Notable guitarists – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 19:40:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://micgillette.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-2021-08-02T161817.082-150x150.png Notable guitarists – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ 32 32 Emurse kicks off the party with new song “Rootkit” https://micgillette.com/emurse-kicks-off-the-party-with-new-song-rootkit/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 19:17:56 +0000 https://micgillette.com/emurse-kicks-off-the-party-with-new-song-rootkit/ Just in time for the summer vibe, Chicago’s Emurse drops a parting anthem in new song “Rootkit.” The new song is an easy-to-connect single that shows where Emurse is and where he’s going in 2022. A diverse journey and the ability to captivate the masses with his one-of-a-kind sound. The latest single comes on the […]]]>

Just in time for the summer vibe, Chicago’s Emurse drops a parting anthem in new song “Rootkit.” The new song is an easy-to-connect single that shows where Emurse is and where he’s going in 2022. A diverse journey and the ability to captivate the masses with his one-of-a-kind sound. The latest single comes on the heels of Emurse’s performance that thrilled audiences at this year’s Electric Forrest.

For Emurse, “Rootkit” is part of a larger movement that Emurse has meticulously put together. It delivers incredible power through elaborate sound design, wild melodies and well-executed moments of intensity. The single doesn’t try to overcompensate with highly technical verses or unnecessarily overwhelming drops.

Emurse’s story is amazing. Having studied music theory for over a decade, in addition to being a trained guitarist, pianist, bassist and percussionist, Kehres strives to push the boundaries of the melodic side of electronic music. The resume includes collaborations with notable stars Electric Hawk, Trap City, Andrew Huang, Tommee Profitt, Dektora, The Wave Stage, Vibe.Digital, Liquid Ritual and Delphic Syndicate. His work has appeared on television, in film and in advertisements for several luxury brands.

“Rootkit” is now available via vibe.digital. Listen to “Rootkit” below and follow Emurse on social media.

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John Bohlinger remembers famous guitarist Thom Bresh https://micgillette.com/john-bohlinger-remembers-famous-guitarist-thom-bresh/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:16:25 +0000 https://micgillette.com/john-bohlinger-remembers-famous-guitarist-thom-bresh/ “The guitar is my first love, my partner in life. We grew up together and we will probably die together. —Thom Brech One of the best things about being a musician is that musicians know musicians, and musicians are the most interesting people you’ll ever meet. Albert Einstein, Charles Dickens, Georgia O’Keeffe, the Marx Brothers, […]]]>

“The guitar is my first love, my partner in life. We grew up together and we will probably die together. —Thom Brech

One of the best things about being a musician is that musicians know musicians, and musicians are the most interesting people you’ll ever meet. Albert Einstein, Charles Dickens, Georgia O’Keeffe, the Marx Brothers, Clint Eastwood, Jeff Bridges, Juliette Lewis, Jack Black and Zooey Deschanel are or were musicians, but not full time.


Maybe interesting people are interesting because they are interested. If you live a life driven by curiosity, it’s going to be a wild ride. Musicians are driven by curiosity. Almost everyone loves music, but musicians don’t just listen passively. They have to figure out how to do it themselves. This curiosity goes far beyond music, transforming life into a great art/science project. Among the many musicians I have known, there is no one more interesting than Thom Bresh. His life was this project.

I met Thom Bresh at Johnny Hiland’s Birthday Jam at 3rd & Lindsley in Nashville about five years ago. I had the worst performance imaginable for a guitarist: after Bresh, before Brent Mason. I stood at the side of the stage watching Thom play his incredibly intricate guitar, listening to his gripping stories, laughing at his hilarious jokes, and dreading my set. Bresh was so calm on stage, you forgot he was on stage. It was as if the entire audience were his best friends and they sat in his living room hanging on to every word.

After my set, I went backstage to find Bresh in the green room with this Martin/Bigsby, singing a song to my girlfriend.

I watched until the end, then timidly stepped onto the stage to perform. After my set, I went backstage to find Bresh in the green room with this Martin/Bigsby, singing a song to my girlfriend. Bresh had the charm turned up to 10 and regaled her with stories and songs, while flirting shamelessly…throughout my entire set. Years later, when I told him I was trying to seduce my girlfriend, Thom laughed and said, “I’m like a dog chasing a car tire. I wouldn’t know what to do with it if I ever caught it. His smile was impenetrable.

Bresh’s life was like a movie. He was born out of wedlock in Los Angeles in 1948, the biological son of musician Merle Travis and his mother, Ruth Johnson, who later married famed Hollywood photographer Bud Bresh. Bud and Ruth raised Thom as their son in Southern California. As a young man, Thom learned that Travis was his biological father, but he swore out of respect not to speak of it until Bud Bresh died (in 1987). On the surface, Merle Travis was a family friend who taught Thom guitar, but the connection ran much deeper. It must have been tough for a kid, especially in the conservative 50s and 60s. But where it gets really tough is being the son of a legend working in the same field you’re trying to break into. But like all superheroes, this weird origin story may have motivated him to excel at so many things.

The Breshman was a Grammy-nominated artist. He was also a performer, actor, comedian and the world’s youngest stuntman, working regularly from age 3 to 17 at the Corriganville Movie Ranch (referenced in Quentin Tarantino’s latest film, Once upon a time in Hollywood). Bresh was a comedian, television show host, prominent impersonator, engineer, music and film producer, photographer, and songwriter. As a singer, Bresh had a Top 10 hit, “Home Made Love,” which earned a nomination for the Academy of Country Music’s Top New Male Vocalist. He was also nominated for an Academy Award. On top of all this, Thom was the only person to be awarded the honor of “Wine Lord” by the World Council of Bordeaux Wines and the Vignerons Méditerranéens. On top of everything else, Bresh had an incredibly developed palate that allowed him to identify tastes and smells beyond the reach of mere mortals.

On top of everything else, Bresh had an incredibly developed palate that allowed him to identify tastes and smells beyond the reach of mere mortals.

Thom was surrounded by grandeur. He grew up watching Roy Lanham, Speedy West, Thumbs Carllile, Jimmy Bryant, Joe Maphis, Les Paul and, of course, Merle Travis play guitar in living rooms. When you see your dad and his friends doing remarkable things every day, remarkable things seem normal, or at least within reach. Bresh was fearless.

The last time I spoke to Bresh, he said, “I can’t believe this, but I can’t be reserved.” He was as shocked as me. It disappointed me, but watching it now, it seems like the right ending for this movie. Bresh was so talented that he never experienced the struggle of a normal musician. At 15, he replaced Roy Clark in Hank Penny’s band, then ticked every box a guitarist could hope for. The one thing he had never done in his 27,000 days on this planet was not being able to be reserved. In the end, he really had been through it all.

Thom Bresh was buried on June 2, 2022 in Muhlenburg County, Kentucky, next to Travis.

Platform Overview – Thom Bresh

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“Pop music makes the world go round” https://micgillette.com/pop-music-makes-the-world-go-round/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 03:19:57 +0000 https://micgillette.com/pop-music-makes-the-world-go-round/ Inspired as much by showy cabaret shows as hardcore punk gigs, Sydney’s Johnny Hunter is a unique force. Their live set is deliciously unbalanced: they encourage mosh pits and the heady atmosphere typical of skramz shows, but perform in freshly ironed suits and pearl necklaces, bold black eyeshadow and lovely red lipstick. . The concept […]]]>

Inspired as much by showy cabaret shows as hardcore punk gigs, Sydney’s Johnny Hunter is a unique force. Their live set is deliciously unbalanced: they encourage mosh pits and the heady atmosphere typical of skramz shows, but perform in freshly ironed suits and pearl necklaces, bold black eyeshadow and lovely red lipstick. . The concept was mooted as a direct response to the local shows they saw three times a week when they formed in 2017, filled with cut-and-paste psych rock bands desperate to be the next King Gizzard or Tame Impala.

Disillusioned with cheap repetition, the band turned to the UK, where post-punk was enjoying a tumultuous resurgence thanks to IDLES, Fontaines DC and Shame. “We’ve seen these bands come up,” frontman Nick Hutt said NME, “and we were like, ‘Why isn’t anyone here doing this!?’ I know there were bands in Melbourne doing this kind of stuff, but especially in Sydney, everybody was either in a psych rock band or an angelic indie band. So we were like, ‘Hey well, let’s just start making the music we want to listen to, and play the shows we want to see.’ »

Spicing up the usual post-punk recipe was Johnny Hunter’s admiration for ’80s new-wave and synthpop. While living with ex-guitarist Ben Wilson (who left the band in 2020), Hutt discovered the first records of U2 – “and I can’t stress enough, early U2 recordings; back when they were trying to make albums that sounded like Joy Division. Naturally, this rabbit hole led him to an obsession with Joy Division themselves, which in turn led to New Order, and of course David Bowie. Tying it all together with Hutt’s soulful tenor and bass – which might recall David Byrne and Tim Finn, but is actually inspired by Frank Sinatra and Roy Orbison – Johnny Hunter had a winning formula on his hands.

“In Sydney, everyone was either in a psych rock band or an angelic indie band. So we were like, ‘Well, let’s just start making the music that we would like to listen to, and play the shows that we would like to see'”

It took them a while to find that perfect balance between grimy and grandiose. Their debut EP, 2020’s “Early Trauma,” leaned more towards punk because that’s what worked best on their early gigs. Hutt calls the five-song project their “stepping stone to an album” — a necessary exercise before they can commit to a full album. But while taking those songs to bigger venues and honing their craft as songwriters, Johnny Hunter found himself gravitating to the melodic and synthesized elements of their sound.

After all, as Hutt states, “pop music makes the world go round.” Citing Lorde as a notable influence, he continues, “I’m always likely to write a pop song. It’s really annoying, because I should I just want to write these heavy, edgy songs – and I try to write them, but I always find myself writing some kind of pop chorus instead, and I end up like, “God damn it! Well, I guess it’s going to be a pop song! »

Johnny Hunter’s debut album “Want” is full of these shimmering pop tunes (see the silky ballad “Fracture” or the huge hooks of “Dreams” and “The Floor”). But the work on the disc started long before the work on “Early Trauma”. Three of his songs — “Take Off,” “Clover,” and “Endless Days” — even predate their debut single, 2018’s “One Of A Kind.” “In our youthful arrogance,” Hutt says, “we were like, “These are the best songs of all time! We have to save them for the album!” The “Want” track was also locked early; before they even entered the studio, they snapped the cover photo – bassist Nick Cerone, smoking, with the word scrawled across his bare chest with paint blood red – with Triple One member Billy Gunns in his mother’s garage.

“I try to write these heavy, edgy songs, but I always find myself writing some sort of pop chorus instead, and I end up going ‘Goddammit!'”

But Johnny Hunter needed the passage of time, and the growth it brought them, for “Want” to truly come to life. When the group was formed, they had neither big ambitions nor serious intentions. “We were all pretty immature kids,” Hutt says, “and we drank all the time, did drugs, and went out every night… But you realize, when you start trying to make a living, and you work to try to achieve that dream and fuel your ambition, that it’s not really about that.

It didn’t start out as such, admits Hutt, but somewhere along the line “Want” became an outlet for Johnny Hunter by “accepting the fact that we had to grow up.” Even those early songs took on new forms when Hutt reflected on them – in hindsight, “Endless Days” is about “how completely naive I was in my youth”. Hutt sings wistfully how “divine happiness is hard to find» and laments his «wasted time”, but it was written in the back of a van en route to a gig in Byron Bay, where the band’s biggest worry was whether they would be able to find a kebab joint afterwards.

Hutt’s outburst of naivety is chronicled in some of the more recent songs on the record. “Cry Like A Man,” for example, was etched in memory the first time Hutt faced domestic violence, when he was called in to rescue a friend from their abusive partner.

“I was trying to look Star Wars: The Phantom Menace and it ruined my night,” he recalls, “but obviously it ruined a whole relationship and countless friendships. The person was walking around like a macho and totally supporting themselves, like, ‘What else was I supposed to do?!’ And I was just disgusted. I was like, ‘Man, if you just stopped for five seconds, took a few deep breaths and cried a little about this, you’d be fine.’ It was a real turning point for me, where I was like, ‘Oh, that’s why the world is the way it is…'”

“We’re empowered to write the songs we do and perform the way we do, because we’re so comfortable in our own skin with each other”

During the process of creating “Want”, Hutt learned a lot about himself. He adopted a unique form of acting method, living in his on-stage persona of Johnny Hunter for the duration of production. “I would wear my suit to the studio and say to everyone, ‘This is work. And everyone was like, ‘Yeah man, I know, we’re working.’ And I was like, ‘No, it’s work,'” he explains. “It just showed me that I’m so passionate about it – that [developing this band] is the only real thing I want to work towards… Which is good to know about myself. I have the impression that before, I did not know myself too well.

It also galvanized the camaraderie of Johnny Hunter, which Hutt describes as a kind of “crass honesty.” He clarifies: “There is no ego in it. I’m the only real diva in the group, who takes it down a notch from time to time. But if someone’s an asshole, we’ll tell them they’re an asshole, you know? I think it really helps in our songwriting [because] we don’t have to worry about hurting feelings. It allows us to write the songs we do and perform the way we do, because we’re so comfortable in our own skin with each other.

This is where the spirit of Johnny Hunter resides. “We want to be the best we can be for each other,” Hutt says, and “Want” reflects that: “It’s a very honest and vulnerable record, and it sparks a serious passion in us as that group. I hope it ignites the same passion in the people who listen to it.

Johnny Hunter’s ‘Want to’ is now available through Cooking Vinyl Australia

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Patty Griffin on 1000 Kisses https://micgillette.com/patty-griffin-on-1000-kisses/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 01:52:27 +0000 https://micgillette.com/patty-griffin-on-1000-kisses/ This story originally appeared in issue #1 of Paste magazine in the summer of 2002, republished to celebrate Paste’s 20th anniversary. Tender, passionate, incisive, penetrating, authentic, Patty Griffin has a gift for writing direct, conversational and narrative songs. She has a keen eye for the humanity around her, the heart to […]]]>


This story originally appeared in issue #1 of Paste magazine in the summer of 2002, republished to celebrate Paste’s 20th anniversary.


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Tender, passionate, incisive, penetrating, authentic, Patty Griffin has a gift for writing direct, conversational and narrative songs. She has a keen eye for the humanity around her, the heart to feel their joy and sadness, and the integrity to lay that heart bare. His last album, 1000 kisses, showcases this gift in a remarkably poignant way. Closer to the acoustic simplicity that characterizes its beginnings, living with ghosts, the new album features a more mature Griffin. Gone is the inequality that plagued his otherwise impressive previous efforts. His lyrics, vocals, and surrounding arrangements flow unrestrained from the record and straight into the heart. While lacking the appealing punk-rock intensity of Blazing redthe title song of, 1000 kisses is Griffin’s most cohesive and successful effort to date. And that’s saying something for someone who has already earned a reputation as a singer-songwriter.


1000 kisses is Griffin’s debut album for Dave Matthew’s ATO Records, and although it’s only her third release, it’s actually the fifth album she’s recorded (not including the first demo she sold at shows. around Boston). Nile Rogers produced his first record, which A&M rejected. Griffin convinced A&M to release his demos, which became living with ghosts. Rogers’ record was apparently overproduced with little input from Griffin.
“They’re interesting,” she laughs, discussing her hope that these arrangements stay in the vault.

Next Blazing redGriffin recorded silver bellbut that record was scrapped and she was dropped from her label (then Interscope, following a series of mergers and reorganizations).

“It’s kind of what it is,” she says of her struggles with labels. “You might get upset about it, but it wouldn’t really do much good.”

Part of her problems, she thinks, stem from being past her teenage years. “I think that’s probably true in all areas of our culture,” she says. “Women have passed a certain age and they are no longer considered in the race. Strange,” she adds with a laugh. “I feel like I still have things to offer. I don’t feel like I’ve fully gotten over the hill yet.

With his newfound freedom, Griffin recorded 1000 kisses in the basement of guitarist Doug Lancio’s studio. She assembled a stellar little ensemble (Lancio on guitar and mandolin, Brian Standefer on cello, Michael Ramos on accordion, John Deaderick on piano, Dave Jacques on bass and Giles Reeves on percussion and vibrations), recorded her vocals in a day and a half, and finished recording in a few weeks.

“We had so much fun doing it,” she said. “We were just making music. We worried for a very long time that maybe it was terrible because we were having too much fun. And we realized that was probably a good thing.

Griffin bought his first guitar at age 16, but didn’t seriously consider a music career until a few years after moving to Florida after graduating from high school. Listening to U2’s “Pride (In the Name of Love)” got him thinking.

“I was sitting on a beach in Florida on one of my days off – I was a waitress there – and I just thought, ‘I should do this, rather than sitting on a beach. “… vitality, had a soul.

With that, Griffin moved to Boston and balanced a new marriage, odd jobs, guitar lessons, and performing in small clubs. But she never felt part of the Boston folk scene.

“What people called folk music there, I didn’t really have an affinity with that,” she explains. “I didn’t really find this music interesting. I think because there was a woman playing an acoustic guitar, I immediately had that label on me. And I felt resentful of it in that moment, because I never listened to any of that stuff and I thought, ‘Well, how did that happen? You know, I’m just rocking here and you can’t figure this out.

Now she has come to accept that label. “I really don’t care. People are going to call you what they are going to call you, and you are going to be what you are going to be,” she postulates. “It’s very rare for a human being to grab himself, which he is. How the hell is anybody gonna figure out what I am? People just try to put a name to what I do so people understand that I play acoustic guitar most of the time. So, you know, who cares what they call you, really? It makes no difference.

The usually silent Griffin becomes the most vocal when discussing her work with the Vietnam Veterans Foundation of America and its Concerts for a Landmine-Free World, which is not surprising given the acute social conscience expressed. in his writing. Griffin traveled to Vietnam and Cambodia to see VVAF programs. “I really think there’s still a lot of healing that our country still has to do after probably all the wars of the last century that we’ve been involved in,” she mused. “[The people of Vietnam are] more advanced in their recovery than we are. And that interests me. They still have the bullet holes in the walls there, and the shelled buildings. But I think they saw the Americans and they saw that [we] were people and kind of caught up in the same thing they were caught up in. We don’t have that luxury. But we have the opportunity to get to know them through things like this. We have a lot of money and we could really help them.

If there is an endless rope out there without anyone crying, it will be formed with the help of people like Griffin who open their eyes and their hearts and offer whatever rope they can.


Patty Griffin Heavy Rotation:

Bob Dylan: love and theft
Johnny Cash: songs of murder
Morphine: like swimming
George Jones: Greatest hits of all time
Amélie soundtrack


A songwriter’s songwriter

“I would go anywhere, anytime to hear Patty Griffin sing her amazing songs.” -Emmylou Harris

“Patty Griffin is a true gift for music. She’s an amazing, breathtaking artist. She’s what music should be.”—Julie Miller

“I suspect that Patty Griffin’s songs make most people feel a little uneasy, like they’ve just stepped into a private moment in someone else’s life and they know that ‘They should turn around and tiptoe away, but they can’t. They make me jealous. —Steve Earle

“I remember hearing Patty sing her song ‘Mary’ in a stunning solo performance one night. It brought me to tears and it’s still the truest test for me. Her voice alone is enough. to rave and then there’s the songs! I’m amazed that Patty isn’t already famous.”—Lucinda Williams.

“I told Patty she was a genius. She said I was wrong…so…she’s brilliant, okay?” – Bruce Cockburn

“It’s Patty Griffin’s gift; with her voice and her songs, she lights up the dark places, tells the stories of the quietest among us, and breaks every heart in the room with her knowledge of love and its fallout. 1000 Kisses is a masterpiece of writing and singing, confirming that Patty Griffin is one of the most eloquent and gifted artists in contemporary music today. ——Mary Chapin Carpenter


To listen Paste Sampler #1 featuring “Chief” by Patty Griffin on Spotify.

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Having trouble hearing WPDH on 106.1? https://micgillette.com/having-trouble-hearing-wpdh-on-106-1/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 10:53:48 +0000 https://micgillette.com/having-trouble-hearing-wpdh-on-106-1/ Sullivan County classic rock fans have reported trouble listening to their favorite radio station. While many people in the Hudson Valley are familiar with 101.5 WPDH, some may not be aware that the Home of Rock and Roll also broadcasts on a second FM frequency. In areas north of Middletown through Sullivan County, WPDH can […]]]>

Sullivan County classic rock fans have reported trouble listening to their favorite radio station.

While many people in the Hudson Valley are familiar with 101.5 WPDH, some may not be aware that the Home of Rock and Roll also broadcasts on a second FM frequency. In areas north of Middletown through Sullivan County, WPDH can be heard on 106.1. The simulcast fills a radio “dead zone” that is struggling to receive a strong signal on 101.5.

Unfortunately, some WPDH listeners in Sullivan County recently had trouble connecting to 106.1. If you’ve noticed that WPDH no longer comes through clearly at 106.1 on your radio, you can help fix the problem. Just send a quick email to the Program Director of WPDH at joseph.limardi@townsquaremedia.com. Be sure to document where you were when you had trouble logging in and what time of day it was.

Close-up shot of woman pressing phone control button on car multimedia system

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Temporary problems such as solar flares, inclement weather, and other atmospheric conditions can cause reception problems, but ongoing problems with a radio station’s broadcast could be more serious issues requiring further investigation. Interference from unlicensed radio operators, poorly shielded electronic equipment, or other radio stations operating at too much power can cause you to suddenly lose reception of local broadcasts. In these situations, documentation of radio listeners is necessary to identify and resolve the problem.

In the meantime, WPDH can still be heard through the free mobile app which allows listeners in poor reception areas to hear the station in crystal clarity. If you are having trouble receiving The Home of Rock and Roll on your radio, be sure to let us know and try streaming online until the problem is resolved.

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Celebrity Horoscopes and Birthdays for Tuesday, June 21 | Tips https://micgillette.com/celebrity-horoscopes-and-birthdays-for-tuesday-june-21-tips/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/celebrity-horoscopes-and-birthdays-for-tuesday-june-21-tips/ Birthday today (06/21/22). Collaborate for a shared gain this year. Grow with regular exploration, investigation and research. Resolving physical challenges this summer leads to energized fall health and fitness. Imagine and plan privately this winter for springtime social gatherings, parties and teamwork. Friends make the world go round. To get the advantage, check the day […]]]>

Birthday today (06/21/22). Collaborate for a shared gain this year. Grow with regular exploration, investigation and research. Resolving physical challenges this summer leads to energized fall health and fitness. Imagine and plan privately this winter for springtime social gatherings, parties and teamwork. Friends make the world go round.

To get the advantage, check the day rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the hardest.

Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is an 8 — You are getting stronger. Pluck your nest, with the Sun in Cancer. Home improvement or moving projects satisfy. Feed the family. The comforts of home recharge you.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is a 7 — Organize your thoughts. Research, write and express your point of view, with the Sun in Cancer for a month. Sketch and sketch. Spread the word.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is an 8 — Launch lucrative projects, with the Sun in Cancer. The next four weeks can become particularly lucrative. Develop sources of income. Keep bosses and customers satisfied.

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Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is a 9 — You are strong, intelligent and confident, with the Sun in your sign for the next month. Take advantage of the spotlight. Personal passion projects feed your heart.

Leo (July 23-August 22) – Today is a 7 – Study the options. Track and complete past cases. Work behind the scenes this month under the Sun of Cancer. Plan and prepare privately.

Virgo (August 23-September 22) — Today is an 8 — You have additional team support, with the Sun in Cancer. Share support, resources and information. Social events benefit your career. Connect with friends.

Libra (September 23-October 22) — Today is a 9 — Collaboration pays. Advance your career and status, with the Sun in Cancer. Enjoy a lucky break over the next month. You bloom professionally.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is an 8 — Prioritize pleasure. Venture into new realms under this month’s Cancer Sun. Investigate and search. Explore, study and inspire adventure. Develop a fascinating investigation.

Sagittarius (November 22-December 21) — Today is an 8 — Get your finances straight and review your family budget. Develop sense and good business practices, with the Sun in Cancer. Manage shared finances for growth.

Capricorn (December 22-January 19) — Today is a 7 — For a month, with the Sun in Cancer, focus on strengthening your relationships. Compromise, negotiate and look for win-win situations.

Aquarius (January 20-February 18) — Today is a 9 — Work comes first. Physical action works, with the Sun in Cancer. Provide excellent service. Prioritize your health and well-being. Practice regularly. Feed yourself.

Pisces (February 19-March 20) – Today is a 9 – You are especially lucky in love. The following month is conducive to romance, with the Sun in Cancer. Embark on new passion projects. Creativity springs up. Enjoy.

Notable anniversaries: Actor Bernie Kopell (“The Love Boat”) is 89 years old. Actor Monte Markham is 87 years old. Actor Mariette Hartley is 82 years old. Comedian Joe Flaherty (“SCTV”) is 81 years old. Musician Ray Davies of The Kinks is 78 years old. Actor Meredith Baxter (“Family Ties”) is 75. Actor Michael Gross (co-star of Baxter in the sitcom “Family Ties”) is 75. Badfinger guitarist Joey Molland is 75. Drummer Aerosmith’s Joey Kramer is 72. Guitarist Nils Lofgren is 71. Actor Robyn Douglas (TV’s “Galactica,” movie “Breaking Away”) is 70. Cartoonist Berke Breathed (“Opus,” “Bloom County “) is 65. Actor Josh Pais (“Ray Donovan”) is 64. Country singer Kathy Mattea is 63. Actor Marc Copage (“Julia”) is 60. Actor Doug Savant ( “Desperate Housewives,” “Melrose Place”) is 58. Little Texas guitarist Porter Howell is 58. Actor Michael Dolan (“Hamburger Hill,” “Biloxi Blues”) is 57.

Filmmaker Lana Wachowski (“The Matrix,” “Speed ​​Racer”) is 57. Actress Carrie Preston (“The Good Wife”) is 55. Actress Paula Irvine (“Santa Barbara”) is 54 years old. Country singer Allison Moorer is 50 years old. Juliette Lewis is 49 years old. Actress Maggie Siff (“Mad Men”) is 48 years old. Bassist Justin Cary (Sixpence None the Richer) is 47 years old. Incubus guitarist Mike Einziger is 46 years old. Actor Chris Pratt (“Jurassic World,” “Guardians of the Galaxy”) is 43. Singer Brandon Flowers of The Killers is 41. Actor Jussie Smollett (“Empire”) is 40. The actor Michael Malarkey (“The Vampire Diaries”) is 39. Singer Kris Allen (“American Idol”) is 37. Singer Lana Del Rey is 37. Actor Jascha Washington (films “Big Momma’s House”) is 33. LANCO bassist Chandler Baldwin is 30. Vocalist Rebecca Black is 25.

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Steely Dan through his years at Pine Knob – The Oakland Press https://micgillette.com/steely-dan-through-his-years-at-pine-knob-the-oakland-press/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 14:52:08 +0000 https://micgillette.com/steely-dan-through-his-years-at-pine-knob-the-oakland-press/ The number of musicians per capita on stage was impressive on Saturday evening June 8 at the Pine Knob Music Theatre. And so was the musicality displayed by Steely Dan and opener Snarky Puppy. It’s no surprise either way, of course. Both groups thrive on a masterful genre-fusing big band aesthetic, Steely Dan with its […]]]>

The number of musicians per capita on stage was impressive on Saturday evening June 8 at the Pine Knob Music Theatre.

And so was the musicality displayed by Steely Dan and opener Snarky Puppy.

It’s no surprise either way, of course. Both groups thrive on a masterful genre-fusing big band aesthetic, Steely Dan with its 13 members and Snarky Puppy with its nine. The ambitious scopes of their respective music come from a jazz base, with shared passions for R&B and funk while Steely Dan has, since 1972, infused these into a rock/pop template.

It’s a winning and even revolutionary formula on both counts, with Snarky Puppy clearly a student of the headlining master. And on a weather night as pleasant as you could ask for an outdoor concert, the two bands delivered a veritable Saturday night special for around 10,000 fans.

Photo by Mike Ferdinande

Steely Dan performs Saturday night June 18 at the Pine Knob Music Theater (Photo by Mike Ferdinande)

Snarky Puppy has won a lot of new fans with his 45-minute set, previewing material from his upcoming album “Empire Central” (out September 30). The Michael League-led collective churned out a generous 45-minute set of their nimble instrumentals, balancing precision arrangements with adventurous improvisations that at times visibly surprised the musicians themselves. League praised the Pine Knob crowd for their attention at one point, and the opener well deserved a rare standing ovation at the end.

It was a great table setter for Steely Dan, the ’70s studio dweller who’s been a regular on the road since 1993. Donald Fagen has been running the ship these days since the 2017 death of his musical partner Walter Becker. (not mentioned once during the hour and the 45 Minute Show after his estate was sued over financial matters) but much like someone like, say, Brian Wilson, he positions himself as a creator showcasing his works as delivered by a group of assistants.

And those “helpers” are no small part of why Steely Dan cooks on stage these days. Together, for the most part, since around 2003, this particular line-up is well versed in Fagen and Becker’s complex material, well enough to give even the most faithful interpretations a few touches of freshness via nuances or solos. On Saturday, guitarist and musical director Jon Herington recreated the parts created by myriad predecessors in his own style, while his new six-string partner Adam Rogers, a well-accredited player and solo artist from New York who played on the Becker’s 1994 solo album ’11 Tracks of Whack’ fits in easily and features ‘Aja’ and ‘Bodhisattva’ in particular.

Steely Dan’s catalog is so full of 70s Album Rock must-haves that it would take hours to carve them all, so Fagen and company once again came up with a thoughtfully curated set list that featured exclusions. notables (“Do It Again”, “Rikki Don’t Lose That Number”) and, with the exception of “Green Flower Street” from Fagen’s 1982 solo album “The Nightly, None of What Came After ‘Gaucho’ from the 1980s. But that hardly left fans wanting.

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On the beat: be smart! and The Click to Play Capitol Punishment Reunion Show Saturday | Music https://micgillette.com/on-the-beat-be-smart-and-the-click-to-play-capitol-punishment-reunion-show-saturday-music/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/on-the-beat-be-smart-and-the-click-to-play-capitol-punishment-reunion-show-saturday-music/ Four bands who played The Drumstick and The Brickyard in the 80s reunite on Saturday for the Capitol Punishment 2022 Reunion Show. Named after the Capitol Punishment Fanzine, which from 1980 to 1984 chronicled Lincoln’s punk/new wave scene, released recorded compilations of local bands, booked shows at rental venues and hosted bands from around the […]]]>

Four bands who played The Drumstick and The Brickyard in the 80s reunite on Saturday for the Capitol Punishment 2022 Reunion Show.

Named after the Capitol Punishment Fanzine, which from 1980 to 1984 chronicled Lincoln’s punk/new wave scene, released recorded compilations of local bands, booked shows at rental venues and hosted bands from around the world. Out of town, the reunion show will bring together Lawrence, Kansas’ Get Smart!, featuring Lincoln’s The Click and Baby Hotline, and Kearney’s Sacred Cows for an evening of music at Duffy’s Tavern.

Get Smart!, a three-piece alternative rock ‘n’ roll trio, earned a national reputation for intense gigging and released a few highly regarded albums that received airplay on college radio in the mid-’80s.

Baguette Favorites, Get Smart! reformed a few years ago, releasing “Oh Yeah No”, a collection of previously recorded songs, mixed by Steve Albini late last year and playing 40+1 anniversary shows in Lawrence and Chicago.

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One of Lincoln’s top bands of the time, The Click formed in 1980 from New Wave band The Specs, which included a young Matthew Sweet, and Omaha punk band The Rebates.

Led by glamorous and charismatic vocalist Sara Kovanda, who would paint her face half black and half white and cram into a glass-encased trash can, the foursome became Drumstick regulars early on and then weekend headliners. end and has opened for the likes of Romeo Void, The Professionals and L’embarrassment.

Baby Hot-Line, a hardcore skate punk band that mixed thrash with Ventures-style surf music, created an invigorating wall of noise from their unannounced 1983 debut at a KZUM all-ages event until until they split up a few years later.

Sacred Cows, a trio from Kearney, formed in 1982, toured, then broke up before having the chance to record more than the EP “Separatist” and the songs they did for the Capitol Punishment tapes.

Tickets for the 7:30 p.m. show are $15. Advance tickets are available at Duffy’s Tavern.

Record Store Day Part 2 Saturday

Record Store Day will return for a second drop of 2022 on Saturday, largely because strong demand for vinyl has made all the titles that were slated for the spring drop impossible.

“That’s the main reason,” said Les Greer of Lefty’s Records. “There were more titles that couldn’t come in April. But this one doesn’t have as many titles.

Records likely to get people into stores on Saturday include Prince’s ‘The Gold Explosion’ on gold vinyl, live recordings from Pearl Jam and Peter Gabriel, the soundtrack to ‘The Royal Tenenbaums’ – “there’s still a soundtrack that people went crazy for.”

Partly due to the reduced number of titles, local stores will not open at 7am, the usual start time of Record Store Day. Instead, Lincoln Vintage Vinyl will open at 9 a.m. and Lefty’s at noon standard hour.

The latter is not due to the small number of titles. Greer plans to go to the Captiol Punishment show – “and it wouldn’t work if I opened at 7 a.m., that’s for sure.”

Upcoming trade fairs in Bourbon

The Bourbon Theater has just announced two notable shows:

Steve Earle and the Dukes, who just played Westfair Amphitheater outside Council Bluffs, Iowa, as the opening act for Turnpike Troubadours, will be at the Bourbon on August 4. Earle, who hasn’t played at Lincoln since 2016, when he joined Emmylou Harris for a concert to benefit refugees. The country literary outlaw has a fine album, “Jerry Jeff,” a set of his version of songs by Jerry Jeff Walker, one of his mentors.

Dead Boys, the most punk of the original CBGB punk bands, is set to play the Bourbon on October 12. The Dead Boys, originally from Cleveland, were active from 1975 to 1980 and have banded together periodically since. Stiv Bators, the band’s ultra-destructive frontman, died in 1990. But the reunited Dead Boys, fronted by guitarist Cheetah Chrome and drummer Johnny Blitz, have been great every time I’ve seen them. This old punk is excited about this one.

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Lamb of God Releases “Nevermore” Video; ‘Omens’ LP 10/7 https://micgillette.com/lamb-of-god-releases-nevermore-video-omens-lp-10-7/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 23:37:04 +0000 https://micgillette.com/lamb-of-god-releases-nevermore-video-omens-lp-10-7/ Lamb of God Rocks a Semi-Truck in New Video for Pulverizing Single, “Nevermore”; ‘Omens’ Out 10/7 Last week longtime heavy metal outfit lamb of god announced their comeback with news of a new album, omensas well as a North American tour for the fall. Days after the initial reveal, the record’s first single, “Nevermore,” arrived […]]]>

Lamb of God Rocks a Semi-Truck in New Video for Pulverizing Single, “Nevermore”; ‘Omens’ Out 10/7

Last week longtime heavy metal outfit lamb of god announced their comeback with news of a new album, omensas well as a North American tour for the fall.

Days after the initial reveal, the record’s first single, “Nevermore,” arrived alongside a new music video depicting the band as precious cargo, slamming through song in the back of a tractor-trailer while Strange things happen to the truck driver. Musically, the track mixes Lamb of God’s typical relentless heavy metal/thrash energy with a crunchy groove, tailor-made to hit the head:

A press release characterizes omens with the following:

Densely muscled, steeped in unnerving spite, with a pessimistic look at inner struggles and world affairs, Omens is a furious entry into the Lamb Of God catalog, perhaps their most angry album to date. “The world is crazy and keeps changing. Omens is a reaction to the state of the world,” says vocalist D. Randall Blythe. “It’s a very edgy record.” He pauses to insist. “He’s extremely pissed off.”

Once released, omens will be Lamb of God’s ninth record to date, and first since 2020’s eponymous affair. Art Cruz, who stepped in on an interim basis before taking over full-time drum duties.

With omensLamb of God recorded the new material in the same room at Henson Recording Studios in Los Angeles, formerly known as A&M Studios, a facility that in the past housed major recording sessions by The Doors, Pink Floyd, The Ramones and Soundgarden, among others.

The list of tracks:

Never again
Disappearance
At the grave
Ditch
omens
Gomorrah
Sick designs
Shades of grey
Opt-out mechanism
september song

Click here to pre-order omens on CD from our Rock Cellar store
Click here to pre-order omens on LP from our Rock Cellar shop

“The inner workings of the band have never been better,” said guitarist Mark Morton. “You can hear it in omens. You can see it in our performances, and if you’re around us for five minutes, you can feel it.

Speaking of performances, Lamb of God will headline the US this fall with special guest Killswitch Engage on all dates. Support will also come in various stages of the tour from Baroness, Motionless In White, Spiritbox, plus Animals As Leaders as well as Suicide Silence and Fit For An Autopsy.

Lamb of God:

D. Randall Blythe – Vocals
Mark Morton – Guitar
Willie Adler – Guitar
John Campbell – Bass
Art Cruz – Drums

The dates:

September 9 – Brooklyn, NY – Coney Island
September 10 – Camden, NJ – Liberty Mortgage Pavilion
September 11 – Alton, Virginia – Blue Ridge Music Festival
September 13 – Youngstown, OH – Youngstown Foundation Amphitheater
September 14 – Baltimore, MD – Chesapeake Employers Insurance Arena
September 16 – Atlanta, Georgia – Coca Cola Roxy
September 17 – Jacksonville, Fla. – Daily’s Place
September 18 – Tampa, FL – MIDFLORIDA Credit Union Amphitheater
September 21 – Boston, MA – MGM Music Hall at Fenway
September 23 – Louisville, KY – Louder Than Life Festival * No KSE, No Suicidal Silence
September 24 – Chicago, IL – Huntington Bank Pavilion at Northerly Island
September 25 – Sterling Heights, MI – Michigan Lottery Amp at Freedom Hill
September 26 – Indianapolis, IN – TCU Amphitheater at White River State Park
September 30 – Denver, CO – Fillmore Auditorium
Lamb of God with Killswitch Engage, motionless in white, worthy of an autopsy
October 01 – Salt Lake City, UT – The Great SaltAir
October 02 – Grand Junction, CO – Las Colonias Park Amphitheater
October 04 – Fresno, CA – Showroom at Selland Arena
October 07 – Sacramento, CA – Aftershock Festival *Not worthy of an autopsy
Lamb of God with Killswitch Engage, Spiritbox, Fit For An Autopsy
October 09 – Vancouver, BC – Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Center
October 10 – Kent (Seattle), WA – Accesso ShoWare Center
October 11 – Portland, OR – Cloud Theater
Lamb of God with Killswitch Engage, Animals as Leaders, Autopsy Worthy
October 13 – Inglewood, CA – YouTube Theater
October 14 – Phoenix, AZ – Arizona Federal Theater
October 15 – Albuquerque, New Mexico – Isleta Amphitheater
October 16 – El Paso, TX – UTEP Don Haskins Center
October 18 – San Antonio, Texas – Freeman Coliseum
October 19 – Houston, Texas – 713 Music Hall
October 20 – Irving, TX – The Toyota Music Factory Pavilion

]]> For “Highway to Henryetta” by Troy Aikman, Blake Shelton is joined by his wife Gwen Stefani | Local News https://micgillette.com/for-highway-to-henryetta-by-troy-aikman-blake-shelton-is-joined-by-his-wife-gwen-stefani-local-news/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 00:15:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/for-highway-to-henryetta-by-troy-aikman-blake-shelton-is-joined-by-his-wife-gwen-stefani-local-news/ HENRYETTA — Five minutes before the start of Blake Shelton’s main event set, “Highway to Henryetta” host Troy Aikman welcomed special guests into their special seats. Among those guests were Barry Switzer, who was Aikman’s OU coach in 1984-85 and his Dallas Cowboys coach in 1994-97; and Stephen Jones, Jerry’s son and executive vice president […]]]>

HENRYETTA — Five minutes before the start of Blake Shelton’s main event set, “Highway to Henryetta” host Troy Aikman welcomed special guests into their special seats.

Among those guests were Barry Switzer, who was Aikman’s OU coach in 1984-85 and his Dallas Cowboys coach in 1994-97; and Stephen Jones, Jerry’s son and executive vice president of the Cowboys.

Forty-five minutes into Shelton’s performance, he introduced a special guest: his famous wife Gwen Stefani, who sang her debut hit No Doubt (“Don’t Speak”) and a duet with her husband (whose fame spread because of his involvement in the talent show “The Voice”).

“I knew I was going to love this show tonight. I knew it,” Shelton said from the big stage at Henryetta’s Nichols Park. Oklahoma, baiting my deer stands with corn I got back in my truck and got a text from Troy Aikman.

“He asked me if I would come and do this (show). It was last fall. I said, “Man, I’d be honored to be a part of it.” I grew up in Ada. I can’t count how many times I’ve driven back and forth on I-40, and passed through Henryetta, Oklahoma – the home of Troy Aikman.

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Ten hours earlier, before the start of the inaugural “Highway to Henryetta” music festival, Aikman was asked about Nichols Park and how it was set up and prepared for a one-day festival.

“(It’s) probably bigger than I imagined,” said Aikman, a 1984 graduate of Henryetta High School. “I have a great team. I was here (Friday) and saw it for the first time. I think they did an amazing job, especially considering all the rain we’ve had in the last 36 hours. We mulched it and dried it out as best we could. I think it’s as good as we could have hoped for.

Pointing to his left, Aikman added, “I played baseball in the park here.”

“Obviously,” he added, “it’s unlike anything that’s ever happened in Henryetta.”

Located 52 miles south of downtown Tulsa, Henryetta has a population of 5,800. For the “Highway to Henryetta”, around 10,000 music lovers poured into the muddy park.

A 24-ounce Coors Light had a list price of $12.50. Chicken on a stick: $10. Bacon and cheddar ranch fries seemed popular at $12.

In the concert area of ​​the park, there are only seven trees. As the temperature soared to 93 degrees, the shade provided by these trees was in great demand before sunset.

Shelton was preceded on the main stage by Pat Green, the Josh Abbott Band, Wade Bowen and Stoney Larue, as well as George Dunham and The Bird Dogs. Green effectively worked the crowd: “Today, Henryetta is the coolest place on the planet.”

The day’s soundtrack was loaded with Aikman’s beloved country music, but fans seemed thrilled to hear some rock covers. Bowen performed “Night Moves” by Bob Seger and “Lyin’ Eyes” by the Eagles. While Larue’s band was fronted by a fantastic guitarist, they made an interesting medley that tied together The Jackson Five’s ‘I Want You Back’, Ted Nugent’s ‘Cat Scratch Fever’ and Tom Petty’s ‘Runnin’ Down a Dream’ .

There were two stages: the large main stage and the second “Hen House” stage. On the second stage were artists – including Mikayla Lane – who would do a 30-minute set as the main stage was prepared for the next artist on this side of the festival.

Lane, 17, juggles a showbiz quest with online classes at Mannford public schools. She recorded at a studio in Tulsa, made several appearances at Cain’s Ballroom, and gained early career support from Shelton and her executives.

“I found out that we were added to Henryetta’s list on my mother’s birthday,” Lane said. “The only other time I had been here was when we played at a retirement home.”

The energy level of the show doubled when Lane was on stage for the first of her two sets. “It’s my first festival,” she announced before her stellar band cooked during a cover of Shania Twain’s “Any Man of Mine.”

“I’m so lucky to have this group,” Lane said. “I love that there were only a few people on our stage when we started, and then you look up and see people coming from all over.”

For 13 years, Steve Norman served as Henryetta’s Chief of Police. It was a Saturday on the bridge for the Henryetta Police Department. The 12 officers spent the whole day and evening at the festival. Security assistance was provided by the Okmulgee Criminal Justice Authority and the Okmulgee County Sheriff’s Department.

“So far today,” Norman said at 5 p.m., six hours after the doors opened, “we have had zero criminal incidents. Zero.

“I really didn’t know what to expect, but when you literally double the size of the city, you never know. But so far, yes, everyone has done very well. No problem.

Norman is a permanent resident of Henryetta and a graduate of Henryetta High School in 1993. His son, Brady Norman, will be Henryetta’s starting second quarterback this season. When Aikman was here in October, announcing his plan for the “Highway to Henryetta,” he was photographed for Tulsa World with Brady Norman.

As the show continued until 10:15 a.m., there never seemed to be any crowd control issues.

The festival was presented by AT&T and produced to raise funds for various community and educational issues in the Henryetta area. Aikman’s Oklahoma Weekend kicked off with the Friday donation of refurbished computers to 300 students in the Henryetta-Okmulgee area.

“I really believe in values ​​and who I am – they were instilled during my years here at Henryetta,” said Aikman, 55, who after quarterbacking for the Henryetta Hens became a starter for the Sooners, a NFL No. 1 draft pick with the UCLA Bruins and three-time Super Bowl champion with the Dallas Cowboys. In 2006, he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

“I can’t imagine life without having spent some of it here in Oklahoma. I wish my own daughters could have experienced small town America,” said Aikman, who after 21 seasons as a Fox Sports games analyst moved to ESPN for Monday Night Football. “I’m thrilled that we have the chance to introduce (Henryetta) to people who have never been here before.”

bill.haisten@tulsaworld.com

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