Guitar teachers – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 14:55:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://micgillette.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-2021-08-02T161817.082-150x150.png Guitar teachers – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ 32 32 Andrea Tomasi, ‘In the mystery’ | Album review | Seven days https://micgillette.com/andrea-tomasi-in-the-mystery-album-review-seven-days/ https://micgillette.com/andrea-tomasi-in-the-mystery-album-review-seven-days/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 14:01:25 +0000 https://micgillette.com/andrea-tomasi-in-the-mystery-album-review-seven-days/ Click to enlarge Courtesy Andrea Tomasi, In the mystery (self-published, digital) Put on your headphones and enter the ether. With whispers, songs and echoing harmonies, Andrea Tomasithe new album of, In the mystery, immerses listeners in full awareness. The experience – sometimes like walking in the woods or watching the ocean waves – is meditative, […]]]>

Click to enlarge

  • Courtesy
  • Andrea Tomasi, In the mystery

(self-published, digital)

Put on your headphones and enter the ether. With whispers, songs and echoing harmonies, Andrea Tomasithe new album of, In the mystery, immerses listeners in full awareness. The experience – sometimes like walking in the woods or watching the ocean waves – is meditative, gentle, and reminds that a powerful voice is an interesting instrument.

On her website, Tomasi, from Vermont and Montpellier, describes herself as “a lover of the incarnation, a cultivator of presence … an explorer of frequencies and resonances”. She qualifies the song as an “expression of a deep incarnation” which puts her in the “‘now’ of every moment”. Presence in the moment is a recurring theme throughout In the mystery, which is inspired by folk, new-age, ambient and traditional Celtic music.

Tomasi wrote his first album in 2013 Hurricane dream in New York and did it at Team Love Records in New Paltz, NY In the mystery was a year-long project that she wrote and recorded in a cramped bedroom in Portland, Oregon. She aimed to provide “a source of healing for the world,” according to her Bandcamp page, and was inspired by poets such as Wendell Berry and Rumi.

Although she wrote In the mystery while on America’s West Coast, Green Mountain’s influence is strong: Tomasi credits fellow folk musicians Abigail Nessen Bengson and Moira Smiley as mentors.

Mindfulness teachers will tell you that conscious breathing centers the souls and calms the nerves. Tomasi, a trained yoga instructor, often audibly inhales to prepare to sing a note and audibly exhales as she sings it. She seems to invite the listener to breathe with her.

In “The Peace of Wild Things”, Tomasi sings the lyrics to Berry’s poem of the same name; her delivery amplifies her feeling that healing peace can come from nature. As she sings the Unstable Awakening in the Night at the start of the song, her tone rises, relaying the anxiety. As she sings the last line on Rest in Grace, her voice has shrunk to silence, as if she has sighed in relief.

The sound of birds chirping permeates “Visible Breath,” whose lyrics are taken from the myth of the Oglala Sioux nation of the White Bison Spirit Woman, according to Tomasi’s Bandcamp page. “With a visible breath I walk / A voice I send out as I walk / In a sacred way I walk,” she sings. The guitar notes chosen by Simon Jermyn join the avian chorus as Tomasi, between the verses of the poem, raises and lowers his vocal register, chanting “whoas” and “ohs” like a mantra.

Although some critics heard echoes of Joni Mitchell and Buffy Sainte-Marie in Tomasi’s voice, her sweet vocal clarity evoked thoughts of Feist. The reminder, and her diction vaguely Delores O’Riordan, of the Cranberries.

Any track on In the mystery sounds Celtic enough to play on NPR’s “The Thistle & Shamrock” or WGBH Boston’s “A Celtic Sojourn”. Program directors, are you listening?

In the mystery is available on andreatomasi.bandcamp.com.


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Funky with a Backbeat: Lake Street Dive Drummer Talks Green Tour and “Obviously” Chart Top Release https://micgillette.com/funky-with-a-backbeat-lake-street-dive-drummer-talks-green-tour-and-obviously-chart-top-release/ https://micgillette.com/funky-with-a-backbeat-lake-street-dive-drummer-talks-green-tour-and-obviously-chart-top-release/#respond Mon, 18 Oct 2021 22:20:19 +0000 https://micgillette.com/funky-with-a-backbeat-lake-street-dive-drummer-talks-green-tour-and-obviously-chart-top-release/ On Wednesday, Lake Street Dive will visit Wilmington’s Live Oak Bank pavilion at Riverfront Park. (Port City Daily / Photo by Shervin Lainez) WILMINGTON – Covid-19 has changed the way many industries work. It turns out that rock ‘n’ roll is not exempt either, at least not for musicians on tour. For Mike Calabrese of […]]]>
On Wednesday, Lake Street Dive will visit Wilmington’s Live Oak Bank pavilion at Riverfront Park. (Port City Daily / Photo by Shervin Lainez)

WILMINGTON – Covid-19 has changed the way many industries work. It turns out that rock ‘n’ roll is not exempt either, at least not for musicians on tour.

For Mike Calabrese of Lake Street Dive, it prompted him to ask, “What’s worth giving up?”

Sometimes playing over 300 concerts a year, the Brooklyn-based band – who tour Wilmington Wednesday night – have been living on the road for more than a decade. Calabrese and his friends and bandmates, including Rachael Price (vocals), Mike “McDuck” Olson (guitar, trumpet) and Bridget Kearney (bass), founded Lake Street Dive in 2004 while attending school in New York City. England Conservatory of Music.

They started performing in nightclubs and small venues before gradually transforming into amphitheatres and pavilions. Changes and shifts have happened along the way: changing the record company three times, adding keyboardist Akie Bermiss in 2017, and losing founding member Olson, who announced his departure in the spring.

In March 2020, as the pandemic shut down the music industry, Calabrese found himself in a situation he had never faced before: being at a standstill. During the shutdown, the musician was able to take a close look at the first seven months of his son’s life – something he said he couldn’t do when he welcomed his first child into the family he years ago.

“For my wife and I, it was the longest time we’ve ever spent together because we met when I was a musician on tour,” he said. “And I don’t think we ever spent more than three months together before I hit the road again.”

These days, Lake Street Dive is reconsidering how they work after Covid-19. Calabrese, in particular, has confirmed that he is looking at the music industry from a different perspective than he did in January 2020.

“At our group meeting yesterday, we discussed how we can maintain creativity for our music, but also maintain creativity in this ever-changing world that we now realize is very, very fragile,” did he declare. “And be sustainable.”

When the tour ended, it naturally affected income. Still, Calabrese said what he won was immeasurable.

“I realized that very little was worth giving up or sacrificing for other parts of life,” he said. “We actually have the opportunity to do our best at the moment, so I think that’s at the heart of it all that we continue to balance touring, home life and our personal needs right now. , even after Covid. … How do you get all of these elements – your personal health, the health of your family life and the health of your career to support each other? ”

Calabrese said he started thinking seriously about mental health a few years ago as he prepared for the arrival of his first child. A palpable terror and depression set in as he began to weigh in on the heaviness of the world as a whole, especially climate change. He addressed it on Lake Street Dive’s seventh album, “Obviously”, specifically on the track “Making Do”.

“I don’t think anything like having a child makes you say ‘Oh, I have to take care of more things than myself,’” Calabrese said.

He wanted the song to expand the hearts and minds of his listeners, in the same vein as the band’s love songs about Breakups (“Mistakes”, “What I’m Doing Here”), Love No shared (“Rental Love”), and the new relationships have struck a chord with listeners in the past. Only this time around, Calabrese called her song of love to the land and her daughter “Making Do”, without any imagery or flowery language.

“I was like, ‘I don’t have the energy for poetry right now,'” he recalls. “I’m going to say exactly what I’m thinking and how I’m feeling. I don’t think it’s surprising that this is what makes a song memorable.

The process was cathartic, Calabrese explained, “These are the things that make you want to write music. And that is why music is a powerful processing tool for the writer.

Even more restorative acted on the road. Over the past two years, Lake Street Dive has tried to reduce its carbon footprint. It’s a small part they can control in an otherwise busy industry – musical and theatrical tours consume a lot of fuel from the artists who travel the world from city to city.

“We buy offsets for our tours, carbon offsets, which is just a way to decrease carbon creation, or to suck carbon out of the air elsewhere by planting trees or by developing trees. wind turbines, ”Calabrese said. “In a way that matches the carbon footprint of our tour: we fly, we take a bus, we stay in hotel rooms. All of these things are high carbon activities.

All of the group’s lighting is LED, which reduces energy by 75% compared to using incandescent bulbs. Their bus also has solar panels installed on its roof.

“You can make it work for a few days,” he said. “If no one is using it, you can run the refrigerator and the lights on solar panels, especially if you’re in the south and southwest.”

Lake Street Dive is touring to support “Obviously”, released on Nonesuch Records in March 2021. Already, the album has reached # 1 on Americana / Folk, # 2 on Current Rock Albums and # 2 on Current Alternative Albums, as as well as # 5 on Billboard’s Best Albums chart.

Its release had been delayed by more than a year, although the group finished “Obviously” in Nashville just days before the Covid-19 closures went into effect. They enlisted the help of producer Mike Elizondo.

“We wanted to produce in a way that was heavily influenced or directly inspired by the hip-hop movement,” Calabrese said. “I mean, hip-hop is kind of an invention.”

Elizondo has worked with Eminem, 50 Cent, Dr. Dre, as well as Fiona Apple and Carrie Underwood. Due to their influence in hip-hop, the band reached out, knowing that the producer was only making three or four albums a year. It turns out that Elizondo also had Lake Street Dive on his radar.

“He has wanted to work with us for years,” Calabrese said. “It was humiliating.”

Although Elizondo brought decades of experience to the studio, Calabrese was clear the relationship was simpatico: Elizondo listened intently and encouraged Lake Street Dive to follow their instincts, the drummer said. He worked to honor their sound while pushing them beyond their comfort zones and opening up the arrangements further.

“He really brought things out of us that he heard that we never necessarily captured,” Calabrese said.

It can be heard on many tracks, including “Feels Like the Last Time”, which features Bermiss’s beatboxing.

The uptempo “Hush Money” was one of the last songs Calabrese worked on with Olson. Although Calabrese did not write it, Olson requested his musical contribution.

“I gave him a hook and a leg,” Calabrese said.

The drummer said he first saw a good track through his percussion. “He must also have a certain grip,” Calabrese said.

“Hush Money” basically revolves around the idea of ​​how money can be used in harmful ways. “This song is definitely a holdover from some of our more political songs,” Calabrese said.

He called Olson one of his songwriting teachers, as well as double bass player Kearney (who helped write “Making Do”). Olson announced his departure from Lake Street Dive in May, with his last touring show taking place in June. It was an amicable split, according to the group, which praised its co-founder on social media as “friend, leader, listener, dreamer, thinker, schemer, supporter, agitator, songwriter. both silly and hot, performs tasty guitar parts and mind-blowing trumpet solos, backing arranger, steak cutter and the all-time number one, philosophical waxing star for hours on end for take us through the night trips in a van.

When Lake Street Dive debuted 16 years ago, their intention was to become a traditional jazz band.

“We had these heavy, theoretical and high esoteric ideas,” Calabrese said.

Then Olson turned things around and planted the seed to become a freeform jazz band that would perform in honky tonk dive bars. In this sphere, it meant people would dance and have a good time.

Lake Street Dive started playing with cross genres and bending sounds early on; soulful R&B beats came to life on accents of jazz, rock and pop melodies. Calabrese said they wanted harmonies reminiscent of Simon and Garfunkel with the magnetic rhythms of Diana Ross.

“I remember being in the studio and Rachael saying, ‘Guys, we look funky – like, there’s a backbeat. He has a good tempo. We all just play and the songs are about three and a half minutes long. But what does that mean? ‘”

They started noticing very early on, as they performed in the dives, that the songs people reacted to the most were the ones they could dance to. It became a quintessential detail on which Lake Street Dive would thrive – one that Calabrese said came from road testing their sounds and the commitment of serious youth to play without barriers.

“I think that’s why, to date, with the exception of the most recent record – which captured us in a new and more exciting way – we’ve been mostly a live band that people want to come and see… I don’t think it was until this last record where the recording actually clearly represents the energy you would find from us on stage.

Lake Street Dive will stop at the Live Oak Pavilion on Wednesday, October 20 for the last Live Nation show from Riverfront Park of the season. Tickets from $ 25; Covid-19 vaccination records or a negative Covid-19 test are required at entry.


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New web platform seeks to rethink pluralist Jewish education https://micgillette.com/new-web-platform-seeks-to-rethink-pluralist-jewish-education/ https://micgillette.com/new-web-platform-seeks-to-rethink-pluralist-jewish-education/#respond Sun, 17 Oct 2021 14:21:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/new-web-platform-seeks-to-rethink-pluralist-jewish-education/ New digital marketplace aims to create pluralistic and diverse Jewish learning experiences and great Jewish educators accessible to anyone in the world with an Internet connection. The new platform, called Truvie (truvie.org, a play on “The Find” in French), and powered by The Jewish Education Project, will offer a range of experiences reflecting the dynamic […]]]>
New digital marketplace aims to create pluralistic and diverse Jewish learning experiences and great Jewish educators accessible to anyone in the world with an Internet connection.
The new platform, called Truvie (truvie.org, a play on “The Find” in French), and powered by The Jewish Education Project, will offer a range of experiences reflecting the dynamic and evolving nature of Jewish education: from Jewish history or Jewish texts to Minecrafting a Sukkah, a Jewish Music Jam Circle virtual guitar, exploring Torah using circus arts, and more. The online marketplace offers synchronous Jewish education for children in Kindergarten to Grade 12, with an initial three-month beta period launching Oct. 18 for Grades 3 through 8.

Inspired by the Outschool platform and curated for a modern, multidimensional Jewish population, Truvie is primarily designed to reach children who are not currently engaged in any form of Jewish education. It will allow both individual educators and organizations to offer short courses in which learners enroll for a series of weeks rather than a school year or full semester, with advanced tools for teachers, parents and students.

“We have learned over the past year and a half that while various educational platforms have unique qualities, they all reflect the fundamental belief that the consumer will choose what is right for them,” said Susan Wachsstock, program manager at Jewish Education Project. “We wondered if we could design a market for Jewish education that would similarly support the level of choice, convenience and flexibility built into these platforms. We believe that Truvie is the realization of this vision as a market supporting pluralism, excellence and diversity.

Some studies estimate that less than half of young Jews currently attend a religious school or day school. The platform will offer a scalable selection of live streamed courses, as well as a unique set of features for camps, congregations, JCCs and others looking to take advantage of technology and an open market.

Truvie is funded in part by the Jewish Community Response and Impact Fund (JCRIF).

ARAB-ISRAELI teacher, Nedaa Rabie, poses in her classroom at Gvanim Secondary School in Kadima in 2013. Gvanim Secondary School currently employs five Arab teachers and is a successful example of the Ministry of Education program. for the integration of teachers from Arab schools into the Jewish (credit: HADAS PARUSH / FLASH90)


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Haines High School art students launch skate park fresco project https://micgillette.com/haines-high-school-art-students-launch-skate-park-fresco-project/ https://micgillette.com/haines-high-school-art-students-launch-skate-park-fresco-project/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 18:12:35 +0000 https://micgillette.com/haines-high-school-art-students-launch-skate-park-fresco-project/ Giselle Miller, an art teacher at Haines, takes a photo of art students (Photo by Corinne Smith / KHNS) There was palpable excitement in the air, as students, families, teachers and friends gathered on a cool fall evening to view the Haines Art Students’ Skate Park Mural Project. There was food, music and catching up, […]]]>
Giselle Miller, an art teacher at Haines, takes a photo of art students (Photo by Corinne Smith / KHNS)

There was palpable excitement in the air, as students, families, teachers and friends gathered on a cool fall evening to view the Haines Art Students’ Skate Park Mural Project. There was food, music and catching up, as it was also one of the first community events since a recent wave of COVID last month.

“It’s so sweet. I’m so happy that people are coming here to see our pieces,” said senior Trygve Bakky, looking at the large indoor skate park, as the skaters navigate and the younger ones play on the ramps. .

“We have been working on it since the end of August, the beginning of September. This was a full course that we all took, sort of outlining the process of distributing artwork via graffiti, and how we do it legally? You know, write a proposal to the borough, kind of explain what we were doing, ”Bakky said.

Artist Jeremy Settem paints during the community demonstration event. (Photo by Corinne Smith / KHNS)

The class, led by art teacher Giselle Miller, and assisted by local artist Jeremy Setem, involved developing proposals with designs and budgets submitted to the borough. They studied the history of graffiti and street art, painting and spray painting techniques and the execution of their ideas.

Now the walls and railings are adorned with distinct colorful paintings in different styles and sections.

“I worked on painting the universe there, it was a lot of fun,” Bakky said, gesturing to a large ramp.

Next to the orbiting planets, there is a large shape-line killer whale. This is one of the many works of art that was there before that have been incorporated, such as a multi-colored face painted by a young Haines, Mario Benassi Jr., tragically died in river accident in California A few years ago. There is now a new mural of Benassi next door, singing and playing the guitar.

Artwork at the skate park (Photo by Corinne Smith / KHNS)

Freshman Hayden Jimenez once said the skate park is kind of forgotten. There was garbage and a lot of penis drawings. It might even be intimidating for some. Now, he says, it’s a lot more fun.

“Better energy in general from the skatepark,” Jimenez said. “Yes, there are some pretty cool and talented artists and artwork. “

On one wall is a striking woman in profile, wearing a mask, shedding a dark blue tear.

“I really love pop art, so that’s the inspiration for it,” said Aubrey Cook, the senior artist. She reflected on what it was like to exhibit her work in a public space.

“I think it was so cool, I’ve never done that kind of piece. Especially so big, I’ve never done a piece this big, ”Cook said. “If you had been here before, it was just a bunch of graffiti all over the place, with inappropriate things, but now it’s like a really nice space. And we’ve all learned that it’s a living, breathing space, which means it will eventually be covered by other people’s artwork, but we’re really grateful that we had this opportunity to to paint.

Aubrey Cook with his work of art. (Photo by Corinne Smith / KHNS)

And it was a hard lesson. During the course project, some rooms were partially vandalized and had to be repainted. Art teacher Giselle Miller said there had been an apology and the class addressed the situation together.

“It’s part of street art. It’s part of graffiti, it’s changing and evolving, ”Miller said. “I think teaching students this impermanence is also very important. I made a few big chunks and they’re gone, so documentation is also very important and part of the process.

Miller said she was incredibly proud of their personal and artistic growth.

The community can now view student artwork at the Haines skate park.


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Become a six-string god this Rocktober with $ 80 off an annual subscription to online guitar lessons Guitar Tricks https://micgillette.com/become-a-six-string-god-this-rocktober-with-80-off-an-annual-subscription-to-online-guitar-lessons-guitar-tricks/ https://micgillette.com/become-a-six-string-god-this-rocktober-with-80-off-an-annual-subscription-to-online-guitar-lessons-guitar-tricks/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 14:08:36 +0000 https://micgillette.com/become-a-six-string-god-this-rocktober-with-80-off-an-annual-subscription-to-online-guitar-lessons-guitar-tricks/ The world of online guitar lessons is getting to be very competitive, with a multitude of virtual teachers all vying for your hard earned money. However, there is one that stands out from the crowd – Guitar Tricks. Often hailed as the original pioneer of the online lesson – from 1998 onwards! – they certainly […]]]>

The world of online guitar lessons is getting to be very competitive, with a multitude of virtual teachers all vying for your hard earned money. However, there is one that stands out from the crowd – Guitar Tricks. Often hailed as the original pioneer of the online lesson – from 1998 onwards! – they certainly know a thing or two about teaching the guitar. For a very limited time, Guitar Tricks offers an annual subscription for only $ 99 – that’s a savings of $ 80!

We truly live in the information age, and there has never been a better time to learn an instrument – especially with so much free online content. That said, it can be difficult to separate the big from the mediocre, with so much going on. This is where Guitar Tricks comes in. This historic learning platform has used its many years in the field to hone its craft and develop an education system that guarantees results. Available for absolute beginners who want to take their first steps in the vast world of guitar or for experienced players looking to improve their game, Guitar Tricks offers over 11,000 videos in its database, as well as over 900 songs in which you can get your teeth into. Songs featured include rock n roll royalty, such as AC / DC, The Beatles, ZZ Top, Creedence Clearwater Revival, and Eric Clapton, to name a few. So no matter what type of guitarist you want to be, you’re sure to find lessons to suit your playing style.


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Clark County Schools Mariachi Program Growth Strengthens Latino Community https://micgillette.com/clark-county-schools-mariachi-program-growth-strengthens-latino-community/ https://micgillette.com/clark-county-schools-mariachi-program-growth-strengthens-latino-community/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/clark-county-schools-mariachi-program-growth-strengthens-latino-community/ A soft but rhythmic “one, back, very” brings music to life in a Las Vegas high school classroom decorated with illuminated posters and colorful photos of student musicians. Members of Las Vegas Mariachi Joya High School the ensemble begins to play their violins, trumpets, guitars – including the guitarrón and the vihuela, respectively larger and […]]]>

A soft but rhythmic “one, back, very” brings music to life in a Las Vegas high school classroom decorated with illuminated posters and colorful photos of student musicians.

Members of Las Vegas Mariachi Joya High School the ensemble begins to play their violins, trumpets, guitars – including the guitarrón and the vihuela, respectively larger and smaller than the guitar – and harp to the tune of a classic folk song called Cielito Lindo.

Ay ay ayay, canta y no llores, ” the students sing in Spanish, some swinging with their instruments in their hands. The refrain, translated into English, means “sing and do not cry”.

It’s a Tuesday afternoon rehearsal, one of many that take place in the Clark County School District throughout the year. The group goes through their entire show, all the songs are memorized and repeat the sections as needed, in preparation for the next performance.

The district runs what officials say is the largest mariachi program in the country, exposing thousands of students to a traditional part of Hispanic culture. The program has grown steadily since its launch in 2002 with 250 students from four schools. Today, approximately 6,000 middle and high school students participate in an elective mariachi course offered at 27 schools.

Mariachi, a genre of Mexican folk music originating in a region of western Mexico, is the result of the mixture of indigenous and foreign cultural and musical elements, according to the Smithsonian Institution. Over the centuries and with the help of media, such as radio and film, mariachi has become popular and has refined its sound and outlook on what we know today.

“[Having culturally diverse programs] is critical to our success, ”said Jeff Williams, high school fine arts coordinator in the school district. “We need to support programs that reflect our community and maintain the interest of our students, and that really honors the culture from which our district thrives. “

About 47% of students in the district identify as Hispanic or Latino, making it the largest racial or ethnic group of students. Any student can join the mariachi program, although many are Hispanic or Latino.

The Las Vegas High School Mariachi Program is one of the newer ones. It was launched in 2018, serving a school where nearly three quarters of students are Hispanic. Today, 250 students from all grade levels participate in the optional mariachi class. Students must audition for Mariachi Joya, the best ensemble group representing the school.

“Mariachi is the music of the people. It’s something that I think is very, very special for a lot of these families, ”said Stephen Blanco, director of the mariachi program at Las Vegas High School. “And even those who didn’t grow up in a Hispanic home, even those whose parents don’t speak Spanish. It’s still their music because that’s what they do with it. “

For Blanco, a native of Detroit, the work marked a return to family roots. Her father grew up and graduated from high school in Las Vegas.

“Joya filled a void that I didn’t know I had in my life,” he said. “I didn’t know if I wanted to get a group director position or if I wanted to go back to school, but when I got the call it made sense. It was good. It’s 2,000 miles from my home, but it was kind of like coming home which was never my home but I feel like it.

Despite the short duration of the program at school, the group took care of virtual and in-person performances in Las Vegas and across the country, representing the city and its diverse culture.

The students, who wear red suits called trajes covered with silver embroidery and white neck knots with the letters “LV”, played virtually for the inauguration of President Joe Biden and registered an album during full-time distance learning. Most recently, they participated in a local Mexican Independence Day celebration, traveled to Washington, DC, play for the Mexican embassy in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month and were presented at the National Conference on Immigrant Integration last week in Las Vegas. This is in addition to school events, such as the Homecoming assembly and sports games.

Busy as they are, Blanco said he demands high standards from his players in their schoolwork and constantly contacts them and their teachers. At least half of the seniors in his mariachi classes are close to graduating with honors, he added.

Blanco reminds students of “Be a joya”, the latter being the Spanish word for “jewel”.

“We talk a lot about being a joy, shine brightly, be strong, set an example for others, ”he said. “You can’t have bad grades. You can’t skip classes every now and then, like other students do.

Louie Saldate, a young violinist, entered high school excited that mariachi was an option, inspired to try it out after growing up listening to Mexican classics at home. Not having participated in the orchestra or the marching band in college, he was a little shy at first. But after being in mariachi class for the past few years and joining Mariachi Joya, Saldate said that now is his life and he sang and performed with passion and pride.

“Mariachi is your main focus besides school – school first, then Joya,” Saldate said with a smile. “My favorite part is definitely the audience. The audience can make or break your performance… When everyone is having fun it’s hard to mess up or if you mess up then you laugh and keep going.

Daniellee Ureña performs with the Las Vegas High School Mariachi Band at the National Immigrant Integration Conference at the Westgate Resort and Casino in Las Vegas on Tuesday, October 5, 2021 (Daniel Clark / The Nevada Independent)

Daniellee Ureña echoed this sentiment, despite entering the mariachi world at the end of her high school career. She is senior and has just started this year. Ureña has followed in the footsteps of her older siblings, playing the trumpet in a band, but she is the first in her family to join the mariachi ensemble.

“The performance is what kept me in any group. I love playing. I love the rush of it. I love adrenaline. I love being with the band, ”said Ureña, her shiny silver glasses. “There is so much energy. There is always so much love for everyone.

Ureña couldn’t fit the mariachi class into her schedule, so she attends after school rehearsals and trains in her spare time. The dedication impresses his mother, Maria Millan.

“She divides her time with marching band practices, rehearsals, performances with the mariachi, schoolwork – she likes to triple the time,” said Millan. “She’s really good at what she does and we’re very proud of her. Every time we go to see her, we feel honored and proud that she is our little one.

The Mariachi class brings a culture and heritage that not only can students appreciate, participate in, and identify with, Blanco said the performances also help unify the community.

“A while ago, a few weeks ago, nobody was going to leave after we were done playing. Everyone stayed – the whole audience, ”Blanco said. “That’s when I realized ‘That’s who it is for, a community is starting to be made. Ultimately.'”



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Great job near UCLA! Music teachers wanted for home lessons – Piano, vocals, guitar https://micgillette.com/great-job-near-ucla-music-teachers-wanted-for-home-lessons-piano-vocals-guitar/ https://micgillette.com/great-job-near-ucla-music-teachers-wanted-for-home-lessons-piano-vocals-guitar/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 00:05:22 +0000 https://micgillette.com/great-job-near-ucla-music-teachers-wanted-for-home-lessons-piano-vocals-guitar/ www.CaliforniaMusicAcademy.com – Thousand Oaks, CA 91362 www.CaliforniaMusicAcademy.com – Thousand Oaks, CA 91362 www.CaliforniaMusicAcademy.com – Thousand Oaks, CA 91362 job description MUSIC TEACHERS REQUIRED FOR HOME TEACHING – CALABASAS, AGOURA HILLS, WESTLAKE VILLAGE, THOUSAND OAKS, SIMI VALLEY, MALIBU. Website: www.CaliforniaMusicAcademy.com We are currently looking for several outstanding teachers to teach HOME music in student homes. Salary: […]]]>

www.CaliforniaMusicAcademy.com – Thousand Oaks, CA 91362

www.CaliforniaMusicAcademy.com – Thousand Oaks, CA 91362

www.CaliforniaMusicAcademy.com – Thousand Oaks, CA 91362

job description

MUSIC TEACHERS REQUIRED FOR HOME TEACHING – CALABASAS, AGOURA HILLS, WESTLAKE VILLAGE, THOUSAND OAKS, SIMI VALLEY, MALIBU.

Website: www.CaliforniaMusicAcademy.com

We are currently looking for several outstanding teachers to teach HOME music in student homes.

Salary: $ 35 to $ 45 per hour, DOE

Conditions:

* Active musician
* Holder of a degree in music, or in the process of obtaining one, or has a solid musical background
* Lives in a reasonable driving time to our main service areas.
* Enjoys working with toddlers, children and teens
* Outgoing and friendly personality with consistent professional demeanor
* Advantage: can teach multiple instruments such as Piano & Voice, Piano & Guitar, Guitar & Voice.
* Willing and able to teach a few days a week (flexible hours / days)
* Able to schedule lessons and maintain an up-to-date schedule
* Has a reliable car.
* Clean up criminal records and DMVs. Be able to pass a background check
* Able and willing to commit to teaching in our school for at least one year

Please send your resume, photo, and contact details (if possible, also a link to your professional profile page or social media page) to: CaliforniaMusicAcademy@gmail.com

OR text Joe at 818-657-9966

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www.CaliforniaMusicAcademy.com


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In Burkina Faso, many hope that the Sankara trial “will shed light on his murder” https://micgillette.com/in-burkina-faso-many-hope-that-the-sankara-trial-will-shed-light-on-his-murder/ https://micgillette.com/in-burkina-faso-many-hope-that-the-sankara-trial-will-shed-light-on-his-murder/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 10:04:26 +0000 https://micgillette.com/in-burkina-faso-many-hope-that-the-sankara-trial-will-shed-light-on-his-murder/ Fourteen men, including a former president, will be tried in Burkina Faso for the assassination in 1987 of Thomas Sankara, the country’s revolutionary leader and Pan-African icon. Near the Thomas Sankara memorial site, where he was assassinated 34 years ago, street vendors and visitors say they expect the trial to “shed light on his murder.” […]]]>

Fourteen men, including a former president, will be tried in Burkina Faso for the assassination in 1987 of Thomas Sankara, the country’s revolutionary leader and Pan-African icon. Near the Thomas Sankara memorial site, where he was assassinated 34 years ago, street vendors and visitors say they expect the trial to “shed light on his murder.”

Nicknamed Che Guevara of Africa, Thomas Sankara wanted to “decolonize spirits” in Burkina Faso and across the continent, but his revolutionary dreams were cut short when he was shot in a 1987 coup after only four years in power.

The trial of the alleged perpetrators of the assassination, including his former friend Blaise Compaoré who succeeded him as president and reigned for 27 years, opens Monday in the capital Ouagadougou.

Despite his short period in power, Sankara remains a revered figure for many.

During the mass protests that toppled Compaoré in 2014, young people carried portraits of Sankara in the air – although many were not even born during the reign of the Marxist-Leninist leader.

“Sankara is a whole philosophy, a way of thinking and being, a way of life. Sankara is a pride of Africa, ”said Serge Ouedraogo, high school teacher.

“Today, we can say that Sankara represents a compass for the Burkinabé people. He is a guide, it is he who blazed the trail of hope for the people.”

– Increase in power –

Born on December 21, 1949 in Yako in the north of the poor and landlocked country, Sankara grew up in a Christian family, his father being a former soldier. He was only 12 when the country gained independence from France.

After completing his secondary studies in Ouagadougou, he followed military training abroad. He was in Madagascar for the 1972 uprising which overthrew President Philibert Tsiranana, considered by his enemies as a lackey of the former colonial power France.

Returning to his native country in 1973, Sankara was assigned to train young recruits and stood out in a border war with Mali in 1974-1975.

After a coup in 1980, the new leader, Colonel Saye Zerbo, appointed Sankara as his secretary of state for information. But the soldier’s radical views caused him to leave government a year and a half later.

Sankara was appointed Prime Minister in January 1983 after another military coup, which led to a quiet power struggle within the military.

He was arrested in May 1983 but was later appointed president in August after another coup d’état – this one led by his close friend Compaoré.

At only 33 years old, Sankara symbolized African youth and integrity for his supporters.

He changed the name of the country from Upper Volta during colonial times to Burkina Faso – “the land of honest men”.

He moved into a dilapidated presidential palace with his wife and two sons, as well as his guitar – he was a decent player, according to his contemporaries.

He also brought in a used Renault 5 and imposed the small French model as a car for all government personnel, removing the larger vehicles.

– Denounce “imperialist” wars –

Slender and athletic, Sankara always dressed in military fatigues, and on his belt liked to display a pistol with a mother-of-pearl handle given to him by the North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung.

The priorities of his reform program included reducing the size of the civil service, improving health care, national literacy, food self-sufficiency, measures to help peasants, vaccination and the construction of pharmacies in the villages.

He banned female genital mutilation and forced marriage, among other measures to promote the rights of women, which he oversaw with an iron fist.

The population was monitored by the Revolutionary Defense Committees and sanctioned by the People’s Revolutionary Court, which opposed traditional tribal leaders and other holders of wealth and power.

“We must decolonize minds,” he proclaimed.

However, he began to crack down on unions and political opposition, ending a strike by teachers by sacking them.

Sankara also urged Africa to refuse to pay its debt to Western countries and spoke out at the United Nations to denounce “imperialist” wars, apartheid and poverty. He also defended the Palestinians’ right to self-determination.

Relations with France and several neighboring countries, including Côte d’Ivoire led by Félix Houphouët Boigny and Togo led by Gnassingbé Eyadema, have grown strained.

He was considered too close to Muammar Gaddafi’s Libya and Jerry Rawlings’ Ghana.

Sankara even gave François Mitterrand a lesson in human rights in 1986 after the French president received Pieter Botha, the leader of the South African apartheid regime, in Paris.

“It goes further than necessary in my opinion,” commented the socialist Mitterrand.

On October 15, 1987, summoned to an extraordinary cabinet session, Sankara was struck down by his comrades during a putsch which left Compaoré alone in power. He was only 37 years old.

*** AFP ***


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New digital market makes Jewish education accessible globally https://micgillette.com/new-digital-market-makes-jewish-education-accessible-globally/ https://micgillette.com/new-digital-market-makes-jewish-education-accessible-globally/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 17:44:33 +0000 https://micgillette.com/new-digital-market-makes-jewish-education-accessible-globally/ (October 8, 2021 / JNS) A new digital market aims to make pluralistic and diverse Jewish learning experiences and talented Jewish educators accessible to anyone in the world with an Internet connection. Known as Truvie, a play on “Lucky Find” in French, the online platform is powered by The Jewish Education Project. It will offer […]]]>

A new digital market aims to make pluralistic and diverse Jewish learning experiences and talented Jewish educators accessible to anyone in the world with an Internet connection.

Known as Truvie, a play on “Lucky Find” in French, the online platform is powered by The Jewish Education Project.

It will offer a range of experiences reflecting the dynamic and evolving nature of Jewish education, from Jewish history or Jewish texts to Minecrafting a sukkah, and a virtual Jewish guitar jam circle to explore Torah using the circus arts.

The online marketplace offers synchronous Jewish education for children in Kindergarten to Grade 12, with an initial three-month beta period launching Oct. 18 for grades 3-8.

“We have an incredible opportunity to reach and involve tens of thousands of families and children who do not have access to existing Jewish education options,” said Susan Wachsstock, program manager for the Jewish Education Project. “While face-to-face education in a vibrant community is irreplaceable, the pandemic has amplified both the need for digital options and the opportunity that these options provide for more learners to do so. experience of meaningful and inspiring Jewish education. We are excited about the possibilities that Truvie brings to just about any Jewish family.

Inspired by the Outschool educational platform and curated for a modern, multidimensional Jewish population, Truvie is primarily designed to reach children who are not engaged in any form of Jewish education.

It will allow both individual educators and organizations to offer short courses in which learners register for a series of weeks rather than a full school year or semester. Teachers will have the freedom to create the courses and content they want to teach when they want.

“We have learned over the past year and a half that while various educational platforms have unique qualities, they all reflect the fundamental belief that the consumer will choose what works for them,” adds Wachsstock. “We wondered if we could design a market for Jewish education that would similarly support the level of choice, convenience and flexibility built into these platforms. We believe that Truvie is the realization of this vision as a market supporting pluralism, excellence and diversity.

The Jewish Education Project notes that the program may fill a void, as some studies estimate that less than 50 percent of young Jews currently attend a religious or day school. On a large scale, Truvie will offer a scalable selection and an endless number of live streamed courses, as well as a feature set for camps, congregations, TCGs and other institutions looking to take advantage of technology and development. ‘an open market.

Truvie-approved educators have extensive experience in Jewish history, language, the arts, music and more, and represent the breadth of Jewish identity and affiliation.

“We know that Jewish education must continue to adapt to remain relevant and meaningful in people’s lives,” adds David Bryfman, CEO of The Jewish Education Project. “Looking to the future, we innovate and create Jewish education resources, experiences and platforms to support Jewish educators in all kinds of settings that will allow so many young Jews and their families to thrive in the world today. “

Truvie is funded in part by the Jewish Community Response and Impact Fund (JCRIF).


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Kent H. Sheeler | Obituary https://micgillette.com/kent-h-sheeler-obituary/ https://micgillette.com/kent-h-sheeler-obituary/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://micgillette.com/kent-h-sheeler-obituary/ July 3, 1940 — Oct. 2, 2021 MIDDLE GRANVILLE – Kent H. Sheeler, 81, died at his home on October 2, 2021, after a long illness. Kent was born July 3, 1940 in Lynn, MA, son of Harold and Nellie (Chase) Sheeler, where he spent his childhood attending Red Sox games with his uncle Bill […]]]>

July 3, 1940 — Oct. 2, 2021

MIDDLE GRANVILLE – Kent H. Sheeler, 81, died at his home on October 2, 2021, after a long illness.

Kent was born July 3, 1940 in Lynn, MA, son of Harold and Nellie (Chase) Sheeler, where he spent his childhood attending Red Sox games with his uncle Bill and uncle Arthur, who convinced him that his real middle name was Moses. As a child he believed this for many years. He never lost his love for the Red Sox.

When his family moved to New York, they settled in Raceville. Kent loved living in Raceville and always had the small community close to his heart. He often shared stories about his childhood in Raceville.

As a teenager, they moved to Middle Granville. Kent attended Granville Central Schools before enlisting in the military in 1958. He was stationed in Germany during the Cold War years.

After his release from the military, Kent met and married his wife Barbara (Fabian) in 1966. They had a daughter, Holly, in 1967.

After his first attack of transverse myelitis in 1967, later diagnosed as multiple sclerosis, Kent returned to school and earned a bachelor’s degree from Castleton State Teachers College in Vermont as a special education teacher. He taught remedial reading at Longfellow School in Rutland, VT for three years, then at Mary J. Tanner School in Middle Granville. He retired in 1985 due to complications from multiple sclerosis.


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