guitar playing – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 19:44:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://micgillette.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-2021-08-02T161817.082-150x150.png guitar playing – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ 32 32 The RMEF joins the fight against the Center for Biological Diversity https://micgillette.com/the-rmef-joins-the-fight-against-the-center-for-biological-diversity/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 22:29:38 +0000 https://micgillette.com/the-rmef-joins-the-fight-against-the-center-for-biological-diversity/ The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, headquartered in Missoula, announced this week that it is joining several other organizations in a lawsuit against The Center for Biological Diversity on access to public land. RMEF spokesman Mark Holyoak spoke to KGVO News on Wednesday. “We have a lot of people we agree with, but we’ve only partnered […]]]>

The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, headquartered in Missoula, announced this week that it is joining several other organizations in a lawsuit against The Center for Biological Diversity on access to public land.

RMEF spokesman Mark Holyoak spoke to KGVO News on Wednesday.

“We have a lot of people we agree with, but we’ve only partnered with a few of them regarding a lawsuit brought by an environmental organization, the Center for Biological Diversity,” said Holyoak. “They seek to prevent public access to much of our National Wildlife Refuge land, worth more than 2.3 million acres.”

Holyoak explained why the RMEF is joining the lawsuit.

“We’re just letting people know that’s just not the way things should be,” he said. “These are public lands. They must be open to hunting and fishing. Hunting and fishing play a key role in wildlife management and help biologists track wildlife numbers, and so we throw our hats in the ring and say this is a bad decision, and we want just letting people know we are involved and more importantly speaking on behalf of our members to make this happen.

Holyoak said the Center for Biological Diversity is “in the business of legal action” and explained RMEF’s position.

“Well, I guess two fronts. The first is that it’s just kind of what they do. They are in the business of litigation. That’s how they roll. And the other is that they throw out some obscure species and say that hunting and fishing would wipe them out across the country generally, but that’s just not how it works.

Holyoak named the organizations the RMEF has partnered with in the lawsuit.

“The others were the Safari Club, the International Sportsman’s Alliance and the National Rifle Association,” he said. “A lot of these groups are deeply hunter-based and involve hunters. So on this issue, we definitely agree with them and others and so it was just kind of a joint effort that we’re all saying, hey, you know what? Fish and Wildlife Service, we’re behind you, and our members are behind you. We are for regulated hunting and public access.

The Center for Biological Diversity wants to thwart access to hunting and fishing on 2.3 million acres of public land spread across 106 national wildlife refuges and hatcheries.

WATCH: John Dutton’s Yellowstone Ranch is real and here are 12 photos

10 Facts About “Yellowstone” You Probably Didn’t Know

How big is a fan Yellowstone are you? These 10 facts about the Paramount Network show are sure to surprise even the most devoted viewers. They relate to almost all actors and their real passions and roles. John’s children? Beth’s accent? Rainwater’s guitar playing? Tate spoilers? It’s all part of this list of 10 facts you probably didn’t know about Yellowstone.

Every restaurant in Montana that’s been featured on Food Network

It’s always great to see something from your hometown or state on TV. When Food Network comes to town, Montananese are ready. These restaurants were featured.

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Dry Cleaning’s Tom Dowse: “I play all day and it’s a big part of my life, but I just can’t think of myself as a guitarist!” https://micgillette.com/dry-cleanings-tom-dowse-i-play-all-day-and-its-a-big-part-of-my-life-but-i-just-cant-think-of-myself-as-a-guitarist/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 17:05:30 +0000 https://micgillette.com/dry-cleanings-tom-dowse-i-play-all-day-and-its-a-big-part-of-my-life-but-i-just-cant-think-of-myself-as-a-guitarist/ Dry Cleaning may be part of the new wave of British post-punk, but they sound quite unlike any of their contemporaries. Led by Florence Shaw’s spoken-word vocals, which span the everyday to the profound, debut album New Long Leg is also notable for the expansive, dynamic guitar playing of Tom Dowse, who strikes and caresses […]]]>

Dry Cleaning may be part of the new wave of British post-punk, but they sound quite unlike any of their contemporaries.

Led by Florence Shaw’s spoken-word vocals, which span the everyday to the profound, debut album New Long Leg is also notable for the expansive, dynamic guitar playing of Tom Dowse, who strikes and caresses his Gibson SG in equal measure.

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Ahead of his show in Dallas, Martin Barre talks about his aversion to most music https://micgillette.com/ahead-of-his-show-in-dallas-martin-barre-talks-about-his-aversion-to-most-music/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/ahead-of-his-show-in-dallas-martin-barre-talks-about-his-aversion-to-most-music/ Of the nearly 55 years that Jethro Tull has existed as a rock ‘n’ roll ambassador of English flute-based folk music, 45 of those years have been carried by the muscular guitar drumming of Martin Barre. With a breath of fresh air into his own career and the relationship with the band that made him […]]]>

Of the nearly 55 years that Jethro Tull has existed as a rock ‘n’ roll ambassador of English flute-based folk music, 45 of those years have been carried by the muscular guitar drumming of Martin Barre. With a breath of fresh air into his own career and the relationship with the band that made him famous, the former Jethro Tull guitarist is set to bring his solo band to Arlington Music Hall.

At 8 p.m. on Thursday, January 27, Barre et co. celebrate the 50th anniversary of Tull’s historic album Scuba diving suit featuring a special guest appearance from former Jethro Tull drummer Clive Bunker and a performance of the iconic album in its entirety as well as other Tull favorites and selections from Barre’s recent solo triumphs.

Barre and Jethro Tull parted ways in 2012, when Ian Anderson, the band’s jester-like flautist frontman, decided to reconfigure the band as a solo effort. Over the next decade, Barre focused on songwriting and composing, something he had little opportunity to do in Jethro Tull.

“There was no availability because Ian was so prolific,” Barre said on the phone before a show in snowy Michigan. “Now I have a lot of space to do that. I’m always up for the challenge and very determined to become a better songwriter, arranger and music producer. I always try to improve what I have, as opposed to everyone’s “conclusions.” Everyone draws “conclusions” about music and what’s right and wrong, but I prefer mine for better or worse.

Surprisingly, despite the varied styles he’s covered with and without Jethro Tull, Barre says his own appetite for outside music is rather specific.

“Ninety-nine percent of the music I hear I don’t like,” he says. “I don’t like other guitarists, I don’t like the saxophone. If there’s one music I love, it’s classical music. I’ve always liked that, that’s what I listen to for fun.

Barre has said in the past that he avoids listening to other guitarists to preserve his own style of playing.

“I’ve been listening to great players for 50 years, and I admire what they do, but I don’t relate to it,” he says, “I don’t hear a guitarist and I think ‘I wish I could do that’ ‘, because I’m happy with what I can do. I’m not interested. I’m just trying to be a better music writer. In terms of acting, I think I’ve found my niche and I have no intention of leaving soon.

Whether this method of “conservation” is more or less effective than others, Barre says each person should have their own methods.

“I think you’re coming to the same place,” he said. “You can learn guitar by taking lessons or watching YouTube videos or by doing it yourself, but you end up in the same place.”

That being said, the remaining 1% that Barre enjoys is somewhat surprising.

“I love virtuoso bluegrass,” he says. “The banjo and mandolin music is fabulous. Folk music too, Scottish and Irish folk music. A tiny bit of blues. But classical music gives me everything I want. It contains all these genres, you just have to find them.

Since fully committing to his solo work, Barre has released four albums over the past decade and has more material on the way, a creative explosion from someone whose first songwriting credit (the song 1975 title Minstrel in the gallery, a credit shared with Anderson) entered six years into his tenure with the band and whose first credited single track came three years later (“Quatrain” from Tull’s live album To burst).

“I’ve done it more in the last few years because I had the motivation to do it,” Barre says. “I love writing music as a beginner. There’s a lot of room for improvement. If I have any aspirations in my career, it’s to be a better music writer.

Barre says he has no qualms that his new found love for songwriting may be overshadowed by the towering legacy of his life’s work.

“I use one to feed the other,” he says. “If I play Jethro Tull’s music to 5,000 people and I can play four of my own songs, that’s great. I’m happy to do that. I have no pretensions about why I’m here and why my audience is here, but deep down my music will always be more important to me. It will always be there under the surface. Writing a song that everyone knows, or bringing in a band and saying, “We’re playing one of your songs on stage,” would be the best thing that could happen to me. The rest is bread and butter.

As to whether he feels like his recent burst of creativity may lead to artistic burnout, Barre says he’s confident that won’t happen soon.

“I haven’t found it harder yet, but I know a lot of people whose songwriting has deteriorated,” he laughs. “I just hope it doesn’t happen to me for a long time and when it does, I’ll stop writing. It’s very hard to be honest with yourself, and it’s very hard to let go of something you’ve done all your life, but I’m very critical of what I do. I hope it stays that way.”

Barre says the postponement of live performances for the past two years has given her a break and allowed her to recharge creatively.

“I had a great two years at home because I was writing music, playing a lot of guitar, playing the flute, kind of catching up with life,” he says. “It didn’t bother me – financially it was a pig, but mentally it was quite refreshing. It’s a good thing to do at my age, just stop and take stock of everything. I’m fine The band is back, the four of us played in Florida for a few weeks, and now we have the girls and Clive with us, so it’s really great.

“I don’t hear a guitar player and I think ‘I wish I could do that’, because I’m happy with what I can do.” – Martin Barre

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Barre’s current band includes vocalist/guitarist Dan Crisp, bassist Alan Thompson, drummer Darby Todd, and vocalists Alex Hart and Becca Langsford providing vocals and additional instrumental backing.

“I’m just trying to give the audience what they paid to come see and hear,” Barre says. “If someone said to me, ‘I really like the way you do Tull’s stuff, but I’m not sure about your stuff’, I wouldn’t mind the least bit. I have no expectations of the If for 10 people who say there’s one person who says they’d like to know more about me, then that’s a great balance.

Although the past decade has been Barre’s first as a solo performer and writer, it’s not the first time he’s made music outside of Jethro Tull. He played guitar on a number of records over the years, including notable turns on solo albums by Ten Years After keyboardist Chick Churchill in 1973 and King Crimson bassist (and then-future Asian singer) John Wetton in 1980.

“I like working with other people,” Barre says. “Especially people I know nothing about, because it puts you in a very open position where you have to work hard and find something that works for them rather than for yourself. I think musicians who don’t get involved not in a challenge like this miss what music is.

Luckily for Barre, this creative mission and a bit of snow in the Midwest seem to be her only challenges in life at the moment. He greatly appreciates the camaraderie of his new group, and life on the road is something he’s been used to all his life.

“I make my home wherever I am,” he says. “I’ve done this all my life. It’s not particularly ideal, but wherever I lay my head, I call home. It is part of the nomadic way of life. For 50 years, I got used to it. It gets a bit sad, but basically it works for me. I love my things – my guitars, my car, my garden, my collection of steam engines – but other than that, I don’t miss them at all. They mean next to nothing, which is a healthy contrast. Nothing should matter so much from a materialistic point of view, so I can live without them.

Despite her inner peace without material possessions, Barre appreciates the presence of a kettle on the road. “With real milk,” he laughs.

Barre says he’s learned to appreciate the little things in life at this point – the privacy, the company of his family and bandmates, and the ability to stop and smell the roses once in a while. on the road. Every day, he runs for an hour in the city where he is.

“You see things other people don’t see when they’re just sitting in a hotel room; it’s the last thing I want to do,” Barre said. “I want to walk around and see what a place is. Most of the places I’ve been to so I know them, but I’m interested in where I am.

The nature of life on the road taught Barre a lot about life.

“People always say, ‘You’ve traveled everywhere,’ but not really, I just worked in lots of different places,” Barre explains. “We’ve played in India before, but I can’t really say I’ve ‘been’ to India. I’ve only been to the Sheraton in Mumbai, and that’s not India. It’s just America in India So I’m not a real traveler, but I do my best with what I have.

“Either you fight your situation or you accept it and enjoy it. We stop for a nice homemade breakfast if we can find a family restaurant. These are the things that make life easier, and they become more important than they normally would.”

As Barre is called in for what is sure to be a chilling soundcheck, he ends the conversation on a high note.

“I’m just happy with what I have,” he says. “Music keeps me busy. It’s my life, it doesn’t own me, but I certainly own it.

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Dazzle celebrates 25 years of jazz https://micgillette.com/dazzle-celebrates-25-years-of-jazz/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 20:01:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/dazzle-celebrates-25-years-of-jazz/ Jazz is one of America’s quintessential creations – one that continues to influence and inspire, even for people who don’t consider themselves to be fans of the genre. Dazzle, Denver’s jazz nightclub, has been one of the key places to keep this art form on stage in Mile High City for the past quarter-century. And […]]]>

Jazz is one of America’s quintessential creations – one that continues to influence and inspire, even for people who don’t consider themselves to be fans of the genre. Dazzle, Denver’s jazz nightclub, has been one of the key places to keep this art form on stage in Mile High City for the past quarter-century. And it starts 2022 with a birthday party on several evenings, marking 25 years of operation.

“We’re dedicated to great music and people know that every time they come to Dazzle the music will be phenomenal,” said Kelley Dawkins, Marketing Manager at Dazzle, 1512 Curtis St. “With our menu, we’re a great way to have a fun and energetic night out without you having to put a lot of energy into it. And we’ve done a great job building a local audience that feeds the love of jazz.

The first performance of the anniversary celebration will be Convergence with Roberta Gambarini at 6.30 p.m. on January 7 and 8. Rico jones and Maximum light will be featured on the 9:30 p.m. show on January 7. The 9:30 p.m. performance on January 8 is called “Dazzle Mixtape” and will feature the 2018 Grammy nominated and violinist Sara caswell, saxophonist Anisha rush, trombonist Marc Patterson, pianist Jacquelyn Schreiber, bass player Gabe Rupe and drummer Colin Stranahan. The final show will take place at 6 p.m. on Sunday January 9 and is Patterson’s “Group Stories” with Dale Bruning and Caswell.

According to the information provided, Dazzle started in 1997 at 930 Lincoln St. before moving to its current location. Like every other concert venue, it struggled during the pandemic, but Dazzle went out of its way to make things a little easier for the musicians. This led them to participate in their Bread & Jam program, “a weekly VIP jam session where musicians can rekindle old musical relationships and find new ones.” They also get a hot meal out of the deal.

“We wanted to reconsider our place in the great Denver music community because we want everyone to win,” Dawkins said. “We do our best to support musicians in any way we can. “

Although jazz is not the most popular genre, it still arouses the passion of fans of all ages. And Dazzle wants to stay there for musicians to share their love of form.

“Traditional jazz often appeals to older audiences, and while there is always an audience for this music, it’s nice to see the different ways jazz evolves. There are so many blurry lines between genres, which means it’s very easy to switch from jazz to R&B and pop, ”Dawkins said. “Dazzle has always loved being the little club in the middle of Denver where you can hear amazing national and international performers and great local music. But now we’re heading to the place for the best local music, with occasional national and international artists stopping by. “

For tickets and information, visit dazzledenver.com.

Kiss the sky at Wings Over the Rockies

Wings over the Rockies presents a new exhibit for the 2022 kick-off – one that celebrates some of aerospace’s greatest achievements. To the sky: breakthroughs in Flight is on display at the museum, 7711 E. Academy Blvd. in Denver, which is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.

According to information provided, artifacts on display include fabric from the Wright Flyer that went to the moon with Neil Armstrong, an American flag signed by Charles Lindbergh, fabric from the Lockheed Vega that Amelia Earhart flew solo across the Atlantic and more. Visit WingsMuseum.org/Skyward for more information and tickets.

Factory Fashion celebrates drag culture

Factory mode kicks off the new year with a program to help teens reveal themselves. Slide preteen fashion starts on Sunday January 9 and lasts the rest of the month, with one-off sessions and a multi-week course that teaches attendees everything from wig maintenance to makeup and performance techniques. The series ends with a final performance at Stanley Market on Saturday January 30.

Part of the Aurora-based community art collective, Factory Five Five, Factory Fashion is located at the Stanley Marketplace, 2501 Dallas St., Suite 200, in Aurora. For more information and to register, visit factoryfivefive.com/fashion.

Clarke’s Concert of the Week – Charley Crockett at the Ogden Theater

Charley crockett is one of the most prolific and underrated musicians in music today, living in the nebulous space between blues and country music. His crooning style is straight out of classical country music, while his guitar playing is also indebted to blues legends. Last year he released “Music City USA”, not only its best but one of the best of the entire year.

Crockett will perform at Ogden Theater, 935 E. Colfax Ave. in Denver, at 9 p.m. on Saturday, Jan.8. Make sure you don’t miss it by purchasing tickets at axs.com.

Clarke Reader’s Culture Column appears weekly. He can be contacted at Clarke.Reader@hotmail.com.

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Chuck Berry, “Live From Blueberry Hill”: album review https://micgillette.com/chuck-berry-live-from-blueberry-hill-album-review/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 13:30:48 +0000 https://micgillette.com/chuck-berry-live-from-blueberry-hill-album-review/ Even in his prime, Chuck Berry in concert was somewhat of a cautious proposition to buyers. Pick-up bands, inconsistent performances, a sometimes brooding layout didn’t always guarantee that “rock and roll music” would be as good as it could and should be. Blueberry Hill was different, however. The St. Louis club was firm ground for […]]]>


Even in his prime, Chuck Berry in concert was somewhat of a cautious proposition to buyers. Pick-up bands, inconsistent performances, a sometimes brooding layout didn’t always guarantee that “rock and roll music” would be as good as it could and should be.

Blueberry Hill was different, however. The St. Louis club was firm ground for Berry, a hometown oasis much like Stone Pony was for Bruce Springsteen. It was a comfort zone where Berry had a good, trusted friend in Joe Edwards. It was Edwards who came up with the idea in 1996, the year Berry turned 70, to transform the basement of the bar and restaurant into the Duck Room, named after the famous rock pioneer duck walk. ‘n’roll and adorned with pictures of Berry.

Berry will perform over 200 shows in the Duck Hall – including his last show on October 15, 2014, two and a half years before his death at the age of 90. By all accounts (including Daniel Durchholz’s insightful liner notes) this was the best place to see Berry perform – especially with a regular group of local musicians, a quintet that included his son Charles Berry Jr. on guitar. and her daughter Ingrid Berry on vocals and harmonica.

The 11 songs on Live from Blueberry Hill, recorded between July 2004 and January 2006, ignited in a fierce 30 minutes, proof that Berry Sr. could still muster an age-defying fire under the right circumstances. Know how to enter Live from Blueberry Hill that this is not a showcase for Berry’s vocals, which had little range or tonality at this point – something that actually works to its advantage during the “Bio” oral memoir. But there’s still a lot of spice to their guitar playing, and the ensemble has the kind of immediacy and musculature you’d expect from a bar band in the best sense of the word, with pianist Robert Lohr contributing so much. hot solos than Berry himself.

The band merges “Carol” and “Little Queenie” into a playful medley, while “Let It Rock” and “Around and Around” are locomotives with that sound ready to jump the track anytime but never do. The slower blues of “Mean Old World” gives Ingrid Berry a welcome spotlight, while the classics – “Roll Over Beethoven”, “Sweet Little Sixteen”, “Johnny B. Goode” – are ragged celebrations but fair. “It’s my show. I have to get it out of the gutter,” Berry told the crowd at one point, but the truth is he doesn’t have to pull too hard. Live from Blueberry Hill shows that even in the late ’70s, and with his heyday well in the rearview mirror, Berry was still able to ring the bell when the spirit moved him.

Top 100 classic rock artists

Click to see how they rank, as we count the top 100 classic rock artists.


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Top 18 Songs Fret Zealot Users Learned To Play Guitar In 2021 https://micgillette.com/top-18-songs-fret-zealot-users-learned-to-play-guitar-in-2021/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/top-18-songs-fret-zealot-users-learned-to-play-guitar-in-2021/ This article is sponsored by Fret Zealot Even if you are just beginning your guitar playing adventure with Fret Zealot, millions of players around the world have already taken advantage of the robust learning platform and all that it entails. With another year almost behind us, Fret Zealot looks back on the top artists, songs, […]]]>


This article is sponsored by Fret Zealot



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Even if you are just beginning your guitar playing adventure with Fret Zealot, millions of players around the world have already taken advantage of the robust learning platform and all that it entails. With another year almost behind us, Fret Zealot looks back on the top artists, songs, and courses gamers enjoyed the most in 2021.

Top 8 Fret Zealot artists in 2021



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Considering that Fret Zealot is all about learning how to master the guitar, it’s no wonder 2021’s most popular artists are rock and roll royalty. From the recognizable styles of Angus Young to the menacing sweeps of Zak Wylde, here are Fret Zealot’s most popular artists over the past year:

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  1. AC DC
  2. Metallica
  3. Led Zeppelin
  4. Guns N ‘Roses
  5. Aerosmith
  6. Black sabbath
  7. Lynyrd skynyrd
  8. Santana

Top 18 Fret Zealot songs in 2021



Back in black

The above artists are known for many hits throughout their careers, but these are a handful of songs that Fret Zealot users liked or recorded the most. These are the 18 most popular songs of the last year. Good luck that none of them get stuck in your head.

  1. Back in Black – AC / DC
  2. Stairway to Heaven – Led Zeppelin
  3. Thunderclap – AC / DC
  4. Highway to Hell – AC / DC
  5. Hotel California – Eagles
  6. Nothing Else Matters – Metallica
  7. Hells Bells – AC / DC
  8. I wish you were there – Pink Floyd
  9. Sweet Home Alabama – Lynyrd Skynyrd
  10. Between Sandman – Metallica
  11. Smells Like Teen Spirit – Nirvana
  12. Dream On – Aerosmith
  13. Simple Man – Lynyrd Skynyrd
  14. Californication – Red Hot Chili Peppers
  15. Wanted Dead or Alive – Bon Jovi
  16. One – Metallica
  17. Sweet Child O ‘Mine – Guns N’ Roses
  18. Come as you are – Nirvana


Fret Zealot’s 10 Best Video Lessons of 2021



Sweet Home Alabama - LED

Some players can choose new songs by reading the tablature quite easily. Others may get a huge boost from Fret Zealot’s video tutorial library. These are the 10 best video courses that users watched in 2021.

  1. Back in Black – AC / DC
  2. Hotel California – Eagles
  3. Sweet Child O ‘Mine – Guns N’ Roses
  4. Sweet Home Alabama – Lynyrd Skynyrd
  5. Hells Bells – AC / DC
  6. Thunderclap – AC / DC
  7. Tennessee Whiskey – Chris Stapleton
  8. Shallow (from A Star Is Born) – Lady Gaga, Bradley Cooper
  9. Highway to Hell – AC / DC
  10. You rocked me all night – AC / DC

Other interesting Fret Zealot stats from 2021



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In addition to researching artists and learning songs, Fret Zealot offers a robust educational platform that teaches players how to master the basics of the guitar. In 2021, Fret Zealot’s most popular online course was the 30-Day Beginner Challenge.


Overall, players spent an average of 11 minutes and 50 seconds on each course. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the most popular days of the week for learning were Saturdays and Sundays. The most active users were based in the United States, followed by the United Kingdom, then France, Canada and Germany. Finally, the most popular lighting effects for the Fret Zealot guitar system were Rainbow, Bolt, and Sparkler.

Start now with Fret Zealot



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Ready to join the millions of Fret Zealot users who already have mastered the guitar in a way conventional lessons can’t? Prepare for success by saving $ 20 on a Fret Zealot LED Lighting System or Guitar Combo Pack when you use the promo code ANDROID at the register.

Bonus: Not only will the Fret Zealot LED system help you understand your instrument interactively, it will also turn your guitar into an impromptu Christmas tree. Happy Holidays!




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I played with Qualcomm’s Switch type G3x game console and wish I could buy it

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Sound & View: Bronwyn Rose https://micgillette.com/sound-view-bronwyn-rose/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 10:06:06 +0000 https://micgillette.com/sound-view-bronwyn-rose/ Bronwyn Rose Boyer: weaver of dreams Amid the magical mosaic of writers, painters, musicians, producers and storytellers who work and reside in the Huntsville area, some rare gems are often less known to the general public. One of those rare gems of incredible beauty is Bronwyn Rose Boyer, who simply plays and records as Bronwyn […]]]>


Bronwyn Rose Boyer: weaver of dreams

Amid the magical mosaic of writers, painters, musicians, producers and storytellers who work and reside in the Huntsville area, some rare gems are often less known to the general public. One of those rare gems of incredible beauty is Bronwyn Rose Boyer, who simply plays and records as Bronwyn Rose.

She is a gifted musician with advanced abilities on a complex range of instruments such as violin, piano, drums, percussion and most notably guitar – an instrument she has almost exclusively reinvented for her own creative purposes. . Bronwyn is also an innovative and exciting songwriter, arranger and record producer and singer with an amazing mastery of melodic and harmonious vocals.

With two recorded works released over the past six years, Exit in 2015 and Momentum In 2018, Bronwyn was in deep production mode for the release of her third album in the Evolution trilogy, when she was faced with a serious, life-changing illness. Lucky for all of us, Bronwyn has successfully overcome most of the ill effects of her illness and is soon preparing to return to finally record the final album in the trilogy, Acceleration.

Bronwyn generally remained on her own during her creative years in Huntsville, developing her projects or supporting herself as a set decorator in the busy world of television production in Toronto. With the exception of a few rare but delicious concerts, or the participation of other musicians in local fundraising efforts, Bronwyn’s music and performances are confined to her YouTube channel and her recordings. Besides her own musical creations, Bronwyn is also a record producer for artists such as Patty Crozier and others.

Bronwyn is also a unique and talented painter and designer, using her pieces for the album cover and painting for friends and family.

His aspirations for artistic life, his inspirations and his dynamism appeared remarkably early in his childhood. Growing up on an 85 acre farm outside of Bracebridge as the only child of the astonishing songwriter, musician and writer, Alison Boyer, Bronwyn lived in what must surely be considered an enchanted kingdom. Alison is a prodigious songwriter in her own right and an extraordinarily talented musician on master class guitar, piano and chromatic harmonica, considered by many to be the best local instrument.

Bronwyn Rose Boyer (submitted)

At six, Bronwyn saw a violinist on Sesame Street and began asking her mother how to play. Trained with a local teacher, Bronwyn built a solid foundation in music theory through classical and conservatory violin training, in which she excelled. At the age of fourteen, Bronwyn began learning to play the drums on a vintage ensemble that her mother kept for her own recordings. She quickly formed a rock trio called Slight Return with two of her best friends. Through the fun and camaraderie she felt with her band, Bronwyn began to explore other instruments, revolving around the piano and her early attempts at songwriting.

Guitar became a fascination for her around this same time, but she had to learn to play on her mother’s left-handed guitar, forcing her to create her own approach to hand positions and chord structures. She imaginatively developed a unique form of guitar playing, utilizing vocals, tunings, and hand movements that can only be attributed to her own innate musical genius.

Unlike so many other young guitarists who rote, learn chords and scales, Bronwyn discovered a fundamentally self-conceived musical language in standard orchestral tuning, a feat attempted only by a few notable exceptions in the arts. musical – Joni Mitchell, Michael Hedges, David Crosby, Django Reinhardt, all virtuoso guitarists to say the least.

Not to diminish his other musical talents, it is this ability to play the guitar with such unfettered freedom that makes Bronwyn an astounding rarity among guitarists, many of whom have been featured on “Sound and Sight”. in Doppler. It is also the underlying gift that stimulates his prodigious and prolific writing. Never fixing for long, Bronwyn is constantly on the lookout for new avenues of expression – new colors, new tempos, soundscapes – largely coming from his inventive and artfully ingenious guitar sound. As a young artist, she amassed a vast portfolio of adventurous songs, perhaps too many to even record and produce properly.

In her early 20s, Bronwyn sought out and met her father, Imre de Jonge, sparking a collaboration that continues until this writing. Imre is a formidable talent: a world famous drummer, guitarist, keyboardist, bassist, producer and luthier-guitarist who makes unique and beautiful handcrafted instruments. Imre seems almost capable of learning any skill required of a modern musician. He is the owner / operator of ‘The Barn’, a recording studio in Huntsville which he founded in 2000 and where Bronwyn now lives and records. The studio offers recordings for a large collection of aspiring songwriters from the region – Lewis and Clarke, Juan Barbosa, Patty Crozier and more.

The collaboration between Imre and Bronwyn produced stellar work. Imre’s rich tapestry of talent enables Bronwyn to perform an exciting variety of sounds to complement his songwriting art. Many of his recordings actually include his mother Alison and his father Imre providing the rich complexity around his tracks.

Perhaps Bronwyn’s most remarkable abilities are his ingenious vocal and harmonious arrangements. Almost death-defying choirs soar and swirl in refracted prism-like frequencies that sparkle celestial sunlight pouring through the cathedral halls and windows, shining and uplifting.

We all have to recognize that Huntsville is a diamond mine of precious artistic talent. Bronwyn Rose Boyer stands out among many others, not only for her multi-faceted bent, but also for her beautifully substantial artistic contribution, filled with genius, passion and love. Wealth beyond wealth, a treasure more precious than that of the Magi.

Learn and listen more about bronwynboyer.bandcamp.com, on Facebook here, or at Bronwyn Youtube channel.

Writer’s Note: I wish you dear readers the best of the season and the happiest memories with your friends and family over Christmas time and the birth of a new year. ~ DMc

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Jerry Cantrell talks about new solo album, opening Great White https://micgillette.com/jerry-cantrell-talks-about-new-solo-album-opening-great-white/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 12:10:28 +0000 https://micgillette.com/jerry-cantrell-talks-about-new-solo-album-opening-great-white/ “Demonstrating and collecting ideas is like money in the bank,” says Alice in Chains guitarist Jerry Cantrell of songs from his new solo album, Enlighten, released October 29. “There are all kinds of great ideas that never get used or taken care of, or that don’t match the time or recording you’re working on. And […]]]>


“Demonstrating and collecting ideas is like money in the bank,” says Alice in Chains guitarist Jerry Cantrell of songs from his new solo album, Enlighten, released October 29. “There are all kinds of great ideas that never get used or taken care of, or that don’t match the time or recording you’re working on. And the cool thing is they’re still there.

Cantrell has done everything to Enlighten, his first solo album since 2002 Journey of degradation. He co-produced the LP with film score composer and former Marilyn Manson guitarist Tyler Bates, and he enlisted a cast of star musicians including Guns N ‘Roses bassist Duff McKagan, Paul McCartney drummer Abe Laboriel Jr. and Dillinger Escape Plan singer Greg Puciato.

The resulting nine-song project features the melancholy vocal harmonies and multi-layered guitars that have become the hallmark of Alice in Chains. Corn Enlighten also trades austere, muted alt metal for bucolic folk tunes and swaggering country-rock, dotted with steel pedal guitars and smoky Hammond organ flourishes. A nod to his classic rock roots, Cantrell closes the album with a haunting cover of Elton John’s “Goodbye”, which earned him the Rocket Man seal of approval.

Shortly after the release of Enlighten, Cantrell spoke to UCR about the songwriting process, his guitar playing philosophy, and opening up glam bands at the start of Alice in Chains.

It’s an album that really lends itself to repeated listening. It has so many instrumental and melodic layers.
I grew up with a lot of records like this, and I tried to make records like that. I think a lot of our music and the music I’ve been in, we’ve had songs and instant records, like “hell yeah” but they’re really built for the long haul. And I appreciate that. I like that you get 10+ plays and 20 plays and 30 plays. Like, “Holy shit, is he doing that over there?” What is he doing here? I like this depth. I love the layering. I like the story, you know? And it goes from the surface to the bottom.

You pioneered Seattle sound in the 90s, but when I listen to this record I have a much more Californian feel to it. There are country elements; he has a slide guitar; there are sunny and catchy melodies. Were you aware of this dynamic when you were making this album?
When you start a record, for me part of the fun is not knowing where you are going. You can have a handful of ideas that give you a little idea of ​​what it might be like, just by demonstrating songs like, “Okay, it’s gonna be a heavy record” or “It’s gonna be a little more. of an atmospheric and lighter disc. But you sort of come up with that in the process, and it’s a nice surprise. You just go where you feel the music naturally takes you. So it’s interesting because in this demo process I’m just demonstrating what strikes me and going through a writing process. And there were about nine or 10 tracks that were basically the body of this album, and then there were about five or six other songs that felt like a different album, felt a little more up front, aggressive and cursed, and they didn’t seem to match that. And you sort of realize this process halfway through the demo and [say], “Okay, I guess that’s where we’re going.” You listen to where it takes you, and then you just try to guide it and let it be a natural thing, in the moment.

Watch the video for Jerry Cantrell’s “Atone”

I guess that’s a good problem: having too much good material to fit on one disc, rather than scrambling to find enough songs.
It’s a problem that luckily I haven’t had in my career, trying to find enough music to fill a record. And I’m grateful for that, and I attribute that to a lot of hard work, and also being part of a collective that drives that. We made recordings – Pot of flies being an example – where we didn’t have much when we walked in, and we kind of made it up, and it turned out to be a really good album. But for the most part, I like going there, and you like going there as a band or as a writer, knowing that you already have a lot of material that you feel good with.

You have an impressive cast of musicians on this album, including Duff McKagan on bass. Do you have a strong musical relationship because of your common roots in Seattle?
We do, and Duff has asked me repeatedly to join him on some of his efforts, some of his solo records. And we did a cool thing where we played a song for Jimmy Carter’s birthday. He joined us on tour, as we headed towards directing [Alice in Chains’] Black gives way to blue, went out on the road with us and played guitar with us. And we are good friends and longtime collaborators. I don’t think he intended to do the whole record, but he came to do a song or two, [and] I kept throwing tunes at him, and after a few days he had already done three-quarters of the record. [Laughs.] He’s so talented. I just admire him as a musician and as a man.

Of all the archetypal grunge bands that came out in the early ’90s, I feel like Alice in Chains had the biggest soft spot for’ 80s hard rock from Los Angeles. You’ve been able to inject those big riffs and that sense of spectacle into your sound.
Yeah, I mean [there] a lot of good music has been made during this decade. And being a big band and being able to command a stage and have a big audience and put on a show are just as crucial as writing good songs and being a good musician. At first, maybe a lot of our brothers didn’t openly admit it, but we all listened to the same thing and were inspired by everything from the most underground punk to the biggest and most commercial rock and everything in between. But we just wanted to get on stage, and we wanted to be a successful band, and we wanted to be a great band. There was [Mother] Love Bone, then later Pearl Jam and Soundgarden and Us and the [Screaming] Trees and Mudhoney and Nirvana. Four of them were all in the same office, weren’t they? So every once in a while someone would come into town, like Poison or Helix or whatever. I think our first gig, we were opening act for Great White and Tesla. They would call and ask if any of the groups would be interested in opening for these groups, and everyone refused except us. We’re like, “Is this a scene? Is it in our state or in our city? We’re there. We’ll play with anyone.” And they were important representatives, going on big stages, no matter if you didn’t mix very well musically with the band you were playing with. We did concerts or toured with everyone. We shot with Extreme. We toured with Slayer. We toured with Iggy Pop. We toured with Van Halen. Diversity is a good thing. We’ve always embraced that, and it’s more fun I think when you get a variety of things that [when] it’s just a pure hard metal show.

I imagine when you fight for your life to conquer an audience that is not yours, it makes you appreciate the audience that is only there for you even more.
When you start to be able to open up for bands of this size, playing in arenas and bigger venues like festival crowds and stuff like that, it’s a big leap. It’s a big leap from a crappy little club you’re used to playing. But you also have the experience of having been through that and seeing the change when your music starts to catch on and people start to pay attention to you. So that’s what happened for us in the middle of Clash of the Titans, as we opened for Anthrax, Megadeth, and Slayer on a headlining tour. For the first half of that, it was like running the glove. You were constantly dodging the shit thrown at you. People would spit, curse at you, swing at you, jump on stage and start fighting with you. And we kind of enjoyed that. It was a bit like us against the world. But about halfway through, “Man in the Box” aired on radio and began airing on MTV. And it was strange because you could almost immediately feel this change.

Listen to “Black Hearts and Evil Done” by Jerry Cantrell

Gibson recently unveiled your signature “Wino” Les Paul. When you were developing your talents as a guitarist and songwriter, what was your philosophy and approach to the guitar?
It’s a lot of listening, a lot of time spent playing. One thing I did a lot was when I was going out alone, away from home or whatever, around 18, 19, it was live shows. And I’ve imbibed a lot of that, and it kind of comes back to what we were talking about. It’s about a lot of different skill levels, rather than just being a great musician. And I think you are going through a process of discovering yourself. I’ve always been in bands that had riffs, and I’ve always dug bands that had really strong writers, and I guess I naturally turned to that and found myself somewhere along that path. Riffs, songs, melody, harmony. These are the four keys right there.

Some guitarists just treat a song as a vehicle to access the solo so they can show off. I don’t think you’ve ever had this inclination.
Well I’m not very good at where I can just improvise for a 15 minute solo so I have to lean on other strengths. My stuff has always been really song-specific, even some of the previous stuff where there’s always space for the guitar solo. And I love it, believe me, but even these solos, I still think about it [as] it must add something to the song, and I always think of it as another section. And it must speak. He must sing like a line of voice or horn. Something unique and uplifts the song, but it’s still something memorable and melodic. And particularly [outside of the] In the United States, like in South America or a lot of European countries, it’s a journey not only for people to sing your song lyrics, but they’ll sing your solos to you as well. It makes you cold in the back.

You have tour dates in 2022. Do you know who will be playing in the band at the moment?
I think there are some of the guys I made the album with who are going to travel with me. A lot of them have their own stuff going on, their own big bands and their own plans to do, but that’s a little far from saying who will actually be there. But I’ll go with the flow. I’ve been really lucky to be able to put together a cool new group of musicians and go out and tour every time I did, so I don’t worry about that this time around.

Top 30 grunge albums

From Nirvana and Neil Young to Melvins and Mudhoney – the best works of the 90s movement.


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Henry Parker: Lammas Fair (Album Review) https://micgillette.com/henry-parker-lammas-fair-album-review/ https://micgillette.com/henry-parker-lammas-fair-album-review/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 09:13:05 +0000 https://micgillette.com/henry-parker-lammas-fair-album-review/ Henry Parker: Lammas Fair Cup & Ring – November 5, 2021 There is a lush folk-rock sound from the first bars of Henri parker‘s Lammas fair – splashes of cymbals and an evocative guitar that makes the difference between Richard Thompson and the Byrds. But while the sounds betray a certain nostalgia for the golden […]]]>

Henry Parker: Lammas Fair

Cup & Ring – November 5, 2021

There is a lush folk-rock sound from the first bars of Henri parker‘s Lammas fair – splashes of cymbals and an evocative guitar that makes the difference between Richard Thompson and the Byrds. But while the sounds betray a certain nostalgia for the golden age of the late 60s, the songwriting is all Parker own. Its main concern is the sense of belonging, and it is succinct and descriptive in equal measure. The album’s opening line – “The Wind Blows Through the Hanging Stone” shows just how skillful he is at directing. It places the listener in the middle of a particular landscape from the start. Yet it also conveys the mystery of this landscape (the hanging stone, near Parker’s house in Yorkshire, is erratic glaciation, a geological feature that both belongs and does not).

While songwriters of previous generations have often used the folk idiom to explore strange and beautiful landscapes, contemporary artists are, by necessity, more aware of how these landscapes are altered or erased by human actions. Parker is at the forefront of this ecologically conscious cowardly movement. The title track from her previous album, Silent Spring 2019, is a tribute to Rachel Carson’s influential book of the same name on environmental damage from synthetic pesticides. Lammas Fair’s songs are more abstract in their approach, but each celebrates, in its own way, a facet of Parker’s relationship with nature. Return To The Sky resembles the beginning of the Incredible String Band, employing a sort of clean poetry and atmospheric melody with oriental accents to return to the themes of Silent Spring: “Winter has never come / And summer has cried for the rain / But the seas rise faster by the year. ‘

Traveling For A Living intelligently compares the plight of the itinerant workers of the past and the immigrant workforce of today. Parker is never afraid to shy away from difficult and emotional questions, describing the way we treat certain minority groups as “a national disgrace”. His approach to the present and the past is unbiased and devoid of romance, yet he’s still able to coax the hazy beauty of ancient rituals and the movement of the seasons.

This hazy beauty is echoed in the music – the aforementioned muted cymbals (from drummer Louis Berthoud), the light touches of Fender Rhodes on Fools Gold (Theo Travis) and the sumptuous guitar playing of Parker who, on acoustic tracks like the magnificent instrumental Blackthorn, recalls John Renbourn or Martin Carthy (with whom he shares a penchant for unusual and distinctive tunings) as well as contemporaries like Toby Hay.

Equally alluring are his forays into traditional material – Death And The Lady and The Brisk Lad. The first, supported by Richard Curran’s violin and cello, is a haunting interpretation, while the second is dark folk-rock crossed by dark bands of percussion and culminating in a tonic wave of electric guitar. It provides a particularly effective introduction to the deceptively simple closing track, Coming Of The Spring, which adds an electronic bow and bow cymbal (techniques generally more comfortable in free improvisation) to the interaction. already powerful acoustic and electric guitars.

Another highlight is Nine Herbs Charm, which is like a pagan and eco-responsible alternative to putting lime in coconut and is augmented by Theo Travis’ flute, which is not far removed from the work of Harold McNair with Donovan. Travis takes to the piano to apply minimal touches to the slowness of Given Time, an invitation to step back from the hustle and bustle of modern life and, in particular, the alienating aspects of technology. It’s a message that sums up Lammas Fair, an album full of ancient wisdom and new beginnings, deeply rooted in the rugged landscape of northern England but ultimately outward looking and welcoming.

Lammas Fair is released 5e November 2021 on Cup and Ring.

Pre-order it today (digital / CD / vinyl – including limited edition vinyl): https://henryparker.bandcamp.com/album/lammas-fair

Learn more about Henry Parker:

Website: https://henryparkermusic.co.uk/

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Top 10 successful headbanging groups with a Christian message https://micgillette.com/top-10-successful-headbanging-groups-with-a-christian-message/ https://micgillette.com/top-10-successful-headbanging-groups-with-a-christian-message/#respond Wed, 27 Oct 2021 16:10:57 +0000 https://micgillette.com/top-10-successful-headbanging-groups-with-a-christian-message/ For this list, a group must have several Christian members, and many of their words must be inspired by faith. The group must also have started and remain Christian. This keeps Megadeth and WASP from entering as well as many groups who later gave up their faith. Groups with members of different faiths such as […]]]>


For this list, a group must have several Christian members, and many of their words must be inspired by faith. The group must also have started and remain Christian. This keeps Megadeth and WASP from entering as well as many groups who later gave up their faith. Groups with members of different faiths such as Christianity and Judaism are also absent as this can make the lyrics more difficult to distinguish, according to several sources the incredible Link in Park fits this description. In addition, groups that had albums without gospel messages contrary to Scripture came out. This means no Black Sabbath and almost eliminates Stryper for their album “Against The Law”. The groups listed should also have some success or impact. I mean they found Noah’s Ark where the Bible says it would also according to non-Christian sources, but if people don’t know it doesn’t do them any good.

10. Credo-

They legitimately had good songs. My Own Prison is a good album. In terms of sales success, they top everyone else on this list. I’ll also point out that Scott Stapp didn’t know he had bipolar disorder when he had an accident that led to his addiction to pain relievers. It definitely hurt their music. It’s also a shame that they didn’t let one of the greatest guitarists of their generation to shreds. They had a lot more talent than their discography produced.

9. Imari tones-

Christianity is not huge in Japan. That hasn’t stopped Tak and Company from releasing a respectable amount of albums in the Land of the Rising Sun. They have a wide range of musical prowess, being able to perform in many different styles. In many songs they also add pieces in English. They are fun to listen to and seem to be having fun making music. Plus, frontman Tak is a ridiculously underrated guitarist.

8. Impellitteri-

Chris Impellitteri is the fastest guitarist on this list. He is also the most decorated axman here. In fact, it is considered the second fastest crusher in the world! The group also had several different lead singers. The most notable of these are Rob Rock and Graham Bonnet. Impellitteri uses elements of rock, blues, classical and speed metal in a power metal performance as the main style. While Impellitteri hasn’t erupted in their home country, the United States, they are huge on the outside, especially in Japan. With over 2 million albums sold, mostly to people who don’t even speak English, you have to consider them.

7. Guard sheet-

Unfortunately, the group would become little more than a wonder. The self-titled debut album sold over a million in the United States. Their single “All Around Me” from the same record went Platinum and was one of the first 40 hits. “I’m So Sick” and “Fully Alive” were viral on YouTube and were huge on rock radio, but that was it. This launched the career of Lacey Sturm who has worked with POD, Breaking Benjamin and Skillet. The amount of talent that this band had overall was at its peak, but after an incredible album they faded from the limelight.

6. Paramore-

They have the gold and platinum records to show it. The same goes for singles. Lots of success online too. Hayley Williams is one of the most recognizable women in rock / punk. They quickly became superstars and one of the biggest names in “emo metal”. Paramore has their work certified on three different continents, which means they have global appeal. Lots of people would also claim that their music is the one good thing the Twilight movie franchise has ever released to the world.

5. Red-

Shortly after starting their career, Red was nominated for 2 Grammy Awards in Christian categories. They also started their career with 2 RIAA Gold certified singles from their first RIAA Gold album “End of Silence”. They seemed to be one of the new big emerging nu-metal bands, but after their debut the band quickly faded away. They had 2 top 10 Billboard Hot 200 albums, but nothing came up after their initial surge. This group, like their singer, can border on opera, soft and heartwarming, deep or heavy. There’s no denying their talent, but that hasn’t stopped their spotlight from going out. In the end, they still sold over 3 million albums.

4. Evanescence-

The one Grammy-winning act here has also sold over 25 million units. “My Immortal” and “Bring Me To Life” became classics of the 2000s. Their first major album sold over 17 million copies and won 2 Grammys out of 7 nominations. Amy Lee has become one of the best singers in the world almost overnight. After more than a decade and a half, they’re still relevant today, even though they’re a far cry from the sales force they once were. Still respected by just about everyone in the business, this group of Christians in a group are still amazing people. Whether in the studio or in concert, they are always worth hearing. Recognized, respected and appreciated around the world, Evanescence is still relevant to this day. They are also some of the best dogs in symphonic metal and nu-metal to date.

3. POD-

Sonny Sandoval is criminally underrated as a singer. He can rap softly or loudly, appease the audience with his reggae, or use soft vocals for a nice effect. Oh yeah, he also has some of the most emotionally brutal screams in my metal. From “Beautiful” to “Alive” to “Southtown,” it has a wild lineup that few rappers can match. Traa Daniels had some of the best bass riffs in nu-metal and Marcus Curiel could be heavy to artistic in his guitar playing. Sonny’s cousin, Wuv Bernando, also did a great job as a drummer. The vocals, guitar work, basslines, and percussion all hit hard and beautifully. Together they have grown into one of the biggest and arguably most respected rap-metal groups. 3 Grammy nominations, 2 hit albums and 12 million albums sold worldwide make it an incredible round. “Youth of the Nation” became their biggest hit and part of pop culture. Their music has also been in films such as Here Comes The Boom and The Matrix Trilogy. This group helped define a generation.

2. Stove-

Few groups, in general, have been so important over the past three decades. “Monster” alone is triple platinum in the US and has over 3 billion (yes with ab) audio plays worldwide. It is one of the most famous songs on the planet. They have sold over 10 million singles on their own. Their albums have also sold over 12 million units. “Collide” and “Comatose” both received Grammy Award nominations. Skillet has become the go-to band for sports themes and anthems with their music used by everyone from WWE to NFL, NBA, NCAA sports and more. Their ironic and at times downright daring Christian messages have spread to countless people and created one of rock’s greatest fan bases, lovingly known as “Panheads”. John Cooper boasts some of the best-known bass riffs of the 2010s and his rough, raw voice can mellow for the emotional parts, while also showcasing his power. When he sings from God’s point of view in “Whispers in the Dark” and “The Last Night” it really makes sense. Jen Ledger is one of the best drummers of the past decade, and her backing vocals add a whole new dimension. Lorry Cooper has a great chemistry with John (maybe because they’re married ??). On guitar, Seth Morrison is an underrated shredder with great variety, and before him was underground guitarist Ben Kasica. Skillet can go from pop to metal in the blink of an eye. Don’t underestimate them.

  1. Stringer-

Imagine running a secular late-night show like MTV, despite being overtly Christian. No need, as Stryper did in the 1980s. Four # 1 music videos on MTV and the most requested band on Dial MTV in 1987, they brought Christian metal to mainstream audiences for the first time. They also played a huge role in spreading power metal to Asia, especially Japan and South Korea. To Hell With The Devil and In God We Trust have sold millions of albums worldwide. The band itself has sold 12 million copies and their success arguably paved the way for a Grammy for Christian rock and rap groups. Ironically, they were never nominated for it (nor POD), but went on to have a Grammy nomination. They have also won several GMA Dove Awards (the Christian equivalent of a Grammy) and are helping turn Christian music into a multi-billion dollar industry. Since their rebirth in 2005, especially after 2009, they have been one of the most consistent metal bands of the ’80s. Michael Sweet’s voice improves with age and he is still one of the best howlers. of the history of music. Michael and Oz Fox have also had many great solos, both solo and duet. Robert Sweet was one of the first drummers to turn his set and face the stage left or right, so the crowd sees him play. He used strings and sometimes hung up 21 cymbals during live performances. Perry Richardson, Brad Cobb, Tracy Ferris and of course Tim Gaines have always been great on bass. They were a game-changer for power ballads, hair metal, power metal and Christian music.

Article By: John Ward


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