high school – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 19:43:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://micgillette.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-2021-08-02T161817.082-150x150.png high school – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ 32 32 A musician honors his gift from God https://micgillette.com/a-musician-honors-his-gift-from-god/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 10:15:10 +0000 https://micgillette.com/a-musician-honors-his-gift-from-god/ When Sean Kelly isn’t on stage rocking his guitar in front of thousands of fans, he can be found in a classroom with his students or at home with his wife and two young sons. Lead guitarist for award-winning Canadian singer Nelly Furtado, Kelly is the founder of Toronto rock band Crash Kelly and has […]]]>

When Sean Kelly isn’t on stage rocking his guitar in front of thousands of fans, he can be found in a classroom with his students or at home with his wife and two young sons.

Lead guitarist for award-winning Canadian singer Nelly Furtado, Kelly is the founder of Toronto rock band Crash Kelly and has toured with such legendary artists as Alice Cooper. But he is also a music teacher at both St. Timothy’s Catholic School and Canadian Martyrs Catholic School in Toronto, where he teaches instrumental and vocal music to grades 7 and 8 from kindergarten to 6th year. While it may seem like a double life to some, for Kelly it’s all part of who he is.

“I think I’m honoring a gift,” Kelly said. ” I believe him. I think music is a gift from God and I feel I have to honor it in the best way possible.

He’s been in love with the sound of rock and roll music since growing up in North Bay in the 1980s. With a pawnshop guitar and an old amplifier given to him at Christmas in 1984, he began to trying to emulate his favorite artists such as Van Halen, Def Leppard and Mötley Crüe. Growing up, he found solace in music in many forms, from performing in his church choir to practicing rock and roll with his friends. Like many teenagers, he struggled with insecurities and through music found a sense of belonging among others who shared his passion.

The call to teach snuck up on him. He studied music at the University of Toronto and started playing with bands, landed record deals and started touring. He decided to take a break from touring to go to teachers’ college. His plan was to be a substitute teacher to supplement his music career, but he ended up “falling in love with it”. He started teaching in 2000 and for the past 22 years he’s been in the classroom, making time for gigs touring here and there. He also spent time teaching the music business to high school students on First Nations reserves and mentoring young artists.

As an educator, Kelly ultimately tries to show her students that music is a universal language with the power to create a sense of community and belonging for all, regardless of superficial differences used to divide people. Throughout history, he teaches, music has been a tool of unity. From racial segregation in North America and beyond, music has brought people together and helped show that inside all human beings are essentially the same.

“I think ultimately I’m called to be a teacher based on my experiences,” Kelly said. “I have seen many things in my life. It’s funny, I’ve talked (to my students) about African-Canadian and African-American musicians and artists. I tell them how jazz music has been one of the main sources of unity in bringing together black musicians and white musicians. What a vehicle for social justice it was and how many barriers have come down where politicians have failed and society has failed. I find that music is a way to speak to our greater humanity and is a great common thread.

Balancing his life as a teacher, husband, father, and rock musician has been a synergistic dance over the years. Keeping his family first has been the key that has kept him grounded. These days, raising his seven- and 10-year-old sons holds him back as much as possible. A family affair, his wife and children are also music lovers and his children take piano lessons.

More than a profession, Kelly says music is still her favorite pastime. He’s amassed an impressive collection of guitars over the years and after a long day, tinkering with the guitar is still his favorite way to unwind. It’s a time to reflect on the experiences throughout the day and let the energy of the music reverberate through your fingers. Since childhood, music has always been synonymous with camaraderie, friendship and spiritual connection.

“In church, music is a form of prayer,” Kelly said. “I wonder if it’s always been that way (for me). If you’re still trying to honor the gift God has given you, maybe that’s a form of prayer. Interesting thought.

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The biggest bands on the planet https://micgillette.com/the-biggest-bands-on-the-planet/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 23:00:35 +0000 https://micgillette.com/the-biggest-bands-on-the-planet/ Tim Van Schmidt | New SCENE Over the years, many people have entrusted me with their record collection. They’re usually downsizing, moving, or just getting rid of stuff – and I find loads of old stuff interesting. Recently, I was finally able to listen to an unusual record I received in such a pile – […]]]>

Tim Van Schmidt | New SCENE

Over the years, many people have entrusted me with their record collection. They’re usually downsizing, moving, or just getting rid of stuff – and I find loads of old stuff interesting.

Recently, I was finally able to listen to an unusual record I received in such a pile – a five-track mini-LP recorded by the Fort Collins High School Symphonic Band of 1963-64. Under the direction of conductor Curtis Johnson, the disc is an example of the success of school music programs.

My high school marching band circa 1973

Forget that description – “school music programs” – for a moment. When I listened to this disc, containing compositions by DeNardis, Bach, Nelson, Reed and Seitz, I was struck by the success of these MUSICIANS. The sounds they made made me listen and enjoy what they were doing. They weren’t just students, they were artists.

What did I like? Through the twists in the music, the changes in dynamics, and the blending of a lot of instrumental vocals, I think this band really knew the music. I could hear a real attachment to that.

It is not enough to learn to play an instrument at school. It is not enough to play the right notes on the sheet music. What it takes is a group vision to create something good and the FCHS Symphonic Band of 1963-64 had that.

1963-64 FCHS Symphonic Band record released

My early experiences with music in schools, in my hometown of Illinois, were not so fruitful.

The day came when beginning music teachers first asked us to choose an instrument – in addition to the “flute-o-phone”, that is. I had just watched Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass on TV and wanted to play marimba. But the school only had one marimba and they gave it to another student.

Then I asked to play the drums, but, as you’d expect, a lot of other little boys (and girls) at my school wanted to play the drums, so I didn’t make that list either. .

Interestingly enough, several years later when I was visiting my grandmother, the next door neighbor came to visit and it turned out that the girl who got the marimba for me was her granddaughter. She informed me that her granddaughter had become “state champion” with her instrument.

I guess the school made the right choice.

I had to move to Phoenix, Arizona to get back into music at school. One day I found myself going to school with a paper clip in my hand and was placed in the beginner group. From then on, I played in the orchestras of all the schools I attended.

In elementary school in Phoenix, I played in bands “B” and “A” and got my first taste of the scene. In high school in California, I joined the marching band, which was also a concert band in the spring. This was also the case when I graduated from high school in Washington State.

These experiences were just awesome. It was an extra social scene for us, we got out of PE, we got to travel, and we got to play music together. There was a special bond between the band members that made it exciting – and at times the music really rocked.

Once I graduated from high school, I put down the trombone and kind of got lost in guitars and rock and roll

My interest in school music programs was reignited when my daughter attended Lincoln Junior High here in Fort Collins. She was in the beginner group and I attended one of their programs.

I was shocked when they successfully played Holst’s composition, “Mars.” I was impressed enough to write to the band manager to congratulate him and the band for attempting such a dynamic piece. Much to my daughter’s chagrin, the director read the letter aloud to the group.

Plus, I’ve loved hearing and seeing the CSU Ram Band perform at over a decade of football games, emphasizing that school music programs don’t just end with high school. Time and time again, I watched the Ram Band stir people up in the stands, then completely take over the pitch at halftime for high-profile entertainment.

CSU Ram Band helps launch the new stadium 2017 (photo by Tim Van Schmidt)

One of the greatest days of all was Band Day, when CSU hosted groups of high school students from across the region in a large rally. On one occasion I watched the whole football field full of bands, and wondered if I could see the biggest band in the world at that time – I estimated there were around 500 musicians on the field playing together.

Here’s the thing – these are all great bands; really, the biggest bands in the world in terms of really giving kids the opportunity to enjoy success with music.

Of course, today’s music programs have much more to offer. At FCHS today, for example, the music program includes orchestras, bands and choirs. But more than that, they also offer courses in “Unified Music, Music Technology, AP and Beginner Music Theory, Beginner and Advanced Guitar and Piano, and Rock and Pop History.” Fantastic!

Finding this FCHS file from so long ago was such a powerful reminder of an important part of my life. It also sounded very good.

It’s a recording that has reached out to me for 59 years with a message: support school music programs.

Tim Van Schmidt is a Fort Collins-based writer and photographer. Check out his YouTube channel on “Time Capsules by Tim Van Schmidt”.

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‘Flapping fists, jumping feet’ | Winter Jam 22 performs an “energetic” concert at Penn State’s BJC | Way of life https://micgillette.com/flapping-fists-jumping-feet-winter-jam-22-performs-an-energetic-concert-at-penn-states-bjc-way-of-life/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 17:17:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/flapping-fists-jumping-feet-winter-jam-22-performs-an-energetic-concert-at-penn-states-bjc-way-of-life/ From sparklers and flamethrowers to thousands of heads bowed in prayer, Winter Jam 22 welcomed members of the community to listen to various Christian musicians perform. The free concert took place at the Bryce Jordan Center on Friday, although attendees were encouraged to donate $10 upon admission. Acts included Skillet, Tauren Wells, KB, Colton Dixon, […]]]>

From sparklers and flamethrowers to thousands of heads bowed in prayer, Winter Jam 22 welcomed members of the community to listen to various Christian musicians perform.

The free concert took place at the Bryce Jordan Center on Friday, although attendees were encouraged to donate $10 upon admission.

Acts included Skillet, Tauren Wells, KB, Colton Dixon, I Am They, NewSong, Shane Pruitt, Abby Robertson and Bayside Worship, according to the tour’s website.

Additionally, actor Kevin Quinn – with notable roles in Disney Channel’s “Bunk’d” and the movie “A Week Away” – sang his latest single, “It’s About Time.”

During the PreJam, Bayside Worship performed, followed by Abby Robertson and Megan Duke.

“Let it go for God,” Duke said.

Abby Robertson sang her new single ‘Without Your Love’ before a Liberty University spokesperson spoke to the audience.

I Am They kicked off the show with their song “Faithful God.”

“Look at you all beautiful humans,” said Matthew Hein of I Am They.

The band went on to play four more songs before DJ GBaby took the stage for his intro.

NewSong followed the promotion of CONQER MUSIC – a minority-owned music and video platform “based on biblical principles”, the CONQER website said.

The band NewSong added a bit of country to the night of worship.

“External vocals only,” said a NewSong member.

Colton Dixon joined NewSong on stage for a combined performance of “Arise my Love.”

A spokesperson for Who’s Your One asked the public if they know “anyone who doesn’t know God”.

“We have something that Amazon cannot offer – the love of Jesus Christ,” the spokesperson said.

When KB entered the scene, the BJC bumps.

KB began rapping his hits like “Not Today Satan” and finished with the much-loved “Church Clap.”

During his set, KB asked the audience if he had been the victim of “generational criticism” on social media and in real life.






Christain Hip Hop artist KB preforms his set at Winter Jam, the self-proclaimed “Greatest Christian Music Tour” on Friday, March 4, 2022, at the Bryce Jordan Center in University Park, Pennsylvania.




Often, says KB, the faith of the younger generation is challenged by older generations.

“Let’s go pump your fists and jump your feet,” KB said. “We are right here.”

During “Church Clap”, KB asked the audience to create a “historic ride”, “lose [their] spirits” and “shake the building”.

KB ended their performance with the song “100” along with a short rap.

“My happy wife, Jesus loves me,” KB said. “I have nothing left to conform to.”

Another Liberty University spokesperson spoke about the university and said he knows “the one thing that can bring generations together.”

“It’s ‘Fireflies’ from Owl City,” he said during the song’s opening notes.

After “Fireflies,” evangelism speaker Shane Pruitt discussed the idea of ​​having a purpose in life.

Pruitt said “the word of God is Jesus” and asked the audience to “repent [their] sins” with them.

“Jesus is a better savior than we are sinners,” Pruitt said.

Tauren Wells danced on stage alongside his Christian pop songs.

After performing “Hills and Valleys,” Wells said “Thank You, Jesus” as he gazed up at the ceiling.

Another spokesperson for Compassion International, a humanitarian aid organization, shared his story with the adoption and sponsorship of a child in Kenya.

Compassion International volunteers distributed flyers to interested members of the public.

For those who made the first month’s deposit to sponsor a child, they were able to attend a special post-event “outing” with John Cooper, lead singer of Skillet.

During intermission, 14-year-old Ella Whyssler said her group of high school kids from Mount Union, Pennsylvania attended the concert together.

“Everything is so lively and energetic,” Whyssler said. “It’s like being with my second family.”

To begin the second half of the performance, Colton Dixon once again took the stage to perform, followed by Abby Robertson.







Dixon Winter Jam

Singer-songwriter Colton Dixon performs at Winter Jam, the self-proclaimed “greatest tour in Christian music,” Friday, March 4, 2022, at the Bryce Jordan Center in University Park, Pennsylvania.




NewSong’s Russ Lee shared the tour story – and mentioned that the band’s next location will be in Cleveland, Ohio.

“How many of you know that the people of Ohio need Jesus? Lee said. “Don’t hate them, pray for them.”

For the finale, Skillet brought energy to BJC as everyone stood up as the members entered the stage.

“Looks like you guys are ready to rock and roll,” Cooper said.

As the guitarists’ platforms rose and fell, fire erupted from the machines behind Cooper and the drummer.

During Skillet’s performance of his latest album “Dominion”, Cooper had fog machines strapped to his wrists.

“A lot of people have asked us why we named our album ‘Dominion,'” Cooper told the audience. “Because it looks sick.”

As the rest of Skillet’s band members left the stage, Cooper stayed onstage to discuss social media issues forcing young children to “deny” their spiritual “truths.”

“Parents, your children are being molested seven days a week,” Cooper said. “God is the only one who should make the rules.”

Cooper continued to discuss the “false ideologies” presented to young audiences on social media.

After Skillet’s performance, the hosts ended the concert with a prayer.

“It’s not just a concert,” Lee said. “It’s a spiritual movement.”

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Kearsarge Regional High School Student of the Month: Quinlan Ferren | Community https://micgillette.com/kearsarge-regional-high-school-student-of-the-month-quinlan-ferren-community/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/kearsarge-regional-high-school-student-of-the-month-quinlan-ferren-community/ NEW LONDON – Superintendent Winfried Feneberg is pleased to announce Kearsarge Regional High School’s Student of the Month for February. Quinlan Ferren, a Wilmot sophomore, was selected for the honor based on nominations from school staff. This honor recognizes the student’s positive conduct and character, both on and off campus, and acknowledges positive moral character […]]]>

NEW LONDON – Superintendent Winfried Feneberg is pleased to announce Kearsarge Regional High School’s Student of the Month for February.

Quinlan Ferren, a Wilmot sophomore, was selected for the honor based on nominations from school staff. This honor recognizes the student’s positive conduct and character, both on and off campus, and acknowledges positive moral character and contributions to the school community.

“Quin is an incredibly respectful and hardworking student. He works well with others and values ​​supporting students with needs,” said social studies teacher Sandy Nelson. “He helps a student with special needs in my class by re-teaching concepts, vocabulary and ideas to support that student’s learning. Quin leads by example. His ability to connect with others and support their learning is to be commended. »

Ferren thanks the teachers for encouraging him to succeed. He particularly enjoyed the introduction to woodworking and guidance from business professor Jesse Fenn during the experiential learning.

“I really like being able to work on a hands-on project and have a say in what I do. It’s a good way to show Mr. Fenn what we’re learning instead of just creating something that he tells us. gave to build,” he said.

Ferren, the son of Amy Gignac and Justin Ferren, is a talented keyboard player. He performs with his father (guitar) and younger sister Mara (vocals) in the Ferns Family Band. The group performs at local events and venues and has been featured in “New Hampshire Chronicle”. Ferren is currently supporting his sister by playing the keyboard as she competes in the Unsung Heroes vocal competition hosted by The Music Room in West Yarmouth, Mass.

After graduation, Ferren would like to combine his Kearsarge education, community experience and lifelong interest in trucks and equipment. His goal is to start a property maintenance, land management or excavation business.

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Ardenne High nurtures world-class musical talent | Arts & Hobbies https://micgillette.com/ardenne-high-nurtures-world-class-musical-talent-arts-hobbies/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 05:08:11 +0000 https://micgillette.com/ardenne-high-nurtures-world-class-musical-talent-arts-hobbies/ Ardenne High School was founded by American Church of God missionaries George and Nellie Olson in 1927 and the school quickly established its reputation as the epicenter of academic excellence. Over the decades, few schools in the Caribbean can claim the dazzling achievements of the Ardennes. The school has several scholarships from Jamaica and Rhodes […]]]>

Ardenne High School was founded by American Church of God missionaries George and Nellie Olson in 1927 and the school quickly established its reputation as the epicenter of academic excellence. Over the decades, few schools in the Caribbean can claim the dazzling achievements of the Ardennes. The school has several scholarships from Jamaica and Rhodes and decades of outstanding achievement in regional exams, having been named CAPE School of the Year on several occasions. Ardenne has won the School Challenge Quiz a record seven times and the school remains the only Caribbean institution to win the Scripps National Spelling Bee Championship in the United States when a precocious Jody-Anne Maxwell became the first black student to win the cup in 1996, also becoming the first winner outside the United States.

But Ardenne is more than a book and a brain. Beyond academics, the institution has for many years fostered an impressive musical legacy that is now paying off in multiple Grammy wins for the school’s creative prodigies. A continued wave of talent nurtured in the Ardennes culminated in recent Grammy wins for graduates Koffee and Stephen McGregor. Additionally, in recent years, under the leadership of Principal Nadine Molloy, the school has made other impressive achievements in the performing arts, repeatedly winning the Marcus Garvey Award for Excellence in the Performing Arts Competition. stage of the Jamaica Cultural Development Commission (JCDC). The annual Ardennes Christmas Spectacular and Fireworks Show, which engages a staggering six hundred students at all levels of production, is a contemporary Jamaican interpretation of the Christmas message through music, speech, singing and dancing.

“The extra-curricular commitments in Ardenne are second to none,” said Andrae Wilson, music teacher and club entertainer. the gleanerit’s arts and education. “The variety of skills learned is more than adequate and powerful not only to prepare students for the arts, but for life in general,” he reiterated.

ENJOY SUCCESS

Ardennes graduates have enjoyed success in the performing arts since the 1960s, thanks to two important early pioneers and contributors to the music program there. One was the accomplished musicologist Daphne Vidal Smith who, after teaching music in Ardennes, became the founding director of the Mona Preparatory School. Ardenne also benefited from the expertise of conductor, composer and Royal School of Music graduate Lloyd Hall, who also taught there. Prominent lawyer Florence ‘Flo’ Darby excelled as a singer under the tutelage of regional music icon Noel Dexter, who shaped outstanding choirs in the Ardennes for many years, and Darby received several medals at the Concours of the National Festival before joining the University Singers.

“Noel Dexter taught me everything I know about music,” Darby shared with arts and education when the award-winning composer and director of the UWI choir died in 2019, and Darby later became Dexter’s sounding board on his behalf for his catalog of outstanding compositions in the following years.

Other stars include Joyce Britton, who shone brightly in classical music in Canada, and award-winning singer Esther Tyson, who later served as Ardenne’s principal. Raggamuffin singjay Koffee, born Mikayla Simpson, graduated from Ardenne in 2017, learned music theory and singing techniques as a member of the school choir. Principal Nadine Molloy recalls that she was also part of the school’s women’s soccer team.

“It was a very good team and that’s where she sang to motivate her teammates. She also spent quite a bit of time with the performing arts students. I remember then-music teacher Canigia Palmer telling me she was one to watch in the future. So I can see where she would have been influenced by the general atmosphere of immense respect and positive portrayal of Jamaican culture in Ardennes,” added Molloy.

Lyrics of Koffee Grill provides insight into his musical journey with slices of throwback history.

“One time we sat in class and got bored. Den Oli said do road and mi gwan wid di road. 3rd form mi say mek mi try a ting. And you know that turned out to be a hit of fire. Now, on stage with Chronixx, I sing.

Her breakout performance came a year after her graduation at Rebel Salute 2018 (Grizzly’s Plantation Cove in St Ann) when Coco Tea touted her as Jamaica’s next big sensation. She was an immediate star, captivating fans with singles Raggamuffin and Burning. The following year she was invited back to the festival as a lead performer where she charmed fans with her growing catalog of hit singles, including Grilltwice selected by former US President Barack Obama for his summer 2019 and 2020 playlist. Months later, Koffee was in the record books as the first Jamaican female artist to win a Reggae Grammy Award for her debut album. Rapture. Koffee’s mother, Jo-Anne Williams, recalled the “Grammy-winning moment” during a recent radio interview in New York.

“I just started screaming! I was like, thank you Lord. Thank you, Jesus,” she exclaimed.

Singer, songwriter and music producer Stephen ‘Di Genius’ McGregor has also contributed to Ardennes’ legacy in the performing arts. “I didn’t know much about the Ardennes before going there, but it turned out to be one of the biggest decisions I could have made,” he said.

“It’s one of the best schools ever. It’s very welcoming. It motivates a lot of kids to believe in what they’re doing. That’s probably why so many of us are successful,” said he declared.

In 2017, McGregor, who played in the school band before graduation, won four Grammy Awards for Best Latin Pop Album El Dorado (songwriter and producer); best reggae album stony hill (songwriter and producer); best rap song Control (songwriter and producer) Latin Grammy Award and Best Contemporary Pop Vocal Album Eldorado (songwriter and producer). In 2020, he won his 5th Grammy for best R&B album ‘Bigger Love’ (songwriter and producer).

“He made a great choice to go to Ardenne,” said Stephen’s proud dad, world reggae icon Freddie McGregor. the gleaner.

The huge successes of Koffee and Di Genius testify to the emerging role that extracurricular activities have played in the lives of Ardennes students. In January, Koffee underlined this point of view during an interview on BBC 1Xtra in England.

DRIVE CREATIVITY

“The Ardennes is generally known for excelling in studies, but also for supporting young talent and helping young people to hone their skills and creativity,” she said.

Principal Molloy agrees. “At Ardenne, we want our students to achieve the highest academic standards, but, just as important, we view our students as spiritual beings who are more than their grades,” Molloy said. “We celebrate that with Koffee. It was born out of her experiences and she carved out a unique niche for herself. She has set an example for Ardennites around the world, wherever they are on their personal journey. Likewise, Brand Jamaica is reaping the rewards of another cultural creation that is making its mark on the world stage. This is not to be taken lightly,” Molloy said.

Dancehall DJ Alkaline also benefited from the co-curriculum in Ardenne. He played football before becoming a distinguished List A performer.

“He was the team’s resident entertainer,” Principal Molloy recalled. “You could say he always performed as he did in almost every show in Ardennes that catered to his genre. He was also a great moderator for our awards show.

There’s also drummer, keyboardist, radio disc jockey, producer and entertainer Left Side, son of We The People Band’s Lloyd Parks. He was a renowned basketball player on the winning team coached by Spidey Barrett for several years. He performed in Ardenne in the brass band. There’s also producer, sound engineer and mixer Mario ‘Mad Scientist’ Lawrence, the muscle behind Music Factory Studio. Lawrence has toured with Grammy-winning artist ‘Jr Gong’ Marley, Warrior King and I Wayne, and he has performed with Ernest Ranglin, Monty Alexander, TOK, Dean Fraser and Daville. Ardennes students have left their mark on popular local TV shows such as “All Together Sing” and “Digital Rising Stars”. And, looking back, there were also roots, reggae singer Hugh Mundel, who frequented Ardenne in the 1970s, and broadcaster Errol ‘ET’ Thompson, hailed as one of the most influential radio personalities in Jamaica from 1977 to 1980. They were joined by talented jaw-dropping students Lennox Gordon (guitar) and Ian ‘Tschaikovsky’ Johnson (keyboardist), both wanted for commercial studio sessions at Tuff Gong Records.

Assessing the outlook for 2022 and beyond, music teacher Andrae Wilson said the gleaner that the future of the Ardennes in the performing arts is in excellent hands.

“Our students have the potential to do great things. A few outstanding ones who have excelled in music are Diallo Malcolm (producer); Mathew Lobban (musician/producer); Abigail Dunstan (singer) and Leonardo Parkinson (singer and video director), while, in theater, stars include Aliyah Hall, Reece Lee, Melony Salmon and Shanelle Carey,” he noted.

“Ardenne fully embraces the concept of whole child development as an integral part of our unique school experience, and our music program embraces this reality,” said Nadine Molloy proudly. “We see our music program growing and expanding as new students and staff join us with skills in diverse styles and expressions of this powerful and enduring art form.”

anthonyhturner@gmail.com

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Delta High School recognizes the importance of Black History Month https://micgillette.com/delta-high-school-recognizes-the-importance-of-black-history-month/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/delta-high-school-recognizes-the-importance-of-black-history-month/ Through the efforts of staff and administration, students at Ladner High School learn about the month-long tribute and recognition in the classroom and beyond. Black History Month is front and center at Delta Secondary. Through the efforts of staff and administration, students at Ladner High School learn about the month-long tribute and recognition in the […]]]>

Through the efforts of staff and administration, students at Ladner High School learn about the month-long tribute and recognition in the classroom and beyond.

Black History Month is front and center at Delta Secondary.

Through the efforts of staff and administration, students at Ladner High School learn about the month-long tribute and recognition in the classroom and beyond.

This includes in the common learning area where teacher-librarian Ms. Loiselle used her impressive monthly banners to recognize prominent and influential people as well as the rich history of the black community in the province, including Hogan’s Alley in Vancouver.

Students can use their phone to scan the QR code on the banners to learn more about each individual or topic featured.

“At Delta Secondary, we do our best to raise awareness and educate about important topics such as Black History Month in a variety of ways,” explained DSS Director John Pavao. “Our Learning Commons exhibition is an example of how we are actively working towards our Vision 2030 mission statement: an innovative and inclusive community where all learners belong, and everyone soars. As a school, we value diversity and inclusion and strive to ensure that all school activities are inclusive, accessible and equitable for students. »

Pavao also noted how the staff takes the opportunity to raise awareness and educate their students through a curricular lens.

He understands:

-Mrs. Kates and DSS Anti-Racism Committee Black Excellence Day – awareness and promotion by the school anti-racism team (in conjunction with the district anti-racism committee).

-Mrs. Huff’s English Class 12 examines the Black experience in Canada through the lens of Desmond Cole’s documentary The skin I’m in and through various episodes of the CBC series Being Black in Canadagiving students a first understanding of the history of Black Canadians as well as their modern experiences and contributions to Canadian culture and society, as well as ongoing efforts for social justice.

-Guitar teacher M. Dobrovolny teaches several lessons around the history and impact of black musicians (music) – history and origins, impact on musical genres (rock and roll, blues, gospel) and how these musicians have influenced the music of today.

“Teachers and staff bring students and classes to our library to view our Black History Month exhibit and the many books and resources available for individuals to learn about the stories associated with this topic,” Pavao continued. “Our learning space is a dynamic and interactive space where classes come to supplement or enrich their learning – learn research and inquiry skills, access written and digital resources, student presentations and view monthly postings created by Mrs. Loiselle.”

Other banners she has created each year include: Remembrance Day, LGBTQ+, Truth and Reconciliation, Freedom to Read, Diverse Voices – Read Around the World, DSS Festival of Dangerous Ideas, DSS FUNctional Math Festival, DSS Criminolgy 12 Murder Mystery, DSS ComicCon and various genres.

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Little Green House: Anxious’ debut album features punk without politics https://micgillette.com/little-green-house-anxious-debut-album-features-punk-without-politics/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 01:14:42 +0000 https://micgillette.com/little-green-house-anxious-debut-album-features-punk-without-politics/ Connecticut band Anxious ring in the new year by releasing their debut album little green house in January. The first thing that jumps out at Anxious is the youth of its members: their ages range from around 19 to 21 years old. The musicians grew up together and have been playing in a band since […]]]>

Connecticut band Anxious ring in the new year by releasing their debut album little green house in January. The first thing that jumps out at Anxious is the youth of its members: their ages range from around 19 to 21 years old. The musicians grew up together and have been playing in a band since at least high school, which isn’t a very distant memory for any of them. Additionally, the album is named after the childhood home of the band’s lead singer, Grady Allen.

Anxious, little green house

Journalists described Anxious as having ties to the local hardcore punk scene. Hardcore was a faster, more intense version of punk rock that emerged in part as a reaction against the more romantic or consciously arty directions in which punk was moving around 1979. Hardcore songs tended to be short (sometimes less than one minute) and feature angry shouting, vaguely leftist political themes, and dark or provocative humor.

But Anxious has a closer musical resemblance to emo, a trend that grew out of hardcore and focused on feelings and relationships rather than politics. Influences from early emo bands Dag Nasty and Rites of Spring, and more recent and popular Jimmy Eat World and New Found Glory, can be heard on Anxious’ early days. The Connecticut band clearly paid close attention to the music of their predecessors.

From the first note of the first album, we notice how polite the group is, especially considering the youth of its members. Guitarists cleverly use basic techniques such as palm muting and harmonics to provide accents. Singers can carry a melody and even harmonize. But most impressive is the skillful, precise and powerful drumming of Jonny Camner, the most musically accomplished member. Camner provides much of the group’s energy.

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MASH group director honored as part of the ’40 Under 40′ group | https://micgillette.com/mash-group-director-honored-as-part-of-the-40-under-40-group/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 11:45:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/mash-group-director-honored-as-part-of-the-40-under-40-group/ A Crawford County music teacher was among a select group of educators recently honored by Yamaha Corporation of America. Armond Walter, Director of Instrumental Music at Meadville Area Senior High School (MASH), is part of Yamaha’s second annual “40 Under 40”. In announcing the recognition, the company described the group as “40 outstanding music educators […]]]>

A Crawford County music teacher was among a select group of educators recently honored by Yamaha Corporation of America.

Armond Walter, Director of Instrumental Music at Meadville Area Senior High School (MASH), is part of Yamaha’s second annual “40 Under 40”. In announcing the recognition, the company described the group as “40 outstanding music educators under 40 possessing characteristics of action, courage, creativity and growth while going above and beyond when teaching of music programs.

The recognition came after he was nominated by a member of the community who Yamaha officials said wished to remain anonymous, according to Walter, 35.

“It was quite a surprise,” he said.

The group of prominent young music educators included four honorees from Pennsylvania. In addition to Walter, Slippery Rock University music professor Jonathan Helmick, Springfield High band manager Mark Stanford and Blackhawk High band manager Brandon Tambellini were recognized.

Yamaha marketing manager Heather Mansell noted that the 80 teachers honored in the first two years of the program have devoted much of their effort during this period to adapting to the challenges presented by the COVID pandemic. -19 – challenges that struck a particularly sour note for music education.

“Despite another year of challenges, educators are undertaking the most innovative, creative and impactful programs to make a difference in strengthening and encouraging music education nationwide,” Mansell said. “Yamaha shares the same commitment to high-quality music education for all, and we look forward to supporting and encouraging the efforts of these 40 outstanding educators and thousands more like them across the country.”

Yamaha has described “40 Under 40” as a “music education promotion program”, and the recognition is mostly part of an awareness effort. No new keyboards or other prizes came with the prize, according to Walter, who was happy to be part of the attempt to promote music education.

“It’s going to motivate me to keep moving forward with my educational values,” Walter said about an hour after school earlier this week as a few remaining students noodle on bass guitar, keyboard and drums in the band room. MASH.

The connections, habits and skills shaped in such spaces help create strong incentives for students who otherwise might not be so invested in education, according to Walter, who was a member of the group himself. MASH before graduating from school in 2005.

“Music is my way of connecting with a wide range of students who can feel at home in my classroom,” he said, “because they are comfortable being themselves. without fear of judgment.”

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SOMERVILLE ARTIST PROFILE: AROUND HEARING https://micgillette.com/somerville-artist-profile-around-hearing/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 21:36:33 +0000 https://micgillette.com/somerville-artist-profile-around-hearing/ Bringing music to the community in an affordable way Violinist Marji Gere and pianist Dan Sedgwick are co-directors of Around Hear, an organization that aims to accessibly enrich the town of Somerville with the art of music. They offer free concerts and music lessons for low-income residents, inviting people to “gather, listen and learn”. I […]]]>

Bringing music to the community in an affordable way


Violinist Marji Gere and pianist Dan Sedgwick are co-directors of Around Hear, an organization that aims to accessibly enrich the town of Somerville with the art of music. They offer free concerts and music lessons for low-income residents, inviting people to “gather, listen and learn”. I reached out to Marji and Dan to ask about the programs they created and how they continued to pursue this form of expression.

Around Hear was created in 2017. How did you know you wanted to create a musical program together, and what was the inspiration?

I (Marji) obtained a grant from the Somerville Arts Council in the spring of 2017 to design and execute a citywide community program tour as a solo violinist. The twelve performances I gave on this tour exposed me to many different and wonderful after-school programs and other community programs around Somerville, but the highlight of the whole experience was the series of visits I have made to the Mystic Learning Center, which is based at the Mystic Activity Center of the Somerville Housing Authority. It shouldn’t have been surprising that I felt most comfortable at Mystic; I had been a volunteer for the Welcome Project (based in the same building as the Mystic Learning Center) since 2014, and I had already gotten to know the Mystic scene pretty well, and I knew I liked it. I received another grant in the fall of 2017 (from the St. Botolph Club Foundation in Boston) to provide more free community concerts in Somerville, and it only made sense to partner again with the Mystic Learning Center and the Somerville Housing Authority to make it happen. . Knowing that any long-term art project should involve Dan (my main collaborator and husband), Dan and I worked with Florence Bergmann, the (now retired) director of the Mystic Learning Center and other powers that be at the Housing Authority to donate a grand piano to the Mystic Activity Center. The experience of working with Florence and other tireless mystical leaders to achieve this challenge, and then to establish a series of regular free concerts and a program of free music lessons, has been the most rewarding experience of our professional lives.

You offer free community concerts and art-based social and educational events. Can you describe what they usually sound like and what attracts you to the music you perform?

Since the spring of 2017, Around Hear has held free public community concerts at Mystic Activity Center, a community center based at Somerville Housing Authority. In our planning and implementation of these events, we consider the comfort and happiness of audience members of all ages and backgrounds: to facilitate and enhance listening, we pair music with elements of theatre, storytelling, visual arts, puppetry or dance. ; we provide printed programs in Spanish, Portuguese, Haitian Creole and English; our programming features our students and other artists of color and their creative work; we strive to create a stigma-free space where people are welcome to walk around, create art, come and go, and yes, even audibly express themselves by listening.

One of the goals of this concert series is to create a long-standing community ritual of coming together for free, fun, high quality, uplifting and inclusive public music events in Somerville Housing Authority. By providing compelling, eclectic, and unique programming, prioritizing low-income residents’ access to these events, and welcoming music lovers and other curious people to the Boston metro area, we hope Around Hear will help break the socio-economic, racial, cultural and generational barriers that exist in our society.

Around Hear also offers free one-on-one music lessons to low-income Somerville residents. Can you tell us what you like about teaching, your approach to education and what it means to serve this particular community?

It is widely accepted by music teachers that regular, individual instruction is essential to musical mastery. While affluent Somervillians may choose to enroll their children in private lessons, this option is prohibitively expensive for low-income Somerville residents. Therefore, despite the school district’s efforts to make arts education inclusive and accessible, there is an arts achievement gap in school and city cultures.

Around Hear’s main goal is to fill this gap by offering free, weekly, one-on-one music lessons, performance opportunities and concerts, and to make these experiences accessible by offering them at the Mystic Activity Center, based in the largest public of the Somerville Housing Authority. housing development. Currently, we meet with 24 students, aged 6 to 70+, for one-to-one lessons each week.

As teachers, we continue to embrace the challenging and joyful work of helping each student find their own meaningful path in music. Each week, we strive to provide our students with opportunities to expand their musical horizons, use their musical instruments to tap into their family and cultural traditions, and explore their personal interests. It’s fun work that requires patience, humor and commitment from everyone involved.

I know that Marji is a violinist and Dan is a pianist. What were your experiences as a musician and how did you first learn these instruments?

We were both fortunate to grow up in families with parents who played musical instruments and listened to a lot of music at home, and in cities with strong public school music programs: Marji in Davenport , IA, and Dan in Worcester, MA. We had the opportunity to play in a variety of high school ensembles: orchestra, orchestra, jazz band and other small groups. While Marji focused on the violin and Dan on the piano, we were also encouraged to explore other instruments: Marji played percussion and piano; Dan played French horn and guitar. We both studied music in college (Marji majored in violin performance and English, Dan in composition), and we were also lucky enough to find our way to the Apple Summer Festival. Hill Center for Chamber Music, Nelson, NH in the late 1990s where we met and started playing chamber music together.

You have a concert just before Valentine’s Day. Can you tell us a bit about what this performance will look like?

Thanks for asking the question! Our next free community concert Around Hear is scheduled for the afternoon of Saturday, February 12 at the Mystic Activity Center (530 Mystic Ave). For this event, we are trying something new: while we play music from 2-5pm, viewers are welcome to come and go as they wish, stay just for a moment or as long as they wish. We will provide our usual communal drawing paper and pencils, as well as valentines to write on in response to the music, or audience members can bring their own art, writing, knitting (etc! etc!) .!) to enjoy while they listen. We will play the complete sonatas for piano and violin by Johannes Brahms, the most romantic music we know! For security reasons, participation in this event is limited. If you would like to come, please RSVP here.

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“Breathtaking” tuition fees putting parents under the pump https://micgillette.com/breathtaking-tuition-fees-putting-parents-under-the-pump/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 13:05:03 +0000 https://micgillette.com/breathtaking-tuition-fees-putting-parents-under-the-pump/ Futurity Investment Group research released Tuesday shows that 39% of public and private schools are likely to raise fees this year. For Paul, a father of two in Adelaide, the rapidly mounting costs are jeopardizing the private school plans he had for his children, even if his eldest starts year one at a private Catholic […]]]>

Futurity Investment Group research released Tuesday shows that 39% of public and private schools are likely to raise fees this year.

For Paul, a father of two in Adelaide, the rapidly mounting costs are jeopardizing the private school plans he had for his children, even if his eldest starts year one at a private Catholic school this year.

Paul said the school raised fees by about $300 last year and the family is currently paying about $3,000 for basic tuition.

But their daughter’s uniform cost $800 more this year, and the family also had to buy an iPad for homework.

Paul expects to pay about $20,000 per year per child for private school tuition when his children reach high school, and an additional $6,000 on top for other necessities such as uniforms, devices, and excursions.

This Adelaide family’s dream of a private school education seems increasingly out of reach. Source: Supplied

But he doesn’t expect his and his wife’s combined income to be enough to cover the cost of their children’s schooling.

“We have to start saving because we are not going to compromise on our children’s education,” he said.

“Maybe we can jeopardize our travels, maybe eating out, and all those things, which aren’t that important, but raising the kids is the most important thing for us.”

“If you are [not] in a high income bracket, sending your child… to one of these great schools is quite difficult, it’s not for a normal person.

“Breathtaking” Five-Figure Public School Price

The average rate for 13 years of study at a private school in Australia starts at over $100,000, but data from the Futurity Investment Group shows government tuition fees aren’t far behind.

A public school education in Sydney is the most expensive in the country, averaging $92,375 in total.

Although the average salary for a full-time Australian has reached just under $96,000, Futurity group leader Kate Hill said the cost of public education in cities like Sydney is “quite mind-blowing”, and that the income of the parents will not be able to continue.

“The cost of education outweighs any wage growth for parents,” Ms Hill said.

“So it’s becoming more and more difficult to find the funds to educate children.”

She said parents asking for “more and more” services is costing schools money, which has caused the cost of education to rise at twice the rate of inflation according to research by Futurity Investment Group.

But keeping students at home is not a get-out-of-jail card, as families bear the brunt of social isolation.

Additional cost of mental health support

Ms Hill said one of the services schools are spending more money on is mental health support.

For Jacinta, a mother of three based in Thornbury, the need for mental health support was overwhelmingly clear from the start of the pandemic in 2020.

She had two children enrolled in public school at the time, one of whom has since graduated.

Both the children and Jacinta have been taking advice during the pandemic, and her youngest child, who is entering grade 10 this year, has struggled the most with the loss of daily in-person school interactions.

For Jacinta, supporting her family’s mental well-being added to the pressure trying to support their upbringing.

The children’s teachers have struggled to fill the gaps in remote learning, even though the school has hired occasional substitute teachers to monitor students as well.

Jacinta ended up shelling out an extra $90 a week for math lessons for her two children and $30 a week for guitar lessons for her youngest child to help keep him engaged in his learning.

Her family weren’t the only ones facing extra costs to learn from home, as data from the Futurity Investment Group shows it cost an average of $1,856 on top of regular tuition for the children to attend the homeschooling in 2021.

Although her family has been able to get through the past two years taking care of their education and mental health, Jacinta said she realizes that not everyone is able to access the same services.

She said the “large equity gap”, which is present even in publicly funded education, has been highlighted during the pandemic.

“Because I teach…I know there were families that didn’t have enough devices for the kids at home, they had to share, or they didn’t have good WiFi,” he said. she declared.

“I kept saying to my friends and family, ‘What about people who don’t have the things I have? How do they deal with that?

When asked to comment on the issue of rising education costs, a spokesperson for Acting Education and Youth Minister Stuart Robert said the federal government does not set the tuition fees, which are instead set by state and territory governments and the institution for non-governmental organizations. schools.

The spokesperson said $315.2 billion is expected to be provided to schools between 2018 and 2029 under the government’s Quality Schools scheme, with more than $24 billion provided in 2022.

Commonwealth funding for state schools has also increased by more than 64% per pupil over the past 10 years, and by more than 49% in non-government schools, they said.

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