Guitar teachers – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 11:39:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://micgillette.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-2021-08-02T161817.082-150x150.png Guitar teachers – Mic Gillette http://micgillette.com/ 32 32 Royal Irish Academy of Music Adult Division – Lessons https://micgillette.com/royal-irish-academy-of-music-adult-division-lessons/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 10:10:08 +0000 https://micgillette.com/royal-irish-academy-of-music-adult-division-lessons/ The Royal Irish Academy of Music (RIAM) launched a new Adult division offering instrumental and vocal lessons, performance opportunities, music appreciation and professional development for adult musicians at all levels, from beginners and advanced to seasoned professionals. For the first time in RIAM175 years of history, adult musicians and appreciators will have full access to […]]]>

The Royal Irish Academy of Music (RIAM) launched a new Adult division offering instrumental and vocal lessons, performance opportunities, music appreciation and professional development for adult musicians at all levels, from beginners and advanced to seasoned professionals.

For the first time in RIAM175 years of history, adult musicians and appreciators will have full access to the Academy’s faculty of professional musicians, teachers and doctoral students, many of whom perform in the National Orchestras of Ireland.

Courses lasting eight to 12 weeks will take place twice a year, culminating in a celebratory concert every quarter. Beginner, intermediate and advanced lessons will be available in a variety of disciplines including clarinet, classical piano, flute, French horn, guitar, jazz piano, low brass, vocals, percussion, saxophone, trumpet and violin.

Professional musicians and teachers can sign up for a range of courts Continue professional development courses designed to improve performance and instruction, including RIAM Key skills for piano teachers, Kodaly method and conducting for choristers, and historical interpretation for professional string players.

Each term of the RIAM The adult division will include a new Friday Morning Music Appreciation Series. RIAM Piano teacher Anthony Byrne leads the way with an introduction to the grand piano repertoire and pianists of the 20th and 21st centuries, with guest performances from the Academy’s most promising third-tier pianists. Future discussions will see the return of RIAM Director Deborah Kelleher’s “History of” series and Discovering Opera with Head of Vocal Studies Kathleen Tynan.

For more information on courses see below or visit www.riam.ie/adultdivision.

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Filmmore! patrols the school in a new video for ‘Where’s Your Hall Pass?’ https://micgillette.com/filmmore-patrols-the-school-in-a-new-video-for-wheres-your-hall-pass/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 11:14:23 +0000 https://micgillette.com/filmmore-patrols-the-school-in-a-new-video-for-wheres-your-hall-pass/ Filmmore! is a character exploration influenced by Gen Z Tyler, The Creator using electro, punk, drum ‘n’ bass and hip-hop sounds. Music history is dotted with famous alter egos, from Eminem’s Slim Shady and Megan thee Stallion’s Tina Snow to Tyler, The Creator’s IGOR and MF DOOM. Tebi Rex’s Dafe Orugbo has clearly taken notice, […]]]>

Filmmore! is a character exploration influenced by Gen Z Tyler, The Creator using electro, punk, drum ‘n’ bass and hip-hop sounds.

Music history is dotted with famous alter egos, from Eminem’s Slim Shady and Megan thee Stallion’s Tina Snow to Tyler, The Creator’s IGOR and MF DOOM.

Tebi Rex’s Dafe Orugbo has clearly taken notice, as he returns as the strict security patrol of the Filmore School! in the video for her brand new single “Where’s Your Hall Pass?”.

The clip sees Filmore! surveying the halls for dear life, chasing down anyone dumb enough to test their patience as riotous guitar riffs propel the punk-tinged track up and up.

According to a report from his teachers, the charismatic student showed mixed abilities to take advantage of the educational environment: “As you are no doubt aware, we have had difficulties with Filmore! for some time now – with his behavior in drop well below the standards we expect of students at this institution. After a particular incident involving the fixed closet, myself and the principal decided to offer him two options – either to spend the remainder of the school year in detention, or join the school security patrol.

“He chose the latter and certainly threw himself into the task with enthusiasm, if at times a little too enthusiastically,” the report continues. “I know he and his partner Ingrid think they’re doing the right thing in keeping the school safe for all students, especially those he describes rather singularly as ‘geeks’, although he went too far many times.”

The influence of hip-hop, drum ‘n’ bass and electro is clear as day, with the artist effortlessly jumping between genres throughout the track.

Watch the video for ‘Where’s your Hall pass?’ below.

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Music will live in San Antonio https://micgillette.com/music-will-live-in-san-antonio/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 19:37:23 +0000 https://micgillette.com/music-will-live-in-san-antonio/ A lump in my throat slowly grew when I heard about the San Antonio Symphony Orchestra folding. I was one of thousands of San Antonio Independent School District fourth graders who first saw the symphony perform at the Lila Cockrell Theater. I remember the conductor, Harvey Biskin, talking about the music, the composer and what […]]]>

A lump in my throat slowly grew when I heard about the San Antonio Symphony Orchestra folding. I was one of thousands of San Antonio Independent School District fourth graders who first saw the symphony perform at the Lila Cockrell Theater.

I remember the conductor, Harvey Biskin, talking about the music, the composer and what to listen to, then he would conduct short 30 second excerpts of a piece of music so the audience could listen to it. identify when played in the largest context with the full orchestra. I particularly remember a thrilling rendition of Tchaikovsky’s “1812 Overture”. When the cannon shots rang out, I almost jumped out of my seat with delight.

After the concert, I was changed. I was moved. I was motivated to learn an instrument. Soon after, my mother encouraged me to take guitar lessons, which made me fall in love with bass. I will never forget the music played by the musicians at the time.

Today, musicians who played in the San Antonio Symphony will continue to perform locally and give fabulous concerts. These musicians are of the highest caliber of professionalism and artistry.

That said, the South Texas Symphonic Orchestra, or STXSO, the other band from San Antonio orchestra, will also continue to give concerts with a full orchestra and delight audiences of all ages.

Since 2017 we have performed classical works, symphonies by Beethoven and Bruckner, pop performances and music from popular musicals and Disney films. In 2018, we were invited by the City of San Antonio to provide symphonic music for San Antonio’s official 4th of July celebration at Woodlawn Lake. In addition, STXSO organizes educational concerts for elementary school students every year. Last year, we performed for over 14,000 students across Texas via live concerts and live streams at Texas A&M University-San Antonio. We also collaborate each year with the San Antonio Youth Ballet in their December production of “The Nutcracker”.

STXSO is made up of auditioned musicians, most of whom have music degrees and most have played in professional level orchestras across the United States. Our musicians are music teachers, doctors, lawyers, stay-at-home moms and dads, accountants, students, salespeople, business owners – all of whom have spent years perfecting their instrument. Like any professional-level musician, they rehearse for hours in preparation for each gig.

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What conservative evangelicals have lost 6/24/2022 https://micgillette.com/what-conservative-evangelicals-have-lost-6-24-2022/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 23:31:58 +0000 https://micgillette.com/what-conservative-evangelicals-have-lost-6-24-2022/ Evangelicals/fundamentalists have lost while winning. They won a Supreme Court that overturned their big goal Roe v. Wade. It’s gone and it’s done. The judgment of 1973 will never come again. In states where the GOP is virtually led by fundamentalists, legislatures have already agreed to ban abortion or are about to do so. But […]]]>

Evangelicals/fundamentalists have lost while winning. They won a Supreme Court that overturned their big goal Roe v. Wade. It’s gone and it’s done. The judgment of 1973 will never come again. In states where the GOP is virtually led by fundamentalists, legislatures have already agreed to ban abortion or are about to do so. But victory is not a culture of life. I really wish that were the case. The culture of guns and the desire to destroy others gives them false security and makes them fearful. The Supreme Court widened the possibility of continuing to kill on June 23. So what did they actually gain? They won greater opposition than they had ever had before. What they lost has yet to be felt. But the loss is there.

Evangelicals have lost their reason to exist

The standard call of evangelism is “You must be born again!” Unfortunately, they have upset their theology of salvation. Being born, it seems, has nothing to do with being alive. Therefore, to be born again means nothing to have life in the Holy Spirit. There is no appeal to “You must be conceived again.” In fact, the gospel idea of ​​having a born-again experience assumes that human life begins at birth. Nicodemus asks if people should return to their mother’s womb and be born again. Jesus, apparently, misses the opportunity to tell her about life from conception. Of course, in doing so, he would lose his claim.

It seems that an absolute doctrine of election is necessary for a righteously conceived person destined to have this born-again experience. An evangelical form of the Immaculate Conception for this elect, if you will.

Young women (and men)

Young people are leaving the churches. We already know that. The loss of reproductive rights will not encourage them to return to churches. Young women know that evangelicals want to control their lives. And they must not let it happen. Similarly, young men leave for the same reason. They could come back with their own children. But I seriously doubt it.

Mega churches tend to have an evangelical orientation. Drawing participants with showmanship will no longer work. Unless evangelicals repent of these attitudes, they will perish.

Evangelicals have lost political attention

Media attention on evangelicals wanes when their political influence wanes. When they endorse presidential candidates, it will no longer be a proxy vote for Supreme Court justices. If they elect another bigoted bully and narcissist, they’ll have to take a deep breath instead of pretending to hold their noses.

What will they work towards next? It could be LGBTQ rights and/or contraception. Maybe they could give creationism another try? Either way, it will be an attack on freedom in the name of freedom. Their sense of unhappiness and paranoia will grow as the loss of intimacy becomes more and more felt. Evangelicals do not yet realize that the constitutional right to privacy depends on the interpretation that has made the deer possible decision. Nothing loses like winning.

Evangelicals Lose Evangelicals

Beyond the shopping of evangelical churches, there is the departure of people who call themselves evangelicals from evangelical churches. Right-wing social media provides another community. Hate and chauvinism take the place of any talk of divine love for the world. Evangelical values ​​such as giving to the mission and raising children “in the education and warning of the Lord” are abandoned for secular goals that are endorsed by evangelical churches. Why this happens is interesting. Evangelicals, more than any other religious body, have regularly contributed to the culture of death. Evangelicals find ways to flourish that hurt everyone around them.

Unprepared Liberals

Progressive churches are not ready to offer anything that seems solid to the general population around us. These churches have spent their time being militant and trying to avoid acting like fundamentalists and evangelicals. Unfortunately, the only spiritual help offered is that of individual teachers. One book study here and one there does not do spiritual practice. It’s time to offer true fellowship and connection to the people we seek to help. We need a whole gospel that includes all of these attributes of the church.

The art of preaching should improve. Sermons and homilies that rely on intelligent use of Scripture are needed. Worship should be more than performance. Singing in worship is like a family gathering to sing around pianists or guitarists. Praying together as a church is important. It is as important as the community of work and practice. Individual prayer is as important to the life of the church as it is to the individual.

Liberal churches have forgotten the importance of being Christian in every way, just as evangelicals have. Valuing gathering together for worship and encouragement is what brings the kingdom of God out of the church.


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The intersection of art, education and cultural awareness https://micgillette.com/the-intersection-of-art-education-and-cultural-awareness/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 21:08:49 +0000 https://micgillette.com/the-intersection-of-art-education-and-cultural-awareness/ Artist Rich Tu combines culture, education and community in his work. Rich You The visual arts sector continues to grow at a rapid pace integrating applications of artistic and technological talent into the entertainment, fashion and marketing industries across the globe. Students are clamoring for more educational opportunities to get a head start on careers […]]]>

The visual arts sector continues to grow at a rapid pace integrating applications of artistic and technological talent into the entertainment, fashion and marketing industries across the globe. Students are clamoring for more educational opportunities to get a head start on careers that often begin long before the cap-and-gown ceremonies at the hands of doodlers across the country.

With such a need for artistic skills in growing career sectors, it is often surprising how arts programs are one of the hardest hit by budget cuts in education. Even with the $263 billion Education Stabilization Fund (ESF) earmarking some funds for arts programs, the coming years will face future uncertainties for arts initiatives.

Many teachers and advocates recognize the value of the arts in expression, connection, healing, and future career endeavours. For example, advocates from the New York City Council and the It Starts with the Arts Roundtable are pushing for an increase from $79.62 per student to $100 in 2022-23. They recognize the direct value of the arts in individual learning and the connection it brings to community and cultural expression.

I had the pleasure of sitting down with award-winning artist and podcaster Rich Tu to shed light on how art not only propelled a career, but also allowed for the expression of cultural understanding and connection. .

A first-generation, award-winning Filipino-American designer, Rich Tu resides in Brooklyn, NY, where he is Group Creative Director at Jones Knowles Ritchie in New York. He has worked creatively for many well known companies and brands including MTV Entertainment Group at ViacomCBS, Nike, Alfa Romeo, Bombay, Adidas, Converse, American Express, The New York Times, NPR and many more.

As the host of his Webby Award Honoree podcast, First Generation BurdenTu uses the platform to raise awareness of the intersection of immigrants with the creative community and industry.

On podcasting

Rod Berger: You created the First Generation Burden podcast, and I imagine that every word you selected for the title made sense to you. I want to dive into being an immigrant in this country. How has this influenced your sense of design and the lens you work with? Could you tell us about the podcast and what it means to you?

Rich You: Absolutely. First generation podcast is something that came into my life as a kind of catharsis and an attempt to tell stories. I wanted to create a platform to open discussions about the intersection of immigrants in the creative community.

In 2016, during the election cycle, I think we all knew what was being said about the immigrant community at that time. There was a negative connotation to the term immigrant, a term that I love and a source of pride for me and my family. My parents immigrated here from the Philippines.

At the time, the word ‘immigrant’ had become twisted and politicized in a way that turns your stomach and makes you feel ‘other’ and reinforces the feeling of being a perpetual outsider, especially in my case, the Asian Pacific Islander (API) community. But it affected so many people on a broader spectrum with immigrants in general.

The title of the podcast was meant to refer to being a first generation immigrant and also the burden of what that term meant at the time. Moreover, the word “burden” equates to a responsibility that is particularly pronounced within the immigrant community. We feel a burden involving our parents, our culture and all those who stayed at home because of the generational leap one makes to leave and go to a new place.

There is a comedian that I really like, Ronny Chieng. He actually talks about it a lot in his stand-up routines. He mentions that you can change your family’s life in one or two generations by being an immigrant. I recognize it’s a loaded title, First-Gen Burden the Podcast, but overall the content tends to be very light and fun. We mainly talk about creativity.

There are other points of connection, but there is definitely a component of social activism and personal storytelling. But again, it’s playful in the set up and I don’t want to give the impression that it’s all heavy (ha).

find a voice

Shepherd: If art imitates life, and I substitute voice for art, does the voice of an immigrant in a podcast allow a connection to life? Unfortunately, if we don’t create opportunities, immigrants may struggle to step out of the shadows of society, so to speak. Are you speaking in a way that allows people to come out and embrace their own truth and experience? How do you see him as an artist?

You: I think you summed it up beautifully. It’s about giving voice to a story, speaking with pride, credibility and validity, but not out of acceptability or necessity. You broadcast it out into the world and allow others to absorb it and understand it as a shared experience.

It’s an identity-first podcast, and we like to talk about identity; we are very open to talking about it. And it’s been a range of different types of conversations.

We talk to a lot of leaders in the podcast. I remember a conversation with my friend Veda Partalo, Vice President of Spotify. She tells a beautiful, sad and triumphant story of being in a transitional refugee camp for a year and a half in the 90s from Bosnia and Herzegovina. I also spoke to a first-generation Iranian, Melody Ehsani, Creative Director for Women’s Enterprises at Foot Locker. She talked about her faith and her creative process. She’s an amazing designer with her own brand. We try to demonstrate “immigrant excellence” with a sense of pride.

Early start in the art

Shepherd: Let’s talk about your artistic journey. How was 10-year-old Rich? Were you confident, daring, impetuous, shy and did your style already express itself at a young age? How were you as a student and what effect did that have on your art?

You: Ten-year-old Rich was probably a comic book nerd hanging out in suburban New Jersey. I was quite artistic, I drew all the time. The first drawing I remember is Leonardo, the Ninja Turtle. I did a life drawing, character study of this toy and I was about eight or nine years old, I thought it wasn’t that bad.

In school, my art was positively reinforced by my classmates in my cohort growing up. I was the elementary school kid, basically doing all of the other students’ art projects for them. In high school, my art developed further.

In fact, I wanted to become an editorial illustrator and I was studying towards it. After graduating from Rutgers University, I seriously studied illustration and it was there that I realized the path to creating a career. Overall, in my early days, I consumed tons of content, culture, and movies that informed the space I occupy now.

Education and Mentorship

Shepherd: What about your background, family or culture that has supported your artistic expression? Have you stumbled or had any mentors? Using the metaphor of a main frontman versus a session musician, you strike me as the frontman, someone who has found his own brush and his own canvas. The Next Generation is all about individual branding and opportunity, so could you talk about taking that leadership approach?

You: I love that metaphor, the session musician and the lead role. My father was an architect and one of his main ways of bonding with me was by showing me continuous line drawing as a study technique. So that was one of the things that kind of set me on my creative path and validated it for me.

My mother was a doctor who enhanced this STEM or STEAM approach with the associated art. My parents were my first mentors, but my openness to mentoring has evolved and expanded. We have a surprisingly creative extended family.

My brother-in-law is Jayson Atienza, and we’re the same age. He is a brilliant ad designer and an incredible artist. He recently collaborated with the Knicks and Madison Square Garden. He encouraged me to attend the School of Visual Arts in New York.

Further down the line is my brother-in-law Ron Oliver, who is married to my brother Eric. Ron is a director for Hallmark, Disney, Nickelodeon movies and many other studios. I enjoy talking to Ron about filmmaking and the longevity of his career. These are the people I’m lucky enough to call my family.

In education, one of my favorite mentors who recently passed away was Marshall Arisman. He was president of the School of Visual Arts MFA Illustration as a visual essay. He did the original cover of Brett Easton Ellis’ book American psycho and a famous cover for Darth Vader’s TIME magazine.

I was lucky to have so many mentors from my family throughout my studies. It always made me feel like I could be the leader, like the metaphor you refer to.

I’m the kind of lead guy who likes to play all the instruments or at least know all the instruments, a bit like Prince. He was an amazing singer, crushed the guitar and was an amazing drummer. Prince would create all of his tracks and, if he wanted, could sit on someone else’s track as a guest. So that’s the kind of approach I like to take.

I learned a lot in the commercial industry and in global branding at MTV, Nike and others. I find it helpful to have knowledge of a pipeline and multiple creative streams to lead in this space.


As art continues to intersect with cultural awareness and career, traditional employment models are giving way to more integrated creative pathways that join expression with community.

You s First Generation Burden podcast takes a serious look at immigrants to America who want to make an indelible difference while challenging cultural “isms.” The burden you speak of could be associated with community support systems that must raise the proverbial bar of cultural inclusiveness to support new and expanded community experiences.

While Tu can paint the picture he envisions, he might need some help handing out brushes to fellow community members.

Interviews have been edited and condensed for clarity.

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Brno welcomes guest teachers to promote innovative methods of music education for social change – Brno Daily https://micgillette.com/brno-welcomes-guest-teachers-to-promote-innovative-methods-of-music-education-for-social-change-brno-daily/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 09:23:35 +0000 https://micgillette.com/brno-welcomes-guest-teachers-to-promote-innovative-methods-of-music-education-for-social-change-brno-daily/ On June 16 and 17, Brno hosted more than 20 teachers from cities involved in the Czech-Slovak initiative “OnStage – Music Schools For Social Change”. The aim of the meeting was to introduce participants to this teaching method and to encourage them to implement similar programs in their cities. Photo credit: Jiri Slama Brno, Jun […]]]>

On June 16 and 17, Brno hosted more than 20 teachers from cities involved in the Czech-Slovak initiative “OnStage – Music Schools For Social Change”. The aim of the meeting was to introduce participants to this teaching method and to encourage them to implement similar programs in their cities. Photo credit: Jiri Slama

Brno, Jun 22 (BD) – The OnStage project is a music education pilot program that uses group music lessons to build social support for children and young people at risk of social exclusion. Last week, Brno welcomed more than 20 teachers within the framework of the project.

In a busy two-day program, teachers from participating cities visited two primary schools where Brno’s music programs were implemented. On Thursday, June 16, they visited the Náměstí 28. října primary school, where they took part in three activities. In the morning, they attended a music education class using the principles of the innovative el Sistema teaching method. In the afternoon, they attended a program of group lessons in violin and cello, followed by a two-hour workshop with teachers from the Superar School in Vienna, which has been using the el Sistema method for many years. . In this workshop, they learned practical information on how to work effectively with children in groups and were able to try out some rhythmic and musical exercises. Friday, June 17 included a visit to Merhautova Elementary School, where participants had the opportunity to take part in a group guitar lesson.

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Using music education to enhance social inclusion is an underdeveloped concept in the Czech Republic. The practice was introduced in Brno as part of the international OnStage project through the Urbact III operational program (which ran from January 2018 to June 2021). From visits to participating European cities, Brno gained valuable experience, which it used to present its own musical programs.

Teachers from participating cities took part in various activities, such as lectures, music education classes and group music lessons. Photo credit: Jiri Slama

“The OnStage project is a very interesting and parallel alternative to traditional basic music education,” said Jaroslav Suchý, Brno City Councilor for Education. “Because music programs take place directly in primary school buildings and are free (including the loan of a musical instrument), music education becomes more accessible to children who otherwise would not attend. wouldn’t even think of. Additionally, innovative group learning promotes cooperation and tolerance within the group, helping to create positive social bonds, so children learn on many levels.

As the Brno programs have proven to be such a success and are in high demand, the City of Brno had the opportunity to lead the ongoing Czech-Slovak OnStage initiative (July 2021 – December 2022) and pass on its experience to the participants Czechs. and Slovak towns, including Broumov, Neratovice, Plzeň, Banská Bystrica, Lučenec, Nitra and Trenčín.

“Despite the difficult start due to the pandemic situation, it is clear that the music programs of the OnStage project have found their place in Brno,” added Marek Fišer, Brno City Councilor for Culture. “It is also great that this innovative method of teaching music is not only continuing here in Brno, but that we can help spread it to other Czech and Slovak cities. I believe that the meeting will be inspiring for the cities involved, and I hope that in the future it will be possible not only to transmit the experience, but also to share it, whether in the form of joint concerts or other encounters.

https://brnodaily.com/2022/06/22/events-in-brno/brno-hosts-visiting-teachers-to-promote-innovative-music-education-methods-for-social-change/https://brnodaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/Czech-Slovak-ONSTAGE-project-music-credit-Jiri-Slama-1024×683.jpghttps://brnodaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/Czech-Slovak-ONSTAGE-project-music-credit-Jiri-Slama-150×100.jpgElisa PintonBrnoEvents in BrnoBrno,Education,Events in Brno,Music,SlovakiaOn June 16 and 17, Brno hosted more than 20 teachers from cities involved in the Czech-Slovak initiative “OnStage – Music Schools For Social Change”. The purpose of the meeting was to introduce participants to this teaching method and inspire them to implement similar programs in their…
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Mountain Melodies Music Camp Slots Still Open to Aspiring Musicians | Education https://micgillette.com/mountain-melodies-music-camp-slots-still-open-to-aspiring-musicians-education/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 20:29:29 +0000 https://micgillette.com/mountain-melodies-music-camp-slots-still-open-to-aspiring-musicians-education/ LAKE SARANAC — There are still 15 slots open for budding musicians at a week-long Mountain Melodies music camp in mid-July, and scholarships are available to fully pay for three campers to attend. Camp organizer Carolyn Greenberg said campers will work with five certified music teachers, have access to TrestleStreet’s “children’s zoo” of instruments and […]]]>

LAKE SARANAC — There are still 15 slots open for budding musicians at a week-long Mountain Melodies music camp in mid-July, and scholarships are available to fully pay for three campers to attend.

Camp organizer Carolyn Greenberg said campers will work with five certified music teachers, have access to TrestleStreet’s “children’s zoo” of instruments and equipment, and work on songs to play together.

Campers will all work to choral arrangements, but Greenberg said sessions will be flexible. They will have their pick of music-making crash courses to focus on. Greenberg called these “tasters”.

These will include sessions with lessons in singing, lyric writing, music theory, covers and digital music. Greenberg said digital music, like production or electronic music, isn’t taught as often, but by the end of the week campers will have been able to produce a ringtone, soundscape or short song.

It’s a half-day, week-long camp, so Greenberg said campers won’t come out as virtuosos or incredibly knowledgeable about music theory. She said the goal was to inspire a passion for creating music, create a community of young people making music with friends, and give them life skills to build on.

Campers will come out with “campfire guitar skills,” which is always invaluable, she said.

“If you learn three or four chords on the guitar, you can play literally thousands of songs,” Greenberg said.

The camp is for students in grades 4-12. It will run daily from July 18-22 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The camp will be hosted at TrestleStreet, a community music and arts space on Woodruff Street in Saranac. Lake. Inside the halls of TrestleStreet, there are instruments everywhere – horns, banjos, guitars, ukuleles, pianos, drums and many percussion instruments.

Half of the 30 places available for the camp have been filled, but there are still 15 left.

Camp registration is $125. Greenberg said two community members have reached out to offer scholarships to pay for those who cannot afford it. Three of these scholarships are available.

At the end of camp, they’ll have a song to perform on the Third Thursday Art Walk on July 21, a showcase for their parents to perform, and ideally, Greenberg said, a passion for making music a lifelong endeavor. .

Greenberg and her husband are from New Jersey. They bought a home in Saranac Lake before the pandemic shutdowns began in 2020 and have split their time interstate since then.

She said she has found so much art and music in Saranac Lake that she wants to make sure the next generation learns the skills and motivation to acquire those talents.

Greenberg has been playing the piano and singing since the age of 8, around the same age as the youngest members of the camp. She said she was lucky to have always had an outlet for it, whether it was through church productions, high school choirs or the rock bands she was in.

She always had a place to use her musical talents and thinks that’s what made her grow up, study and want to teach music.

“I found real applications for my music,” Greenberg said. “It’s also part of the camp’s goal, to ignite their passion for music, but also to see real ways to use music.”

The teachers at the camp are all certified in music education and come from the Northeast.

Greenberg said Rebecca Saltzman, a choral music teacher at Simsbury High School in Connecticut, is “one of the best teachers I’ve ever seen.” Greenberg said Saltzman taught his daughter Abigail. Abby is now a teacher at George Washington Middle School in Ridgewood, New Jersey, because of Saltzman, Carolyn said, and will teach at camp as well.

Abigail also brings in two friends, musicians and fellow University of Delaware graduates – Nathan Bischoff and Alyssa Bernstein.

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Mountain music in the key of life – Press Banner https://micgillette.com/mountain-music-in-the-key-of-life-press-banner/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 21:02:04 +0000 https://micgillette.com/mountain-music-in-the-key-of-life-press-banner/ When Sydney Gorham was five, she started her first business, “Sydney’s Outdoor Chore Service”. The petite entrepreneur waddled around her San Jose neighborhood with a bucket of cleaning supplies and a stack of handmade business cards; Gorham went door to door and did odd jobs for his neighbors, who benefited more than anything. Gorham moved […]]]>

When Sydney Gorham was five, she started her first business, “Sydney’s Outdoor Chore Service”. The petite entrepreneur waddled around her San Jose neighborhood with a bucket of cleaning supplies and a stack of handmade business cards; Gorham went door to door and did odd jobs for his neighbors, who benefited more than anything.

Gorham moved to a completely different realm when she was a bit older. She ran the “Singing Club” at the Boulder Creek family home.

“I wanted something that would engage kids all year round,” she explained. “It all started with a handful of children. We learned sets of songs, and they gave recitals. By the time I left for college, we had over 30 kids attending and playing.

Gorham graduated from San Lorenzo Valley High School in 2009 and headed to Cabrillo College with a desire to be a musical theater major.

After taking a music fundamentals course, she found a new direction for her major and transferred to the University of the Pacific in Stockton.

From there, his musical prowess grew. Gorham graduated in 2016 with a Bachelor of Music degree. While working in a studio in Lodi, her love and appreciation for all things music led to the passion she instilled at Mountain Music School in Scotts Valley.

Gorham’s angelic voice has been featured at Mountain Community Theater and events throughout the county and beyond. She was part of the Little People’s Repertory Theater and then went on to teach the group’s Junior Players after graduating from the program.

Since opening the music studio – formerly B Sharp – five years ago, Gorham has seen his business crescendo despite the pandemic.

“There were three teachers,” she says. “We had three small rooms in our original studio, and as our business grew, we needed to expand to accommodate our clients.”

Mountain Music now has 12 staff members in three separate spaces in the King’s Village mall; in addition to vocal work, the instructors also teach piano (Kiddie Keys for the little ones), guitar, ukulele, drums, sax, trumpet and clarinet. Gorham’s favorite part, however, is when his 160 students take part in recitals that are given in the center courtyard.

“It’s a hoot,” Gorham said. “We have students of all ages, from preschoolers to seniors, and all levels performing, and this is their moment of gratification. It is rewarding for everyone involved; they can fight their fears and demonstrate what they have learned.

Gorham advises his students to visualize their entire recital day to calm frayed nerves. She tells them that being nervous is a normal part of the experience. Most of our students are beginners, and many of them are fulfilling a lifelong dream of learning to sing or play an instrument. That moment of discovery – when students hit the right note or strum the right chord – is the best.

“The younger guys haven’t gotten this message yet that they’re not good enough or talented enough,” Gorham said. “Talent is a buzzword in music and education, music is a skill and you can learn it. Some people may have a natural inclination towards music, but anyone can learn to sing or We make room for students’ goals and create a program that helps them achieve their dreams.

Gorham watched her young students grow into teenagers and continue to play theater roles, and now she hopes some of those students will come back to teach.
“We are growing so fast that we need teachers,” she said. “I want this school to be a hub where professionals can come to work, teach and learn from each other.”

Gorham’s dream is to one day have a venue for performances so she can showcase her staff and students.

“We don’t teach just one method of music,” she says. “The style and approach of each instructor makes us unique in the world of music education.”
As the school continues to expand, Gorham said 2023 will be the year of “Band Camp.”

“We don’t know what it will sound like – it could be piano, vocals or ukulele – we’re just trying to focus,” she said. “Since we only do one-to-one lessons, it’s exciting to consider having a group experience for our students.”

mountainmusicschoolsv.com

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Rolling Meadows High School Drum Major Named Calisch Prize Winner https://micgillette.com/rolling-meadows-high-school-drum-major-named-calisch-prize-winner/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 14:14:38 +0000 https://micgillette.com/rolling-meadows-high-school-drum-major-named-calisch-prize-winner/ Each year, the Richard W. Calisch Arts Unlimited Award is presented to the District 214 elder who best exemplifies creative excellence in the arts. The award was created in honor of Richard Calisch, former English teacher and coordinator of the Arts Unlimited program. Each comprehensive high school in District 214 nominates a senior student for […]]]>

Each year, the Richard W. Calisch Arts Unlimited Award is presented to the District 214 elder who best exemplifies creative excellence in the arts. The award was created in honor of Richard Calisch, former English teacher and coordinator of the Arts Unlimited program. Each comprehensive high school in District 214 nominates a senior student for this recognition.

The 2022 recipient of the Richard W. Calisch Arts Unlimited Award from District 214 is Autumn Hong of Rolling Meadows High School – a two-year-old drum major for the Mustangs marching band and captain of the speech team.

Autumn used her artistic and leadership talents in multiple ways during four years at Rolling Meadows.

Autumn started out as a clarinet in the Rolling Meadows concert and marching bands, also playing alto sax for the jazz band. Her career with the Marching Mustangs culminated with two years as a drum major, where she proved to be a diligent, driven and compassionate leader. She was named Outstanding Drum Major at the Sandwich Renegade Festival, and was also recognized as an Outstanding Solist at the Mundelein Jazz Festival.

Autumn also sought out other opportunities to play music in school bands: taking bassoon for a symphony orchestra and wind band and leading the pit band for the school variety show — and showcasing her talents. on up to six different instruments at variety shows.

Band Director and Fine Arts Coordinator, Christopher Buti, considers Autumn a talented and accomplished artist, a respected leader who has demonstrated a desire to succeed in multiple areas of the arts and music.

Autumn was also a member of the Rolling Meadows speaking team for four years, including two years as team captain. She created a Big Brother and Little Brother mentorship program to provide support to first-time students on the team. In her senior year, she was a six-time medalist in speech, including being named MSL Conference Champion and IHSA Section Qualifier in Special Occasion Speech.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

She has also been a member of drama department productions, including putting her speaking skills to good use for radio plays during the pandemic.

This year’s other nominees represented talent and leadership in dance, vocal music, orchestra, band and visual arts. They included:

Lexi Conejo, Wheeling High School

According to her vocal musical director, Lexi Conejo’s gift is her love and respect for the creative process – as well as her ability to engage in many activities while remaining completely invested in each one.

Lexi spent her four years at Wheeling High School involved in all aspects of the performing arts, as well as the speaking team. She was a four-year member of the Wheeling Orchesis dance troupe, where she was named the group’s Senior Star this year. She was named to the District Honors Dance Festival and, as a member of Orchesis, had the opportunity to perform at regional and national dance festivals.

She sang in the Wheeling Gospel Choir, Chamber Choir, and after-school musical theater group Mozaik, serving as section leader for all three ensembles. She has also used her vocal and dance talents as a performer in six different musical productions. In addition to participating in the District Honors Music Festival for three years, Lexi was named Outstanding Sophomore and Junior Vocalist during her years at Wheeling.

In addition to her vocal and dance work, Lexi spent four years in the Wheeling Orchestra program and three years on the speech team.

She has also used her talents in community service, as a choreographer for the children’s workshop Orchesis, and as a performer and student director at the philanthropic organization Dance for Life in Chicago.

Elizabeth Ferrazza, John Hersey High School

Lizzie Ferrazza made a unique and widespread impact during her four years at Hersey High School, including serving as Nanook, the school mascot, and writing, editing and filming the daily morning announcements.

Lizzie was a four-year member of the Hersey Theater Program, writing, directing and performing in the cast of four musicals and six plays. She also performed in community theater productions at Harper College and spent three years as a member and leader of the Hersey Improv Club.

She used her creativity and performing skills when she took on the role of Nanook the Huskie. When the school was closed during the pandemic, Lizzie donned her Nanook costume and filmed videos full of support and encouragement for the student body. His Nanook YouTube channel features “Nanook: Home Alone” as well as “How Nanook Stole Christmas” and other videos, some of which have been featured on local TV news programs.

Lizzie was often the voice of Hersey: in addition to writing and delivering the morning announcements, she was the host of the variety show and holiday assembly, and was the first student announcer in the Robot Rumble contest of the district.

Lizzie was also on Hersey’s speaking team and served as a teacher’s aide for the Advanced Drama class.

Kennedy Gerber, Buffalo Grove High School

His teachers say that Kennedy Gerber transports ideas from one art form to another. This is evident from her artistic involvement at Buffalo Grove High School, where she took seven art classes and was named the 2021 winner of the Harper Art Show. Kennedy spent her Saturdays last year in the Portfolio class at the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design, winning a coveted presidential scholarship.

But Kennedy also used her artistry in music, where she was a member of various Buffalo Grove choirs for four years. And she worked for four years as a member of the theater arts team, becoming the go-to lighting board operator for school productions and earning the title of master electrician in her freshman year. Last year, she was also stage manager for “Grease”, the musical. She has volunteered to operate lights and sound for school events including assemblies, concerts and special presentations.

Raphael Lausa, Elk Grove High School

Raphael Lausa’s passion is to share his love for music and to make the arts accessible to everyone. It’s no surprise that he plans to pursue a degree in music education and hopes to work at the high school level.

He gained teaching and conducting experience at Elk Grove High School, where he played violin and was concertmaster of the Symphony Orchestra and Chamber Orchestra. His superior talent was recognized when he was named a member of the District 214 Honors Orchestra as well as the ILMEA District Orchestra. He has also performed with a variety of other national and regional ensembles.

Raphael was also part of District 214’s Educator Preparation Program for prospective teachers, participating in teaching placements at the district’s feeder schools. Alone, he created and ran what he calls “Lunch Buddies” for members of the Elk Grove Orchestra to meet and play music together during the lunch hour. He arranged the music and acted as bandleader for the band, whose year culminated with a performance at the Spring Band Concert.

Raphael also learned other instruments: double bass, viola and trumpet, which he played in the Elk Grove Jazz Band and in the pit band for the Spring Musical.

Rey Tello, Prospect High School

Rey Tello took advantage of every artistic opportunity — across the spectrum — at Prospect High School. He spent four years playing the cello in the orchestra and four years in dance lessons. He was also an actor, dancer, writer and a member of the Prospect theater productions team, including as a student director.

Rey is also a visual artist, with his work featured in Prospect’s Art Magazine for the past three years. In his senior year, he was a cartoonist for the Prospector newspaper.

Outside of school, Rey maintains Instagram accounts for her digital and visual art as well as her photography. He also writes fiction. He plays the piano and electric guitar in addition to the cello.

]]> Mountain Statesman | TCMS student selected to perform at Carnegie Hall https://micgillette.com/mountain-statesman-tcms-student-selected-to-perform-at-carnegie-hall/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 21:19:25 +0000 https://micgillette.com/mountain-statesman-tcms-student-selected-to-perform-at-carnegie-hall/ TAYLOR COUNTY—A local talent will take to the big stage in the coming days, after being selected for the 2022 Middle School Honors performance series at Carnegie Hall. Taylor County Middle School (TCMS) student Parker Biller, son of Chad and Jennifer Biller, has been studying music for six years, and his dedication, dedication and love […]]]>

TAYLOR COUNTY—A local talent will take to the big stage in the coming days, after being selected for the 2022 Middle School Honors performance series at Carnegie Hall.

Taylor County Middle School (TCMS) student Parker Biller, son of Chad and Jennifer Biller, has been studying music for six years, and his dedication, dedication and love of the stage and music has helped him rise above the competition from thousands of other students.

Earlier this year, Biller auditioned for the honors performance series, featuring his own rendition of Bing Crosby’s song “More I Cannot Wish You,” from the hit musical guys and dolls.

“I love his style of music and the song was perfect for my lineup,” Biller said.

Pitched against many other talents, Biller was recently accepted after review by the Honors Selection Board. The position is limited to top-rated artists in the college from around the world.

“We process thousands of applications each year, selecting only the most talented performers,” said Marion Gomez, Program Director for the Honors Performance Series. “Being selected for the Honors Performance Series is something every junior finalist should be extremely proud to accomplish.”

Performing at Carnegie Hall is known as the pinnacle of musical achievement, and there is no doubt that Biller’s talent and dedication led to this marvelous achievement.

“I’m so excited to meet other singers from around the world and to have the opportunity to sing in such a prestigious place as Carnegie Hall,” Biller said. “I know this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, and I won’t take it for granted. I’m so grateful to all of my music teachers, and especially Ms. Chiado, for working with me to prepare the upcoming audition and performance.

On a mission to become a more complete and accomplished performer, the youngster studied voice with Greg DeVito, at the Academy of Arts at Fairmont State University, as well as piano under the tutelage of Carla Engle.

In addition to the piano, Biller also plays guitar.

Biller was also a member of the Taylor County Middle School Choir, under the direction of Sarah Chiado and Duretha Mayle.

And because of both his attention to his craft and his exceptional commitment as a student, he was recently awarded the Christine Schulz Memorial Award for Excellence in Taylor County Middle School Choir and the Lynn Smith Memorial Award, given by Taylor County Middle School 8th grade. teachers, for academics, perseverance, leadership and responsibility.

In addition to music, Biller is also a member of the TCMS cross-country team, plays baseball, and was elected freshman class president for next year at Grafton High School.

Biller, singing as bass, will join other junior finalists in New York from June 15-19 to perform on the big stage. They will have the opportunity to learn from world-renowned conductors, work with other junior finalists, and get a taste of New York, including a Broadway show.

“Working with these conductors and performing at Carnegie Hall is a unique experience that these musicians will never forget,” Gomez said.

The Middle School Honors performance series concert will take place on Saturday, June 18 at the Stern Auditorium on the Perelman Stage.

During the event, performers will include the Honors Junior Choir, conducted by Jessica Nápoles; the Honors Junior Orchestra conducted by Angela Woo, conductor; and the Honors Junior Band under Curt Ebersole.

The show is open to the public.

Tickets can be purchased at the Carnegie Hall box office by visiting https://www.carnegiehall.org/Events.

The Honors Performance Series is proudly presented by WorldStrides, the nation’s leading educational travel organization.

From classical musicians and composers, such as Tchaikovsky, Yo Yo Ma and George Gershwin, to artists such as Frank Sinatra, the Beatles, Etta James, Louis Armstrong and Patsy Cline, the list of performers who will grace the stage at Carnegie Hall is long. and estimated.

“What an accomplishment this is for Parker,” Chiado said. “I’m so proud of this wonderful young man and can’t wait to see what the future holds for him!”

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