Pamplin Media Group – Woodstock Community Center reopens with variety of programs

With pandemic rules easing somewhat, this popular community center is once again open to the public in Woodstock

The Woodstock Community Center is open again and bursting with energy and new classes and opportunities for all ages.

Since last December, its new administrator is Gail Budde, who knows Portland Parks & Recreation and the Woodstock district well. In the 1990s and at the start of this century, she was recreation coordinator at the Fulton Community Center, then coordinator of the Citywide Dance Program. Her family lived in Woodstock until 2013, participating in numerous team sports and ballet. She says they still call the area home.

Her bachelor’s degree in recreation and parks led her to work as a recreation therapist after college. Later, she engaged in homeless outreach, taught preschool, ran summer camps, helped coordinate homeschool co-ops, and worked on event coordination. for a youth theater group.

As for the programs that have restarted at the Woodstock Community Center, Budde tells THE BEE that there will be a full summer of week-long camps for 3- to 5-year-olds at the WCC. The first four camps have all been filled – All That Glitters, Rainbow Days, Space Adventures and Outdoor Explorers. But, a second set of four camps – Under the Sea, Things that Go, Silly Science and Down on the Farm – just opened for registration on June 27.

The ever-popular Woodstock Taekwondo classes, with highly trained instructors experienced in working with youth and adults, began in late June and will run through the end of September. Ages 6 and up can join a beginner class for five Fridays, 6-7 p.m., for $28. For the more experienced, classes will take place on Thursdays from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. for $35. For more details go online – www.woodstocktaekwondo.com

Yoga and fitness classes will take place on Wednesday afternoons, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:45 p.m.

Half hour sessions of “Messy Art” – including shaving cream paint and slime (!) for ages 18 months to 4 years old will be offered on Tuesday mornings by Gail Budde – this is for adults and the children together. Budde says this class features “a lot of creative projects that little people love.”

Fall classes are still being decided. “We are currently talking with teachers about class proposals for the fall. If anyone in the neighborhood has a class they would like to teach or knows an outstanding teacher, we would love to hear from them!” said Budde. Guitar, Capoeira (a Brazilian fusion of martial arts and dance), more fitness classes, dance for kids, and visual arts are all possibilities.

In May and June, a few community groups used the building, including Urban Forestry, cleaning volunteers from Key Bank WCC and partner organization PP&R BIPOC. A music recital is on the program and the great hall is reserved on Wednesdays for meetings of the Woodstock Neighborhood Association.

“We would like to see the building used by the community as much as possible. If anyone is interested in renting the building or using it for community groups, they should reach out. It may be possible to accommodate rentals from the Monday to Saturday during the day and in the evening,” notes Budde.

The WCC has a spacious “mirror room” which can be used for off-site retreats or for staff training for companies or organizations. The North Room and the Classroom, combined, create space for a party, family reunion, or medium-sized event. The current standard rate for a private hire is $25 per hour, or variable, depending on the staff.

The Fall Pre-K preschool program (4-5 years) is already full. The Tuesday / Thursday course for 3 year olds still had a place in mid-June.

For a full description of classes and events at the Woodstock Community Center, see the PP&R Catalog that is mailed to residents of the city, or go online – www.portland.gov/parks


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