long time – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 19:40:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://micgillette.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-2021-08-02T161817.082-150x150.png long time – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ 32 32 Grammy Award-winning Brooke Ligertwood is the latest to collaborate with Martin Guitar on a custom guitar https://micgillette.com/grammy-award-winning-brooke-ligertwood-is-the-latest-to-collaborate-with-martin-guitar-on-a-custom-guitar/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 21:50:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/grammy-award-winning-brooke-ligertwood-is-the-latest-to-collaborate-with-martin-guitar-on-a-custom-guitar/ Martin guitar added another artist to its exclusive club of collaborators. CF Martin & Co., the Nazareth-based guitar makers, have welcomed the contemporary Christian singer-songwriter from New Zealand Brooke Ligertwood to its signature series guitar family after Ligertwood worked with the company on a custom acoustic guitar. Ligertwood is the 13th woman to own her […]]]>

Martin guitar added another artist to its exclusive club of collaborators.

CF Martin & Co., the Nazareth-based guitar makers, have welcomed the contemporary Christian singer-songwriter from New Zealand Brooke Ligertwood to its signature series guitar family after Ligertwood worked with the company on a custom acoustic guitar. Ligertwood is the 13th woman to own her own Martin guitar.

The partnership was originally announced last month.

In an Instagram post from Ligertwood and the guitar company, she said she was first approached in 2019 and the design process started from there.

According to a release from Martin, the new signature guitar model combines facets of two of Martin’s other custom guitars from two pretty notable guitarists – Paul Simon and Eric Clapton. Still, there are plenty of unique touches, like a crown pattern inlay on the guitar’s headstock and Ligertwood’s signature emblazoned 20th fret, according to the release.

Ligertwood noted on Instagram that she’s been playing Martin guitars for 20 years, so it’s clear the collaboration was a long time coming.

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Connor Lagore can be reached at clagore@njadvancemedia.com.

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Moxai, young group from North Devon, want to do a gig https://micgillette.com/moxai-young-group-from-north-devon-want-to-do-a-gig/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/moxai-young-group-from-north-devon-want-to-do-a-gig/ Published: 00:00 7 March 2022 North Devon music news with Andy McAuley: Here’s another rising band I had the pleasure of meeting and getting the scoop on their new single ‘Feeling’ worth checking out… Hello Moxai, I hope you are doing well. If you want to introduce yourself and what you play in the band […]]]>

Published:
00:00 7 March 2022



North Devon music news with Andy McAuley:

Here’s another rising band I had the pleasure of meeting and getting the scoop on their new single ‘Feeling’ worth checking out…

Hello Moxai, I hope you are doing well. If you want to introduce yourself and what you play in the band

LG: Hi, my name is Lily Graver and I play drums.

LHP: Hi, I’m Lily Hanlon-Penny and I play bass.

C: Hello, I’m Cerys Hemmings and I sing and write the songs.

N: Hi, I’m Noah Houghton and I play guitar in the band but I play bass as a daily job.

Where and how did you all come together?

LG: I studied music at A level before starting the course where I met Cerys and Lily – and Ben! Cerys messaged me afterwards and we chatted. I tagged Cerys in a TikTok from a function band playing at a wedding, Lily saw this tag and we decided to start a band.

LHP: The TikTok video showed the feature band playing “Life Is A Highway” and we thought it was hilarious and thought it would be great to start a band after seeing how much fun it was.

C: Yes, we struggled for so long to find a guitarist but luckily we found Noah who was very close because he and I are together!

What are your musical or non-musical inspirations?

LHP: I feel like one of my biggest inspirations is Nothing but Thieves, me and Cerys were lucky enough to see them live.

LG: The punk genre inspires me a lot, especially the Riot Grrrl subgenre. I’m inspired by bands such as The Wood Burning Savages, Touts and Cherym. My music teachers and tutors encouraged and inspired me to look into music. I only started playing the drums three years ago!

C: I did my first solo in the choir when I was three and it really took off from there. I dabbled in musical theater and opera for a decade, then got into heavy alternative indie music, which helped me move away from my musical theater tone – but I’ll be forever grateful to my experience as a performer and my classical training. I like to take inspiration from soul singers like Ella Fitzgerald.

N: I’ve been playing bass for nine years, the Red Hot Chili Peppers were a huge thing for me when I started on bass so it’s only natural that I take inspiration from them now that I play guitar. There’s something about John Frusciante’s game that speaks to me. A lot of my inspiration comes from jazz, funk and soul, I just wish I could play guitar properly!

You just released your first single ‘Fleeing’, how was it and where did you record it?

C: “Fleeing” is a very special song for us. We thought it would create a community for those who have struggled with creepy individuals following them or those who have felt uncomfortable around people.

LG: As we are a relatively new band, we decided to do everything ourselves. Guitar, bass and vocals were recorded in Noah’s bedroom. He sent me the project to which I added drums and mixed and mastered. Distrokid helped me distribute “Fleeing” on Spotify, Apple Music, Soundcloud and YouTube. Fortunately, the timing worked out and we were able to release it on February 3. We’re going to release an EP this year, which will be a full studio recording.

What are your passions or hobbies outside of music?

LG: I’m a long-time supporter of Derby County Football Club – you’ll no doubt see me wearing a football top behind the drums! Otherwise, my interests are strongly rooted in music, whether it’s playing drums, bass or guitar, performing live, recording sessions, producing, journalism or break down !

LHP: I do a lot of different art styles and will help create eventual album covers, merchandise and anything art-based for the band.

C: I am an avid crystal collector, I have over 200 different types of crystals in all colors, shapes and sizes and I love all things spiritual.


Moxai at the Palladium Club
– Credit: Stuart McConnell

I saw that you had a few gigs under your belt, how did it go and what was the funniest or weirdest moment for the band?

LG: At our first gig, I rocked too hard and cut my finger. I had such an adrenaline rush that I didn’t even notice until afterwards. Things went well. Just hitting things up and hoping for the best.

LHP: I think at most I yell at others saying I don’t know what I’m doing!

C: Yeah, I remember bursting out laughing because Lily said she didn’t know what she was doing and Stuart from The Palladium took a picture of that moment on our Instagram.

What do you think of the music industry as a young band?

LG: Competition for bands doing it themselves has increased due to the rise of TikTok and other social media platforms; we use the DIY punk approach to our advantage. Our ages range from 16-19, so we know what appeals to people our age and post engaging content on our Instagram, TikTok and Facebook @MoxaiBand

LHP: I feel like since Covid there has been an increase in younger groups and we need to find ways to stand out from the rest

When and where will you play next?

LHP: We haven’t booked any concerts yet, but we hope to participate as soon as possible!

LG: We are now concentrating on writing new songs for our EP. Remember the name – it’s pronounced mok see

Keep rocking, rockers!

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The Scottish Curling soundtrack, delivered by pipers from Beijing https://micgillette.com/the-scottish-curling-soundtrack-delivered-by-pipers-from-beijing/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 08:37:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/the-scottish-curling-soundtrack-delivered-by-pipers-from-beijing/ BEIJING — The curling arena went dark and strobe lights cleared the ice. A band of pipers marched by almost like a vision from another time, or at the very least, another continent. The musicians describe themselves as amateurs, mainly from Beijing. None of them have ever been to Scotland. But they were dressed as […]]]>

BEIJING — The curling arena went dark and strobe lights cleared the ice. A band of pipers marched by almost like a vision from another time, or at the very least, another continent.

The musicians describe themselves as amateurs, mainly from Beijing. None of them have ever been to Scotland. But they were dressed as if they had just arrived from the Highlands: red-checked kilts decorated with small pockets with long tufts of horsehair called sporrans, part of the uniform they had ordered abroad.

The constant shout of ‘Scotland the Brave’ withstood the din of the arena – the selection is undoubtedly a nod to curling’s Scottish roots. But the anthem is also a sort of default melody for the instrument; instructional videos on how to play were easy to find online. And the group needed this help since their teacher, the only one they could find in China, had recently left the country.

“We just love the bagpipes,” piper leader Zhang A Li said after one of their pre-game performances – a staple of curling tournaments, whether in China or Chicago. , “and we all came together.”

That, in itself, is something of a miracle.

In a way, the formation of the group reflects the sprawling challenge faced by Chinese officials in staging the Winter Olympics in a country unfamiliar with the events that would unfold. A large air track was built in a former industrial park, a bobsled course was carved into a mountain and, of course, plenty of artificial snow was needed for an area that receives very little precipitation in winter.

And curling competitions require pipers.

The sport and the instrument are linked by a common history, which dates back centuries to the frozen lochs of Scotland. Yet even beyond these cultural connections, curling and bagpipes also seem to be similar pursuits. For the uninitiated, the sport with stones and brooms and the instrument with a bladder and a tangle of reeds can seem heavy and confusing. In expert hands, however, these parts coalesce into something absorbing, even graceful, and undoubtedly one of a kind.

“Why do you choose curling over baseball? Well, there’s something you can’t quite explain,” said Scott McLean, who plays curling and bagpipes for the Granite Curling Club in Seattle and, as a history teacher, has explored the intersecting roots of the two hobbies. “Why do you choose the bagpipes instead of the violin? It’s kind of a weird thing.

Pipers in Beijing said they were drawn to a sound they found fascinating. “Loud and clear and penetrating”, as Zhang said.

But it turns out that bagpipes is an activity that has yet to find a taker in China, which means it’s not easy to become one of those skilled hands. “I only know about a dozen people in China who can play this instrument,” said Chao Luomong, another bagpipe player.

The curiosity and thirst for challenge that attracted this group is familiar among pipers. Learning the instrument is like solving a puzzle. Playing it offers a unique form of expression.

“It’s the rhythm of a babbling brook, it’s the rhythm of a season, it’s the rhythm of a doe bouncing in the glen,” McLean said. “It brings me to a place where I can emotionally experience, not just play the notes. I think there’s an appeal to all kinds of people.

The band – with four pipers joined by two drummers, coming from a variety of backgrounds including elementary school teachers and a freelance set designer – have been playing together for a few years, just as curling competitions were beginning to heat up across the China before the Games. .

In the months leading up to the start of the Olympics, the band would get together after work to try and perfect a few different songs. Pipers have experience with a range of other instruments, including trumpet, clarinet, guitar, saxophone and organ. “We are all versatile,” said Zhang, 36.

But this range has certainly been tested by the bagpipes. Zhang is one of the most experienced bagpipe players, having first learned to play in 2014. None of his colleagues were terribly advanced, so their lessons started with the basics.

“I think the hardest part of learning bagpipes is mostly not knowing enough about the instrument,” Chao said. “Like, when a bagpipe is broken, how do you fix it?”

Apart from the technical difficulty, the Chinese bagpipe players were also surprised by the physical difficulty it could represent. Bagpipes, Zhang said, “require a strong lung.” He described the force it takes to get the sound right – “controlling the air pressure in the bag, to be stable and unchanging”.

“It takes a long time,” he added, “to repeat every bit over and over again.”

The group designed the stitched logo on their uniforms, which includes the letters Y and S, representing the Chinese word for warrior – another tribute to Scottish history.

Yet, they conceded, they did not choose the instrument out of interest in the traditions of a distant place. Curling, by the way, doesn’t matter much to them either. At least one piper tried to loop once and said it didn’t fit. They watched some games on their phones, which they store in their sporrans. “Honestly, I don’t know much about rules,” Chao, 37, said. “What we like the most is bagpipes.”

And yet the group has been emblematic of a transformative time for curling, as the sport balances the traditions embedded in its DNA with a surge in global popularity in the years since it became an event. official Olympic Games in Nagano in 1998. (In Mexico, some clubs have replaced bagpipes with mariachis.)

Chinese pipers gained a worldwide following at the start of the Beijing Games and in doing so received some attention from the Scottish news media. In an article, The Daily Record, a Glasgow tabloid, wrote that the band had “revealed that they loved all our traditions – apart from going commando under a kilt”, saying that it was custom for men not to wear underwear when wearing the garment.

In the article, Zhang replied, “We try to be as close to the traditions as possible, but it’s cold – we have our underwear for sure.”

Otherwise, the response has been much warmer. “I’m very happy to have them here,” Bruce Mouat, from Edinburgh who represented Great Britain in the mixed doubles competition, told reporters after a match. He added that the music reminded him of his home.

On the first night of the men’s competition on Wednesday, Team USA’s Chris Plys noticed them as well. “It’s been a long time since I heard ‘Scotland the Brave’ come out,” he said. “I was not expecting that at all.”

In truth, as remarkable as they may seem, the pipers have yet to have their breakout moment.

Curling has one of the most demanding schedules of any sport at the Winter Games, with competitions running from February 2-20 and with up to three rounds of matches per day. Pipers play before each round, and each performance follows the same routine, becoming a sort of Groundhog Day experience.

On Wednesday evening, as the curlers crowded into a final practice run, an announcer, joined by the plump panda who serves as the Olympic mascot, tried to shake up the modest assembly of spectators scattered in the stands.

As the band came out and started playing, the announcer faced the sound of bagpipes and continued to talk, introducing the curlers from various countries. There was some applause just as the band finished their snippet of “Scotland the Brave”. But the applause, it turned out, was for the Danish men’s team as its members waved to the crowd.

Pipers stood stoically along the edge of the ice, knowing they would be back in less than 12 hours, donning the same uniforms and playing the same song.

Liu Yi contributed report.

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home music production https://micgillette.com/home-music-production/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 01:25:45 +0000 https://micgillette.com/home-music-production/ Thinking of creating your own music? Want to take back that old guitar you’ve been ignoring all these years? Want to experiment with producing your own music? The pandemic has given us plenty of time to try new things and resume pending hobbies. Digital music production has opened many doors for musicians, from instrument versatility […]]]>

Thinking of creating your own music? Want to take back that old guitar you’ve been ignoring all these years? Want to experiment with producing your own music? The pandemic has given us plenty of time to try new things and resume pending hobbies. Digital music production has opened many doors for musicians, from instrument versatility to distorting sounds with effects. Much of today’s music is recorded digitally on a computer, and if you want to try your hand at music, here are some of the tools you’ll need to fill your empty desk and start experimenting with some tunes.

A decent computer

As with any digital production, a good computer is at the heart of this setup. Although audio production is not as demanding as video production or 3D modeling, it still requires a good processor and plenty of RAM. Mixing usually involves working with multiple audio clips loaded onto RAM, and the larger the project, the more RAM you will need. So, invest in a relatively fast computer with plenty of RAM and storage space. MacBook M1s are excellent choices for music production, and also the only option if you want to use Logic Pro. If you’re not married to Apple-exclusive software, the Dell XPS 13 is also a great choice, given the portability and power. While these are good options, you’re not limited to them, and any desktop or laptop computer would work well if it’s relatively modern with plenty of RAM and storage.

Musical instruments

To be a good musician, I believe that everyone must start by learning to play an instrument. Learning any musical instrument will introduce beginners to basic musical notations, composition techniques and musical progressions which will all be vital knowledge when working with digital instruments and sounds. If you want to sing or rap, there are some great mics you might want to consider for your setup. the Audio Technica AT2020 is a very good condenser mic which costs around Rs 15,000. But since the AT2020 is a condenser mic, it will be much more susceptible to background noise, which means you will only be able to use this mic properly if you are in a quiet room. For about the same price, the Shure SM-57 is another option if you don’t have a quiet environment to record. The SM-57 is a dynamic mic and will therefore handle unwanted background noise better. For other instruments, going to music stores in person and getting a feel for the instrument, and considering your budget can be a good idea.

Digital Audio Workstation (DAW)

A digital audio workstation is your central audio software where you do all of your mixing and mastering. If you play instruments, this is also where you record your riffs, bass lines or drum beats and mix them together and/or with digital instruments. DAWs are really powerful pieces of software that can also modify audio in countless different ways, and most of them also support third-party digital signal processors (DSPs) allowing musicians to add audio effects. The most popular DAWs would be Ableton Live, Logic Pro, Pro Tools, FL Studio, and Cubase. Logic Pro and FL Studio are some of the easiest programs to understand if you’re a beginner, but can easily handle professional workloads. However, music professionals advocate that Ableton Live and Pro Tools are the best. It depends on your personal preference, but be sure to check out some tutorials for all of these tools if you’re a beginner, because while they do the same thing, there are differences in how they work. You might find a better one to cooperate with your workflow.

audio interface

If you want to plug any of your audio equipment into your computer, you will need an audio interface. An audio interface is essentially a translator between the analog signal from your instrument and the digital signal expected by your computer. The audio interfaces also have professional audio inputs that work with instruments and professional audio gear. Guitars typically use 6.35mm (1⁄4 inch) connectors, which are analog jacks similar to but larger than the 3.5mm audio outputs found in computers or smartphones. These jacks usually cannot be plugged directly into a computer unless you have a 6.35mm to 3.5mm cable or a USB cable. These converter cables however are not the best to use and will create a lot of noise and latency between your instrument and your computer. The best way is to invest in a USB audio interface that supports a 6.35 input and XLR inputs (these are the circular three-pin connectors typically used by professional audio devices like microphones). These audio interfaces can be expensive depending on the model and feature set, but for beginners, the M-Audio M-Track Duo is a bargain at around Rs 9,000. It’s not as large as other audio interfaces and has only two input slots and minimal features, but for the price it’s a budget solution for better synchronization with your computer.

Headphones/Speakers

Making professional music means you also need audio output devices that let you experience all the nuances of your music with high-quality output. Studio monitors are loudspeakers that reproduce music in its most authentic form, without post-processing or bass boost, and for a very long time Yamaha has remained the king of studio monitors. But because Yamaha monitors are so good, they also cost an arm and a leg. the Yamaha HS8 studio monitors cost around 100,000 rupees, which could be quite a steep price for many beginners or home studio setups. For people looking for cheaper but good quality monitors, the M-Audio BX5 D3 is not a bad choice. It won’t have the sonic clarity of the Yamaha but will still work well. If you want a more private experience, there are also good headphones. the Sennheiser HD 280 Pro is an excellent choice at Rs 20,000 with good clarity and musical response. They’re also enclosed, which means you’ll block out most background noise when using them. If you want to go a little cheaper, you can also consider the Audio Technica ATH-M30x. This is a good pair of inexpensive studio headphones at Rs 12,000.

MIDI controller

Since you’ll be creating music on your computer itself, in addition to your instrument, a device that works well and interfaces with your DAW would be a great addition. Your DAW will come with a plethora of sound effects, digital soundbanks, and instruments, and while you can also control them with your keyboard, access to a MIDI keyboard or dashboard will make it easier for you to control of these instruments. Just like playing naturally on a keyboard, drawing musical compositions and having access to drum pads will provide the versatility that the keyboard cannot. Many MIDI keyboards also come with pitch mixing functions, programmable buttons, and even rhythm pads. Just like keyboards, the more large and numerous keys a MIDI keyboard has, the more expensive it becomes. For a beginner, the 25 keys Arturia MiniLab MkII would be a great choice. The keyboard is very basic but comes with two banks of eight controller pads and 16 rotary encoders. If you want to go full size, the Arturia Keylab Essential with 88 keys is a great option. the Akai MPK Mini Mk3 is also a good alternative to the 25-key Arturia MiniLab.

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Ahead of his show in Dallas, Martin Barre talks about his aversion to most music https://micgillette.com/ahead-of-his-show-in-dallas-martin-barre-talks-about-his-aversion-to-most-music/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/ahead-of-his-show-in-dallas-martin-barre-talks-about-his-aversion-to-most-music/ Of the nearly 55 years that Jethro Tull has existed as a rock ‘n’ roll ambassador of English flute-based folk music, 45 of those years have been carried by the muscular guitar drumming of Martin Barre. With a breath of fresh air into his own career and the relationship with the band that made him […]]]>

Of the nearly 55 years that Jethro Tull has existed as a rock ‘n’ roll ambassador of English flute-based folk music, 45 of those years have been carried by the muscular guitar drumming of Martin Barre. With a breath of fresh air into his own career and the relationship with the band that made him famous, the former Jethro Tull guitarist is set to bring his solo band to Arlington Music Hall.

At 8 p.m. on Thursday, January 27, Barre et co. celebrate the 50th anniversary of Tull’s historic album Scuba diving suit featuring a special guest appearance from former Jethro Tull drummer Clive Bunker and a performance of the iconic album in its entirety as well as other Tull favorites and selections from Barre’s recent solo triumphs.

Barre and Jethro Tull parted ways in 2012, when Ian Anderson, the band’s jester-like flautist frontman, decided to reconfigure the band as a solo effort. Over the next decade, Barre focused on songwriting and composing, something he had little opportunity to do in Jethro Tull.

“There was no availability because Ian was so prolific,” Barre said on the phone before a show in snowy Michigan. “Now I have a lot of space to do that. I’m always up for the challenge and very determined to become a better songwriter, arranger and music producer. I always try to improve what I have, as opposed to everyone’s “conclusions.” Everyone draws “conclusions” about music and what’s right and wrong, but I prefer mine for better or worse.

Surprisingly, despite the varied styles he’s covered with and without Jethro Tull, Barre says his own appetite for outside music is rather specific.

“Ninety-nine percent of the music I hear I don’t like,” he says. “I don’t like other guitarists, I don’t like the saxophone. If there’s one music I love, it’s classical music. I’ve always liked that, that’s what I listen to for fun.

Barre has said in the past that he avoids listening to other guitarists to preserve his own style of playing.

“I’ve been listening to great players for 50 years, and I admire what they do, but I don’t relate to it,” he says, “I don’t hear a guitarist and I think ‘I wish I could do that’ ‘, because I’m happy with what I can do. I’m not interested. I’m just trying to be a better music writer. In terms of acting, I think I’ve found my niche and I have no intention of leaving soon.

Whether this method of “conservation” is more or less effective than others, Barre says each person should have their own methods.

“I think you’re coming to the same place,” he said. “You can learn guitar by taking lessons or watching YouTube videos or by doing it yourself, but you end up in the same place.”

That being said, the remaining 1% that Barre enjoys is somewhat surprising.

“I love virtuoso bluegrass,” he says. “The banjo and mandolin music is fabulous. Folk music too, Scottish and Irish folk music. A tiny bit of blues. But classical music gives me everything I want. It contains all these genres, you just have to find them.

Since fully committing to his solo work, Barre has released four albums over the past decade and has more material on the way, a creative explosion from someone whose first songwriting credit (the song 1975 title Minstrel in the gallery, a credit shared with Anderson) entered six years into his tenure with the band and whose first credited single track came three years later (“Quatrain” from Tull’s live album To burst).

“I’ve done it more in the last few years because I had the motivation to do it,” Barre says. “I love writing music as a beginner. There’s a lot of room for improvement. If I have any aspirations in my career, it’s to be a better music writer.

Barre says he has no qualms that his new found love for songwriting may be overshadowed by the towering legacy of his life’s work.

“I use one to feed the other,” he says. “If I play Jethro Tull’s music to 5,000 people and I can play four of my own songs, that’s great. I’m happy to do that. I have no pretensions about why I’m here and why my audience is here, but deep down my music will always be more important to me. It will always be there under the surface. Writing a song that everyone knows, or bringing in a band and saying, “We’re playing one of your songs on stage,” would be the best thing that could happen to me. The rest is bread and butter.

As to whether he feels like his recent burst of creativity may lead to artistic burnout, Barre says he’s confident that won’t happen soon.

“I haven’t found it harder yet, but I know a lot of people whose songwriting has deteriorated,” he laughs. “I just hope it doesn’t happen to me for a long time and when it does, I’ll stop writing. It’s very hard to be honest with yourself, and it’s very hard to let go of something you’ve done all your life, but I’m very critical of what I do. I hope it stays that way.”

Barre says the postponement of live performances for the past two years has given her a break and allowed her to recharge creatively.

“I had a great two years at home because I was writing music, playing a lot of guitar, playing the flute, kind of catching up with life,” he says. “It didn’t bother me – financially it was a pig, but mentally it was quite refreshing. It’s a good thing to do at my age, just stop and take stock of everything. I’m fine The band is back, the four of us played in Florida for a few weeks, and now we have the girls and Clive with us, so it’s really great.

“I don’t hear a guitar player and I think ‘I wish I could do that’, because I’m happy with what I can do.” – Martin Barre

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Barre’s current band includes vocalist/guitarist Dan Crisp, bassist Alan Thompson, drummer Darby Todd, and vocalists Alex Hart and Becca Langsford providing vocals and additional instrumental backing.

“I’m just trying to give the audience what they paid to come see and hear,” Barre says. “If someone said to me, ‘I really like the way you do Tull’s stuff, but I’m not sure about your stuff’, I wouldn’t mind the least bit. I have no expectations of the If for 10 people who say there’s one person who says they’d like to know more about me, then that’s a great balance.

Although the past decade has been Barre’s first as a solo performer and writer, it’s not the first time he’s made music outside of Jethro Tull. He played guitar on a number of records over the years, including notable turns on solo albums by Ten Years After keyboardist Chick Churchill in 1973 and King Crimson bassist (and then-future Asian singer) John Wetton in 1980.

“I like working with other people,” Barre says. “Especially people I know nothing about, because it puts you in a very open position where you have to work hard and find something that works for them rather than for yourself. I think musicians who don’t get involved not in a challenge like this miss what music is.

Luckily for Barre, this creative mission and a bit of snow in the Midwest seem to be her only challenges in life at the moment. He greatly appreciates the camaraderie of his new group, and life on the road is something he’s been used to all his life.

“I make my home wherever I am,” he says. “I’ve done this all my life. It’s not particularly ideal, but wherever I lay my head, I call home. It is part of the nomadic way of life. For 50 years, I got used to it. It gets a bit sad, but basically it works for me. I love my things – my guitars, my car, my garden, my collection of steam engines – but other than that, I don’t miss them at all. They mean next to nothing, which is a healthy contrast. Nothing should matter so much from a materialistic point of view, so I can live without them.

Despite her inner peace without material possessions, Barre appreciates the presence of a kettle on the road. “With real milk,” he laughs.

Barre says he’s learned to appreciate the little things in life at this point – the privacy, the company of his family and bandmates, and the ability to stop and smell the roses once in a while. on the road. Every day, he runs for an hour in the city where he is.

“You see things other people don’t see when they’re just sitting in a hotel room; it’s the last thing I want to do,” Barre said. “I want to walk around and see what a place is. Most of the places I’ve been to so I know them, but I’m interested in where I am.

The nature of life on the road taught Barre a lot about life.

“People always say, ‘You’ve traveled everywhere,’ but not really, I just worked in lots of different places,” Barre explains. “We’ve played in India before, but I can’t really say I’ve ‘been’ to India. I’ve only been to the Sheraton in Mumbai, and that’s not India. It’s just America in India So I’m not a real traveler, but I do my best with what I have.

“Either you fight your situation or you accept it and enjoy it. We stop for a nice homemade breakfast if we can find a family restaurant. These are the things that make life easier, and they become more important than they normally would.”

As Barre is called in for what is sure to be a chilling soundcheck, he ends the conversation on a high note.

“I’m just happy with what I have,” he says. “Music keeps me busy. It’s my life, it doesn’t own me, but I certainly own it.

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Meet Cait Devin: The Guitar Community’s Most Charitable New Player | Guitar.com https://micgillette.com/meet-cait-devin-the-guitar-communitys-most-charitable-new-player-guitar-com/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 09:30:25 +0000 https://micgillette.com/meet-cait-devin-the-guitar-communitys-most-charitable-new-player-guitar-com/ At just 20 years old, Cait Devin is already climbing the industry ladder. Although she is a passionate singer-songwriter in her own right, the shredded collaborations she hosts through YouTube have not just been fundraisers for charity, but impressive mini-concerts where she has performed. been joined by some of social media’s most notable players and […]]]>


At just 20 years old, Cait Devin is already climbing the industry ladder. Although she is a passionate singer-songwriter in her own right, the shredded collaborations she hosts through YouTube have not just been fundraisers for charity, but impressive mini-concerts where she has performed. been joined by some of social media’s most notable players and musicians, from Michael Angelo Batio to Lexi Rose, and more.

We tell her about the use of music to relieve health problems, her latest Shred collaboration, Jams For Benefits, and her recent single, jokes about you.

How long have you been playing guitar?

“I bought my first acoustic guitar when I was 14 and started playing acoustic concerts regularly when I was 15. When I was around 17, I started playing solo guitar and formed a hard rock band, and that’s where I got a lot of experience. After that, I decided to contact my favorite players, hoping to work with them. But lead has always been my second voice.

Since then you have organized numerous charity shred collaborations. Why haven’t you pursued a more linear solo career?

“Experiencing an illness like trigeminal neuralgia has really opened my eyes to what other health issues can really be struggling with. So, it really inspired me to do some charity work so that my projects can also benefit those in need. I have a main solo career alongside my guitar work – I’ve been a singer-songwriter since the very beginning of my career. I would consider the shred collaborations and things as a side project, but a very, very worthy project that I’m proud of.

What can you tell us about your future collaborations and projects?

“I’ve organized three mega shredding collaborations and a few more, including Vinnie Moore and Andy James. This next event will be called Jams for Benefits and it will be a multi-week concert series. I’ve partnered up with a new artist streaming platform called The Avenue, artists like Rikki Lee and Sarah Longfield have already made their own streams there. It’s a great place to build an audience.

“The event will open with a series of independent and underground artists and headliners, including Bill Hudson of the Trans-Siberian Orchestra, Michael Angelo Batio, Lexi Rose and many more. Each feed will have a tip jar attached and the proceeds will go to the Facial Pain Association – a link will be shareable for viewers to tune in – and they essentially provide resources for patients like me with trigeminal neuralgia. If you don’t know what it is, it is a severe chronic nerve pain that affects the trigeminal nerve that carries sensation from the face to the brain. More details and the full lineup will be announced later in October. “

What do you learn by collaborating with confirmed guitarists? Have you ever felt the pressure of being a rising and rising woman?

“Honestly, I don’t feel any pressure. I’m just happy to be here! I take tabs for a few solos from different people, and just go over exactly what they’re playing, so I’m definitely picking up a few guitar hits again. The more melodies in my brain, the better!

Who influences your sound as a guitarist?

“I have explored many genres. My recent single, jokes about you, has a very alternative pop touch with elements of hip hop and rock, I think that’s where I’m headed. I feel like I’ve found a sound in which I can express myself freely and be the most authentic. I was in the rock business for a long time – and I still consider myself given that I host all of these genre-based projects – but I’m open to artists of all kinds and try to think outside the box. I love songwriters like Ed Sheeran and Taylor Swift, but I’m also a huge fan of Doja Cat, The Weeknd, and Grimes. When it comes to my game, I have so many people that I admire who have influenced me, some that I can now call my friends including Sophie Burrell, Nita Strauss, Angel Vivaldi and many more!

Do you see future projects following a similar theme or going in a different direction?

“Alternative pop is definitely where my heart is – often accompanied by a few guitar riffs. I’m a lover of all styles and because of who I am as an artist I try my best not to label. But I’m really happy with where I am.

What are your goals as a guitarist and composer?

“I want to continue to fundraise for good causes – making music just for myself alone is sort of in vain. It is one of my goals for the future to eventually be signed and join a great team. And that doesn’t mean I can’t be a freelance artist forever – it’s definitely more than doable and fun – but being part of that “family” vibe would be cool. Of course, I have to tackle my illness a little more, but I am confident that I will get better and come back to life!

Cait Devin’s new single, jokes about you, is now available. Visit caitdevin.com for more information on its Jams For Benefits.


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Buchholz student organization mobilizes to raise awareness about mental health and suicide prevention https://micgillette.com/buchholz-student-organization-mobilizes-to-raise-awareness-about-mental-health-and-suicide-prevention/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 18:45:41 +0000 https://micgillette.com/buchholz-student-organization-mobilizes-to-raise-awareness-about-mental-health-and-suicide-prevention/ Editor’s Note: Please note that this story includes mention of suicide and its impact on a community. If you or someone you know is suicidal, you can reach the National Suicide Hotline at 800-273-8255. Ryan Howell was an artist. He learned to strum any tune on his guitar, no matter the genre, and he shared […]]]>


Editor’s Note: Please note that this story includes mention of suicide and its impact on a community. If you or someone you know is suicidal, you can reach the National Suicide Hotline at 800-273-8255.

Ryan Howell was an artist.

He learned to strum any tune on his guitar, no matter the genre, and he shared his music on his “Shred of the Day” Facebook page. His drawings were featured in an exhibition at the Thomas Center in Gainesville, and he was voted “most artistic senior” by his peers at Gainesville High School. He twice enrolled at Santa Fe College to take additional art classes to develop his gifts.

He was a free spirit. With the spinning wheels of his long board beneath him, Howell’s long brown hair whipped and whirled in the wind. He wore bright colors and tropical prints.

Ryan Howell loved art, music and photography. (Photo courtesy of Teresa Howell)

At his memorial service, his family asked guests to do the same: wear a tropical shirt and khaki shorts.

Howell committed suicide in 2017 at the age of 22.

Although her death was a tragedy for her parents and two sisters, they used their moment of darkness to inspire a change in the conversation about mental health. They started on Ryan Howell Memorial Scholarship, who donates directly to Prospects Integrated treatment and sober living, an Ocala-based addiction recovery treatment program. Four years later, the scholarship is still supporting the program, allowing the facility to expand its services and locations.

Inspired by the scholarship, Gainesville students showed their support for raising mental health awareness in memory of Howell.

Howell’s sister, Ellyn, now 20, and her friends who are members of the Distributive Education Clubs of America, or THIS SIDE, at the Entrepreneurship Academy at Buchholz High School decided to remember Howell in a way that reflects the light he brought to the world through a race of colors.

In 2018, she planned the first March4Minds 5K color run to support the Howell Stock Exchange. The event not only supports the community living facility where Ryan found a support system, but it also facilitates a conversation about mental health resources and suicide prevention.

Breaking the silence on mental health

Ryan’s mother Teresa Howell said her son struggled with schizophrenia and drug addiction for almost two years. She hopes that increased awareness will prompt others to seek help sooner.

“This is our real message: the sooner they get help and treatment, the better,” she said. “The first intervention we can possibly make is the one we are focusing our efforts on. “

After the inaugural 5K event, she received Facebook messages from families facing similar challenges and letters from Perspectives clients who said the help they received through the scholarship saved their lives.

“Maybe someone in such a sad and tragic situation is going to be helped by this project,” Howell said.

When Ryan was diagnosed with schizophrenia at age 21 while battling drug addiction, he was considered “doubly diagnosed.” Her family traveled across the country in 2016 seeking treatment in Texas, Georgia and Tennessee. The options for someone with a dual diagnosis were slim and expensive.

Later that year they found help in Gainesville; Perspectives Integrated Treatment and Sober Living was willing to serve a Ryan as one of their first dual diagnosis clients.

Steve Blank, director of operations at Perspectives, said mental health issues and addiction are often linked. While Perspectives focuses on addiction recovery, psychiatrists and licensed mental health professionals are on staff to help with mental health issues underlying or resulting from addiction.

Blank said Ryan had moved into a sober living house, an independent community where individuals typically stay for six months and are guided by recovery coaches. Clients of the hostels can enter the workforce and continue to stay in Perspectives homes.

Blank said scholarship contributions would be used to sponsor people and achieve Prospects’ goal of never turning someone down due to lack of funding. In addition, the money can sponsor recreational activities or weekend trips.

Perspectives continues to expand its services, including a new ambulatory care facility it plans to open in Gainesville. While treating people with a dual diagnosis is not the program’s specialty, Blank is keen to provide treatment resources to as many people as possible.

“Staying positive is difficult because not everything we hear is always upbeat and pink clouds and unicorns,” he said. “So it’s important to give hope, and it’s also very important to remember that for some of us these people may have been us at one point or a family member.”

Running to recover. And the obstacles of 2020.

With the COVID-19 pandemic onset in 2020, the race for colors was not a sure possibility, and Howell said she believed it could mean the next class of CAED students would choose a different cause. to support. But Ellie Jones, Dillon Menefee and Sophia Butler decided to plan another chance for community members to cross the finish line.

On November 13 at Trinity Methodist Church, DECA hosted the third Mars4Minds 5K color race.

Between the GoFundMe page and race registration fee of $ 20, this year’s color race raised nearly $ 12,000. As was the case in 2019, the Perspectives program matched donations, which allowed students to raise over $ 18,000, almost $ 15,000 more than the first race in 2018.

The Howell family attends the third March4Minds color race. “It is very heartwarming to see all of the young people and their hard work,” said Teresa Howell. (Photo courtesy of Teresa Howell)

Jones, 17, said she has known the Howell family since she was young. She remembers seeing them at mass on Christmas Eve in the Church of the Trinity, grouped together on a bench. After Ryan died, her family brought meals to the Howells front door and she competed in the March4Minds 2018 race.

Now a senior at Buchholz and vice president of hospitality at DECA, Jones has partnered with Menefee and Butler to carry on the tradition – and make it bigger than ever. Nearly 100 runners and 20 volunteers gathered on the morning of November 13th after nearly four months of planning and working with sponsors.

“None of this has ever been a burden,” Jones said. “We were all very passionate about this, and one of our goals was to get more attendees than they ever had just because we know how much it means for the whole family.”

She added that the passion of young students makes her believe that Buchholz DECA will continue to support the scholarship after graduating this spring, and she hopes to see her peers raise positive conversations about mental health.

“I think people want to help, they just don’t know exactly how,” she said. “This event and all the outreach, I think it was a really good way for people to learn how you can get involved in a small way, and it can mean a lot.”

Butler, president of Buchholz DECA, said the event helped her see how the community – and her as an individual – can make a difference, even if it starts out small. The 17-year-old said a conversation with Howell and her fellow DECA executive members after the race was her favorite time to plan the event. Howell told the three students it was one of the best days it had been in a long time.

A drawing by Ryan Howell shows a scenic roadside view. (Photo courtesy of Teresa Howell)

Advancing the Conversation on Adolescents and Mental Health.

Like Jones, Butler believes serious conversations about mental health should start early.

“I think young adults and teens are certainly often dismissed when discussing their own mental health,” she said. “There has to be a more open space to talk about it. People shouldn’t be ashamed of themselves.

Whether the race continues or not, Ryan’s legacy prevails. Howell remembers the time his daughter, Ellyn, went to Bagel Bakery, one of Ryan’s favorite places, to ask for a donation for the run.

“Do you remember my brother? She pleaded at the bakery. “His name was Ryan.

“Oh my God, I know Ryan,” replied an employee. “What do you need? We’ll do anything.

A compassionate and communicative community can make a difference in the life of someone in difficulty, said Howell.

“People need to speak to people, whether it’s the children who speak to other children, to their families, to the teachers,” she said. “These kids, we can’t expect them to know if this is something that is a phase or if it is a mental illness in its own right; they do not know. All they know is that they are in a difficult situation at a difficult time.

If you or a loved one is struggling with mental health issues or thoughts of suicide, please call the National Suicide Hotline at 800-273-8255 or visit https://nami.org/Home for resource information.


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15+ Kalimba songs your child (or you!) Can learn in one evening https://micgillette.com/15-kalimba-songs-your-child-or-you-can-learn-in-one-evening/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 05:03:45 +0000 https://micgillette.com/15-kalimba-songs-your-child-or-you-can-learn-in-one-evening/ Tanongsak Kusalodom / EyeEm / Getty Images If you have a music-obsessed kid and are looking for the perfect way to introduce them to all things about owning a musical instrument, the kalimba is a great place to start. Once your little music prodigy (#ThingsMomsSay) gets his kalimba, he’ll be super excited to see how […]]]>


Tanongsak Kusalodom / EyeEm / Getty Images

If you have a music-obsessed kid and are looking for the perfect way to introduce them to all things about owning a musical instrument, the kalimba is a great place to start. Once your little music prodigy (#ThingsMomsSay) gets his kalimba, he’ll be super excited to see how easy it is to learn to play. YouTube is full of great tutorials on kalimba songs, including pop culture favorites like TikTok songs and even some modern love songs for you mom. There is also a tutorial to learn “Baby Shark”, so that the big brother or the big sister can entertain his siblings. And any kid who is a Minecraft fan will love the fact that they can tear off their own random “song” and it will sound exactly like Minecraft music.

Need more conviction that (a) you should even buy your child something designed to make noise, and (b) that thing should be a kalimba? Listen to us. Kalimbas are relatively inexpensive. Unlike spending a few hundred dollars on a “cheap” electric guitar (or even more on a piano), buying a kalimba won’t make a huge dent in your savings. You can get a decent and even fairly well-known brand of kalimba from Amazon for around $ 30. Like any other instrument, a kalimba requires a little maintenance and your child will need to learn to tune it. While it’s work (Ugh), it is certainly not too complicated and much easier than doing these same tasks on a bigger or more expensive instrument. Did we mention that the “noise” created by the kalimbas is magnificent? If you have to listen to something all afternoon, this is a great option.

By now you should be convinced by this idea. So let’s talk more about this unique instrument, what it is to kalimba songs that your family can learn first.

What is the kalimba?

A kalimba – or thumb piano, as it is commonly called – is the modern version of an African instrument known as the mbira. It is believed that the Shona people of Zimbabwe made them for the first time. The kalimba or mbira will almost always be a flat wooden plank (usually) with metal teeth set at staggering lengths and heights. Most often there are 17 teeth to play on. However, as with most instruments, you can find different variations with fewer or more teeth. The kalimba is classified as a lamellophone, which is part of the family of idiophone instruments.

Is the kalimba easy to learn?

Yes! Kalimba is actually considered one of the easiest instruments to use, and there are a number of reasons for this. Unlike instruments like the piano or guitar, you don’t need all of your fingers to be particularly strong or skillful.

Kalimba players typically only use their two thumbs and one or both index fingers to pull out teeth. Since these fingers are usually your strongest, you’re already off to a good start. You will use your remaining fingers to sit under the kalimba board and help stabilize it. So these fingers are still useful, but you don’t need that much dexterity.

You also don’t have a lot of keys or finger positions to memorize. It all works in the natural movements of your dominant fingers. In addition, it is not uncommon for kalimba teeth to be marked with their “notes”, which makes it even easier for a new player to quickly understand.

What tips from kalimba could help you?

So, you bought a kalimba… what now? Although kalimbas are tiny, they still require a bit of care and maintenance. Knowing the best way to take care of your kalimba will ensure that it lasts a long time and brings you tons of joy. We think this video does a great job of breaking everything down into an easy and manageable task.

What songs can you play on a kalimba?

The world is your shell. The kalimba may have fewer teeth than a piano has keys, but it is nonetheless capable of producing a wide range of sounds. As such, with a good ear and a little practice, there is virtually no limit to the songs you can turn into kalimba songs. Of course, some are easier to learn than others.

What are some easy kalimba songs?

Much like singing a song or using any other instrument, the easiest songs to learn are those that are somewhat repetitive or that use a small number of notes instead of moving up and down the scale. With that in mind, songs like “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” are some of the best places to start. But there are a few more that regular kalimba players suggest you try, too.

1. “Twinkle, twinkle, little star”

2. “You are my sun”

3. “Happy birthday”

4. “Baby shark”

5. “Jingle Bells”

6. “Itsy Bitsy Spider”

7. “Baby shark”

Kalimba songs not easy but certainly cool

1. “Wellerman” – Les Trilles (Yes, the TikTok song)

2. “Perfect” – Ed Sheeran

3. “The sound of silence” – Simon & Garfunkel

4. “Zombie” – Cranberries

5. The game of thrones Theme

6. “Bohemian Rhapsody” – Queen

7. “Believer” – Imagine dragons

8. “Love story” – Taylor Swift

9. “Wild Love” – ​​Jason Derulo

Want even more? Just tap YouTube!


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Dennis Quaid to share songs and stories in solo acoustic performance on Wednesday https://micgillette.com/dennis-quaid-to-share-songs-and-stories-in-solo-acoustic-performance-on-wednesday/ https://micgillette.com/dennis-quaid-to-share-songs-and-stories-in-solo-acoustic-performance-on-wednesday/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 23:33:05 +0000 https://micgillette.com/dennis-quaid-to-share-songs-and-stories-in-solo-acoustic-performance-on-wednesday/ For the past two decades, fans of Dennis Quaid have been able to find the famous actor and musician on stage with The Sharks, his rock and country-soul group. But this week he’s coming to town on his own. Quaid returns to City Winery in Chicago on Wednesday, November 10, this time without The Sharks, […]]]>


For the past two decades, fans of Dennis Quaid have been able to find the famous actor and musician on stage with The Sharks, his rock and country-soul group. But this week he’s coming to town on his own.

Quaid returns to City Winery in Chicago on Wednesday, November 10, this time without The Sharks, as part of what he calls his “My Lucky Life” tour.

“I have to pinch myself, the way life has led me into these situations that I never imagined I would be a part of,” he said.

Quaid’s 12-city journey across the East Coast and Midwest will see him perform intimate solo shows with just a guitar, piano, and a career filled with stories to tell.

“It’s fantastic. It’s like people are coming out of their holes. We’ve been locked up for so long, and it’s time to start living again… within reason,” he said. “People want to go out, and I think we’re all ready. It’s like remembering your life again.”

Quaid was inspired to play music when his grandfather gave him a guitar, launching an artistic career that predated his Hollywood fame.

“I tried to learn ‘Light My Fire’ as a first song, which is not good for a beginner to learn,” he said. “So I turned to Johnny Cash because he wrote stories and he had simple chords. I think he was probably my main influence, Johnny Cash, and probably still is.”

In addition to old-school country classics and fan favorite covers, Quaid will be sharing much of his original work, including his latest single “Heartbeat,” which he released in late October.

“I wanted to write a love song without using the word ‘love’,” he said. “The song came out of a dream and the atmosphere is very dreamlike. It’s about the feeling of loving someone so much that they’re in your bones, that they’re just part of you.”

And, of course, there will be a nod or two to “The Killer” Jerry Lee Lewis, whom Quaid portrayed in the 1989 film “Great Balls of Fire!” According to Quaid, he didn’t know how to play the piano when he got the part, and Lewis was one of his first teachers.

“He taught me that the left hand is really what you need to have. It’s an athletic move that you really have to practice, practice like an athlete so you can do it even for three minutes at a time. the plateau everyday looking over my shoulder saying, ‘You’re wrong, son!’ “Quaid said with a laugh. “He was really very generous.

Quaid will share stories like the one from his musical and acting careers in what viewers have noted as a gripping performance.

“I guarantee you a good time,” he said, “or your money is refunded.”


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ABBA will no longer make music, says Benny Andersson https://micgillette.com/abba-will-no-longer-make-music-says-benny-andersson/ https://micgillette.com/abba-will-no-longer-make-music-says-benny-andersson/#respond Thu, 28 Oct 2021 14:41:24 +0000 https://micgillette.com/abba-will-no-longer-make-music-says-benny-andersson/ ABBA’s Benny Andersson said the band will no longer be making music after completing their comeback album Trip. The Swedish quartet, which split in 1982, spent several years working on the LP and its associated virtual stage show, which opens in a custom-built theater in London next year. But in a recent interview with The […]]]>


ABBA’s Benny Andersson said the band will no longer be making music after completing their comeback album Trip. The Swedish quartet, which split in 1982, spent several years working on the LP and its associated virtual stage show, which opens in a custom-built theater in London next year. But in a recent interview with The Guardian, Andersson said that two songs remained unfinished from Trip would stay that way and the band would never come back to the studio again.

“This is it,” he said. “It must be, you know. In fact, I didn’t say “this is it” in 1982. I never thought ABBA was never going to happen again. But I can tell you now: this is it. He added that this decision had nothing to do with personal issues, which were all in the past. “We’ve seen each other over the years, we meet for this and that. We’re friends. I mean, Bjorn and Agnetha have kids and grandchildren together, so they have to be on good terms! I’m also friends with Frida, so no problem there.

In fact, said Bjorn Ulvaeus, they really enjoyed working together again. “It was just fun, really, trying to see if we could do something,” he explained. “I think everyone was keenly aware that if what we were doing was not up to what we all wanted, we would just forget about it. There was no pressure in this regard. He added that he and Andersson deliberately ignored outside influences when they started the writing process around 2016.

“We decided early on that we weren’t going to watch anything else,” he said. “We’re just going to do the songs, the best songs that we can right now. It meant writing lyrics where I could delve into some of my thoughts from the past 40 years and add a kind of depth that will hopefully come with age, and that makes it different from the lyrics I wrote there. 40 years ago.

Andersson noted that the original plan was to write just two songs for a project that they later abandoned. “If we had gone out on the road we would have had a few new songs – everyone else did,” he said. “Once we started it really got me cooking – you know, maybe we can do a few more, work on things that have been around for a long time, not knowing what to do with it. “

Top 100 classic rock artists

Click to see how they rank, as we count the top 100 classic rock artists.


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