ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

ON THIS DAY IN 1925the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The Commissioner of Police [Richard] Last night, Enright announced the creation at Manhattan Police Headquarters of a new Crime Bureau to perform forensic analysis of all evidence. The Bureau will benefit from the City’s laboratory and the services of specialists in pathology, toxicology, chemistry, ballistics, criminology and chirography. Captain John A. Golden, Commanding Officer of the Identification Bureau, will be in charge. Fingerprints, bloodstains, and identification marks on clothing, furniture, and household items will be examined by Bureau staff, rather than precinct detectives. Commissioner Enright said he planned the Bureau after his trip to Europe and his study of policing methods in 1923. “We have now placed ourselves on a scientific level equal if not superior to any police force,” he said. he declares. “The result of the work of this Office is tied to a reduction in the number of unsolved murder cases and a much-desired increase in the number of homicide convictions. It will also solve many other mysteries.

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ON THIS DAY IN 1934the Eagle reported: “The tomb of King Tut, who according to Egyptian legend and tradition casts a spell of bad luck on all who violate his sacred precincts, will bring bad luck to hundreds, if not thousands, this winter if any credence can be placed in the age-old superstition… It is so because virtually everyone who has signified their intention to cruise to the Mediterranean and the Holy Land this winter aboard Samaria (Cunard White Star) has signed up for the special overland journey to be made to the ancient Pharaoh’s resting place… Besides this tomb, those daring ones will also enter the great temple of Karnak, the valley of the tombs of kings and queens and Luxor.

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ON THIS DAY IN 1942the Eagle reported: “Thomas E. Dewey, Republican gubernatorial candidate, yesterday praised the women of New York for their role in the war effort and, predicting the election of the GOP ticket, promised them a bigger role prominent in Albany state government. “In the administration that takes office on January 1,” he said at a women’s reception at the Hotel Pennsylvania in Manhattan, “I expect women to play a more important than ever in the history of New York State.” The candidate’s speech came late in the day after a campaign tour of Staten Island, where he omitted a fixed address and limited his activities to greeting party leaders and campaign supporters.

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953the Eagle reported, “Another drop in the inflationary wind that is sending college tuition skyrocketing is the announcement by Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn., that it will raise its annual tuition by $600 $ to $650. This announcement followed similar ones by other college education centers. Dr. Victor L. Butterfield, Wesleyan President, explained that rising costs have necessitated increases for most independent colleges over the past five years. He pointed out that since 1941, annual Wesleyan expenditure per student has doubled – from $1,000 to $2,200 – while the cost to the student has only increased by a third. The last increase in tuition fees dates back to 1947-1948. It was between $500 and $600.

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ON THIS DAY IN 1962the Eagle reported, ‘MOSCOW (UPI) – Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev today called for a summit meeting to help settle the Cuban blockade crisis to prevent it from turning into a nuclear war. The official Soviet Tass news agency quoted him as saying in response to a telegram from British philosopher and pacifist Lord Bertrand Russell that the Soviet Union “will not make any rash decisions” in the wake of the Cuban crisis. been quoted as saying that if the United States government “executes its planned program of pirate action, then of course we will have to employ the means of defense against the aggressor; we have no other way out. The First Soviet minister declared that Moscow “will not allow itself to be provoked by the unjustified actions” of the United States. He obviously referred to Washington’s decision to stop any further delivery of offensive weapons to Cuba and to its demand that the s nuclear-capable missile bases are dismantled there. “We will do everything in our power to prevent the outbreak of a war,” Khrushchev said.

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Ciara
Jack Dempsey/AP
Katy Perry
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include the “Happy Days” star Marion Ross, born in 1928; Apollo 9 Astronaut Rusty Schweickart, born in 1935; Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Jon Anderson (Yes), born in 1944; political adviser James Carville, born in 1944; Judas Priest guitarist Glenn Tipton, born in 1947; Basketball Hall of Fame David Cowens, born in 1948; Basketball Hall of Fame Dan Issel, born in 1948; hockey player and Olympic gold medalist Mike Eruzione, who was born in 1954; Actor “The Simpsons” Nancy Cartwright, born in 1957; Star “Square Pegs” Tracy Nelson, born in 1963; Star of “Spin City” Michel Batelier, born in 1964; actress and television host Samantha Bee, born in 1969; “Equalizer” star Adam Goldberg, who was born in 1970; Baseball Hall of Fame Pedro Martinez, born in 1971; Singer “Fireworks” Katy Perry, who was born in 1984; and singer of “Level Up” Ciaraborn in 1985.

Marion Ross
Rich Fury/Invision/AP

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STRIKES OF GENIUS: Pablo Picasso was born on this day in 1881. Considered by many to be the greatest artist of the 20th century, the Spanish painter, sculptor and printmaker is said to have once said: “I am just a public entertainer who understood his time. He died in 1973.

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EDF-XX: The FBI’s first female agents completed their training in Quantico, Virginia on this day in 1972. New agents, Susan Lynn Roley and Joanne E. Pierce, graduated from the 14-week course with a group of 45 men.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

Quoteable:

“Inspiration exists, but it has to find you at work.”

— the artist Pablo Picasso, born on this day in 1881

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