.

Sometimes knowledge can be too much for mere mortals, but we crave it, and our human spirit cries out for ways to make emotional sense of cold, hard facts.

In both books, he openly and emotionally describes the challenges he faces. The book is for people who want to see their faith awakened.

“Would you like to hear the thoughts of a brilliant surgeon?” If you answered yes, you are holding the right book. Enjoy,” Lucado wrote on the back cover.

Not only did Warren and his wife Lisa move to North Platte, but they also brought about 10 people with him – the core of his surgical team and staff.

Warren loves North Platte and plans to make it his permanent home. He feels “blessed to have this opportunity”, he told the Newsletter.

His desire to stay here speaks to the inherent appeal of North Platte, the growth of Great Plains Health, and the resources coming to west-central Nebraska.

This is good news for patients and good news for anyone who wants to share a journey of faith and learn more about this talented, down-to-earth, open and honest neurosurgeon. Much of his life is an open book or two, and continues through three.

For more information, see wleewarrenmd.com.

This report was first published in the January 26 print edition of the Bulletin.


© 2022 The North Platte Bulletin. All rights reserved.

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Ahead of his show in Dallas, Martin Barre talks about his aversion to most music https://micgillette.com/ahead-of-his-show-in-dallas-martin-barre-talks-about-his-aversion-to-most-music/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/ahead-of-his-show-in-dallas-martin-barre-talks-about-his-aversion-to-most-music/ Of the nearly 55 years that Jethro Tull has existed as a rock ‘n’ roll ambassador of English flute-based folk music, 45 of those years have been carried by the muscular guitar drumming of Martin Barre. With a breath of fresh air into his own career and the relationship with the band that made him […]]]>

Of the nearly 55 years that Jethro Tull has existed as a rock ‘n’ roll ambassador of English flute-based folk music, 45 of those years have been carried by the muscular guitar drumming of Martin Barre. With a breath of fresh air into his own career and the relationship with the band that made him famous, the former Jethro Tull guitarist is set to bring his solo band to Arlington Music Hall.

At 8 p.m. on Thursday, January 27, Barre et co. celebrate the 50th anniversary of Tull’s historic album Scuba diving suit featuring a special guest appearance from former Jethro Tull drummer Clive Bunker and a performance of the iconic album in its entirety as well as other Tull favorites and selections from Barre’s recent solo triumphs.

Barre and Jethro Tull parted ways in 2012, when Ian Anderson, the band’s jester-like flautist frontman, decided to reconfigure the band as a solo effort. Over the next decade, Barre focused on songwriting and composing, something he had little opportunity to do in Jethro Tull.

“There was no availability because Ian was so prolific,” Barre said on the phone before a show in snowy Michigan. “Now I have a lot of space to do that. I’m always up for the challenge and very determined to become a better songwriter, arranger and music producer. I always try to improve what I have, as opposed to everyone’s “conclusions.” Everyone draws “conclusions” about music and what’s right and wrong, but I prefer mine for better or worse.

Surprisingly, despite the varied styles he’s covered with and without Jethro Tull, Barre says his own appetite for outside music is rather specific.

“Ninety-nine percent of the music I hear I don’t like,” he says. “I don’t like other guitarists, I don’t like the saxophone. If there’s one music I love, it’s classical music. I’ve always liked that, that’s what I listen to for fun.

Barre has said in the past that he avoids listening to other guitarists to preserve his own style of playing.

“I’ve been listening to great players for 50 years, and I admire what they do, but I don’t relate to it,” he says, “I don’t hear a guitarist and I think ‘I wish I could do that’ ‘, because I’m happy with what I can do. I’m not interested. I’m just trying to be a better music writer. In terms of acting, I think I’ve found my niche and I have no intention of leaving soon.

Whether this method of “conservation” is more or less effective than others, Barre says each person should have their own methods.

“I think you’re coming to the same place,” he said. “You can learn guitar by taking lessons or watching YouTube videos or by doing it yourself, but you end up in the same place.”

That being said, the remaining 1% that Barre enjoys is somewhat surprising.

“I love virtuoso bluegrass,” he says. “The banjo and mandolin music is fabulous. Folk music too, Scottish and Irish folk music. A tiny bit of blues. But classical music gives me everything I want. It contains all these genres, you just have to find them.

Since fully committing to his solo work, Barre has released four albums over the past decade and has more material on the way, a creative explosion from someone whose first songwriting credit (the song 1975 title Minstrel in the gallery, a credit shared with Anderson) entered six years into his tenure with the band and whose first credited single track came three years later (“Quatrain” from Tull’s live album To burst).

“I’ve done it more in the last few years because I had the motivation to do it,” Barre says. “I love writing music as a beginner. There’s a lot of room for improvement. If I have any aspirations in my career, it’s to be a better music writer.

Barre says he has no qualms that his new found love for songwriting may be overshadowed by the towering legacy of his life’s work.

“I use one to feed the other,” he says. “If I play Jethro Tull’s music to 5,000 people and I can play four of my own songs, that’s great. I’m happy to do that. I have no pretensions about why I’m here and why my audience is here, but deep down my music will always be more important to me. It will always be there under the surface. Writing a song that everyone knows, or bringing in a band and saying, “We’re playing one of your songs on stage,” would be the best thing that could happen to me. The rest is bread and butter.

As to whether he feels like his recent burst of creativity may lead to artistic burnout, Barre says he’s confident that won’t happen soon.

“I haven’t found it harder yet, but I know a lot of people whose songwriting has deteriorated,” he laughs. “I just hope it doesn’t happen to me for a long time and when it does, I’ll stop writing. It’s very hard to be honest with yourself, and it’s very hard to let go of something you’ve done all your life, but I’m very critical of what I do. I hope it stays that way.”

Barre says the postponement of live performances for the past two years has given her a break and allowed her to recharge creatively.

“I had a great two years at home because I was writing music, playing a lot of guitar, playing the flute, kind of catching up with life,” he says. “It didn’t bother me – financially it was a pig, but mentally it was quite refreshing. It’s a good thing to do at my age, just stop and take stock of everything. I’m fine The band is back, the four of us played in Florida for a few weeks, and now we have the girls and Clive with us, so it’s really great.

“I don’t hear a guitar player and I think ‘I wish I could do that’, because I’m happy with what I can do.” – Martin Barre

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Barre’s current band includes vocalist/guitarist Dan Crisp, bassist Alan Thompson, drummer Darby Todd, and vocalists Alex Hart and Becca Langsford providing vocals and additional instrumental backing.

“I’m just trying to give the audience what they paid to come see and hear,” Barre says. “If someone said to me, ‘I really like the way you do Tull’s stuff, but I’m not sure about your stuff’, I wouldn’t mind the least bit. I have no expectations of the If for 10 people who say there’s one person who says they’d like to know more about me, then that’s a great balance.

Although the past decade has been Barre’s first as a solo performer and writer, it’s not the first time he’s made music outside of Jethro Tull. He played guitar on a number of records over the years, including notable turns on solo albums by Ten Years After keyboardist Chick Churchill in 1973 and King Crimson bassist (and then-future Asian singer) John Wetton in 1980.

“I like working with other people,” Barre says. “Especially people I know nothing about, because it puts you in a very open position where you have to work hard and find something that works for them rather than for yourself. I think musicians who don’t get involved not in a challenge like this miss what music is.

Luckily for Barre, this creative mission and a bit of snow in the Midwest seem to be her only challenges in life at the moment. He greatly appreciates the camaraderie of his new group, and life on the road is something he’s been used to all his life.

“I make my home wherever I am,” he says. “I’ve done this all my life. It’s not particularly ideal, but wherever I lay my head, I call home. It is part of the nomadic way of life. For 50 years, I got used to it. It gets a bit sad, but basically it works for me. I love my things – my guitars, my car, my garden, my collection of steam engines – but other than that, I don’t miss them at all. They mean next to nothing, which is a healthy contrast. Nothing should matter so much from a materialistic point of view, so I can live without them.

Despite her inner peace without material possessions, Barre appreciates the presence of a kettle on the road. “With real milk,” he laughs.

Barre says he’s learned to appreciate the little things in life at this point – the privacy, the company of his family and bandmates, and the ability to stop and smell the roses once in a while. on the road. Every day, he runs for an hour in the city where he is.

“You see things other people don’t see when they’re just sitting in a hotel room; it’s the last thing I want to do,” Barre said. “I want to walk around and see what a place is. Most of the places I’ve been to so I know them, but I’m interested in where I am.

The nature of life on the road taught Barre a lot about life.

“People always say, ‘You’ve traveled everywhere,’ but not really, I just worked in lots of different places,” Barre explains. “We’ve played in India before, but I can’t really say I’ve ‘been’ to India. I’ve only been to the Sheraton in Mumbai, and that’s not India. It’s just America in India So I’m not a real traveler, but I do my best with what I have.

“Either you fight your situation or you accept it and enjoy it. We stop for a nice homemade breakfast if we can find a family restaurant. These are the things that make life easier, and they become more important than they normally would.”

As Barre is called in for what is sure to be a chilling soundcheck, he ends the conversation on a high note.

“I’m just happy with what I have,” he says. “Music keeps me busy. It’s my life, it doesn’t own me, but I certainly own it.

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Simple and effective ways to fuel your fighting spirit https://micgillette.com/simple-and-effective-ways-to-fuel-your-fighting-spirit/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 21:24:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/simple-and-effective-ways-to-fuel-your-fighting-spirit/ Lifestyle expert Jamie Hess says New Year’s resolutions don’t usually stick, at least the stats prove it, but that’s often because they may be unreachable or often talk about something. something negative like I can’t eat that or any more chocolate and that may not be manageable in your life. Jamie says she’s focused on […]]]>

Lifestyle expert Jamie Hess says New Year’s resolutions don’t usually stick, at least the stats prove it, but that’s often because they may be unreachable or often talk about something. something negative like I can’t eat that or any more chocolate and that may not be manageable in your life. Jamie says she’s focused on setting realistic goals and adding little things daily that help you live your best life.

Jamie says making better choices for you never goes out of style and as an ambassador for Del Monte I’m really excited about a program they’re doing that is really helping with those better choices for you available to everyone and that makes you feel good doing it. She says they have a program through the end of February called Choose Good, do good. All you do is purchase $15 worth of participating Del Monte products in one purchase. Then you go to their website at DelMonteChooseGood.com and you can redeem $5 for yourself or you can donate to Growing Great. Jamie says Growing Great is a nonprofit they’ve been supporting since 2019. They make healthy food options accessible to inner-city kids.

Gut health is another term you may have heard that is trending and you may be wondering what does it really mean? Jamie says that’s really important, so including a daily supplement with a probiotic in your daily repertoire is a great place to start. She says Jarrow Formulas is the most customer-favorite brand of probiotics on the market. They have a new line called Probiotic + Gummies. Jamie says they have two strains of probiotics that are scientifically proven to improve your digestion, immunity, and gut health.

Jamie says we’ve seen a lot of people during the time of the pandemic picking up a hobby or maybe learning to play an instrument and there’s actually scientific data that proves that learning an instrument can help improve your mood, your self-esteem, reduce anxiety and boost your Memory. Jamie says Guitar Center is a great place to learn an instrument and take those lessons. they have great teachers who are positive about the music. They make a personalized program for each student, regardless of age.

You can follow Jamie Hess on Instagram @NYCFITFAM

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How the manager of a jazz association spends her Sundays https://micgillette.com/how-the-manager-of-a-jazz-association-spends-her-sundays/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 10:00:22 +0000 https://micgillette.com/how-the-manager-of-a-jazz-association-spends-her-sundays/ Alina Bloomgarden started Music on the Inside, a nonprofit that connects jazz artists with people who are incarcerated (or recently released from prisons and jails) for lessons, concerts and mentorship. His inspiration for founding the program seven years ago was Louis Armstrong, who was arrested as a child and sent to a correctional school, where […]]]>

Alina Bloomgarden started Music on the Inside, a nonprofit that connects jazz artists with people who are incarcerated (or recently released from prisons and jails) for lessons, concerts and mentorship. His inspiration for founding the program seven years ago was Louis Armstrong, who was arrested as a child and sent to a correctional school, where he learned to play the horn.

“It changed his life,” she said. “I thought to myself, what do we do now for young people and adults who go through the criminal justice system?” Ms. Bloomgarden, who was one of the founding producers of Jazz at Lincoln Center, brought in Wynton Marsalis, a former colleague and friend, as an artistic advisor for her initiative.

Since then, teaching artists like Antoinette Montague and Arturo O’Farrill have shared their skills and experiences in New York’s jails and prisons, including Rikers. With the pandemic, Music on the Inside moved online and over 200 artists signed up to volunteer. One Sunday a month, a Zoom concert brings together students and professionals; the next show, Musicians for Justice, will take place on January 16.

Ms. Bloomgarden, 77, lives on the Upper West Side.

CAFFEINE FREE When I wake up on Sunday morning, maybe around 8:30, the first thing I do is eat half an apple and some nuts. I stopped drinking coffee because I once went to the Dalai Lama’s doctor and he told me not to. The first year I quit was tough. I would go to Lincoln Center and get a cup, and this cup that I really needed. Now it’s apples and nuts.

ON GUARD Sunday mornings are all about catching up on everything I have to do, everything you normally think of when you think of nonprofit work: fundraising, writing grants. If there is a concert that evening, we will have a sound check at 1 p.m. Richard Miller, one of our excellent guitar teachers, takes care of this, but I’m on call for anything that needs to be done, so I don’t leave the apartment. The Jazz Foundation of America has been extremely important in helping us identify teacher artists like Richard. Every time he had a gig before Covid, he would get up and tell people he needed guitars for our program, and people would donate them. We also received donations of keyboards. They go directly to the correctional facilities or to the people we work with.

PARK POD In the afternoon, I take a walk in Riverside Park with my friend Roni Alpert and her dog, Flo. Flo is very attached to me. Roni and I met at Riverside Park. David Ostwald’s band played there, at the Warsaw Memorial, every day when the weather was nice during the Covid. We became a band with a few other friends. Maybe I’ll see a friend from the synagogue. I am a renewed Jew. I spent 30 years studying Buddhism, then came back to Judaism, at Romemu, a progressive organization on the Upper West Side. We could talk about what we learn with the rabbi, David Ingber.

DANCE CARD: COMPLETE Another thing I might do is try to find a dance to go to. I have always been a dancer; I was a dance student at university. Right now I’m in the ballroom and the swing. Swing 46 sometimes has a dance, or Tavern on the Green. A lot of people ask me to dance. If you’ve been in the dance business for a while, people really like to dance with you. Barry Harris, who has just died, is really the one who inspired me in jazz. I first met him through my friend Travis Peace, who used to go to Barry Harris’ Jazz Cultural Theater to study sax with him. There was something about that environment that was truly transformative.

DINNER CLUB OR SPAGHETTI If we have a concert, it’s from 6 to 7 p.m. I’ll be home for the Zoom. After that, I could go to Dizzy’s Club for dinner and more jazz. I will relax there. Otherwise, I will cook at home. Before Covid, I never ate things like pasta. For some reason I got into cooking pasta during Covid. Sometimes I will try a different recipe. One thing I tried to make recently was chicken tetrazzini. It wasn’t as good as I remembered when I first got it in college.

TIME BUT GRATEFUL I go to bed at 11 or 12 o’clock. One of the last things I do is snack on these peanut butter pretzels from Trader Joe’s. Then I wake up a lot at night because I’m going to look for ideas for the program. I am so moved by the commitment of the musicians, how they want to continue their music and help these populations. So many of our best musicians – Catherine Russell, Don Braden – have brought their music and their hearts and want to do more.

Sunday Routine readers can find out more about Alina Bloomgarden’s work on Instagram @musicontheinsideinc or on Twitter at @MOTIinc.

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Rocker Brush Shiels (76) fails to break the sprint record on the first attempt but finishes the 100m in 18 seconds https://micgillette.com/rocker-brush-shiels-76-fails-to-break-the-sprint-record-on-the-first-attempt-but-finishes-the-100m-in-18-seconds/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 11:32:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/rocker-brush-shiels-76-fails-to-break-the-sprint-record-on-the-first-attempt-but-finishes-the-100m-in-18-seconds/ He didn’t quite break the world record on his first attempt, but for a 76-year-old rock legend with a double hip replacement and cardio defibrillator, a 100m sprint in 18 seconds isn’t not so bad. Guitarist and vocalist Brush Shiels is determined to improve that time in the coming weeks and believes he can meet […]]]>

He didn’t quite break the world record on his first attempt, but for a 76-year-old rock legend with a double hip replacement and cardio defibrillator, a 100m sprint in 18 seconds isn’t not so bad.

Guitarist and vocalist Brush Shiels is determined to improve that time in the coming weeks and believes he can meet the challenge of the 13-second sprint for the over-75s.

He also plans to post videos of his stretching exercises to help other seniors and seniors with hip replacements keep their bodies flexible.

The man who taught Thin Lizzy frontman Phil Lynott and Eurovision winner Johnny Logan to play guitar, missed the 100m challenge record by over 70 by one second five years ago .

After a double hip replacement last summer, he walked with sticks in a YouTube video on BeeGees’ tune smash ‘Staying Alive’ just a week after the operation.

And on New Years Day, under the watchful eye of his old friend and GAA manager Sean Boylan, he took to the track in Meath’s Dunboyne AC and “went like the tap dance.”

“I had both hips done at the same time and after three weeks of recovery I could do everything except dance Argentine tango,” he said.

“I think it was the first time they had done a double hip operation at Bon Secours but I wasn’t back in the hall until I started a song.

“I was only one second away from US holder Bobby Whilden’s 12.77 seconds in 2015, so now I’m aiming to be the first person over 75 with a double hip prosthesis and pacemaker to sprint on. 100 m in 13 seconds.

“I never run for more than a minute a day every two or three days. It’s all I do per minute, but I find that the stretching keeps my body relaxed.”

He said he used different stretching techniques, including the “Alexander Method” used by stage actors to relax.

“ChiGong and the Feldenkrais Method to keep me nimble.

“I went like tap dancing on New Years Day and despite a blustery crosswind I was very happy with my time.

“I would never be up to the challenge without Sean Boylan. He’s my watch and my whistle and my best friend and a few other runners have come to support me,” he said.

The rocker said every week he gets slightly better.

“After hip surgery, your stride is shorter, so your feet have to move faster. But I feel exceptionally good. I feel like I’m going to do it – there’s a very good chance I will. crack this thing (record).

“When I tried to break the record five years ago and finished the 100m in 14 seconds, you have to remember I was wearing my hat and my coat that day, so yeah, I hope to get there.

“It’s unheard of for someone my age with a double hip prosthesis and an ICD (Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator) to sprint. You could do a five or ten kilometer run or walk, but you wouldn’t. not by truck.

“A lot of people are now interested in how I keep my body supple and loose and I plan to post some simple stretching exercises on YouTube for the elderly and those who have had hip replacements. .

“I’ll be back for a run in a few weeks but I’ll know for myself when I can’t go faster and then find something else to do,” he said.

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